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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Health predicting factors in a general population over an eight-year period in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain2008In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 98-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many factors are proposed to be associated with health-related quality of life. Knowledge of health factors associated to development of a good health-related quality of life could be of use in clinical practice and public health work. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health factors and health-related quality of life at baseline and in an eight-year follow up in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain in a cohort from a general population. METHODS: The study was designed as a longitudinal study in a Swedish general population (N=1 849) with a postal questionnaire at baseline 1995 and at follow up 2003. Subjects were divided into two groups, according to their response about chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and suggested health factors were estimated by OR and 95 % CI calculated by multivariable logistic regressions, with adjustment for all health factors, age, sex and baseline SF-36 values. RESULTS: Although subjects without chronic musculoskeletal pain reported better health-related quality of life than subjects with chronic pain, similar health factors were found to be associated to higher scores in SF-36 at baseline and predicted a better outcome in the eight-year follow up. The most consistent finding was a better health outcome in the eight-year follow up for subjects that were feeling rested after sleep. Other factors that in some aspects predicted a better outcome were belonging to higher socioeconomic group, being a native Swede, having emotional support, having good sleep structure, never being or being a former smoker, and regularly drinking alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: The most important health factor in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain was feeling rested after sleep, but also emotional support, sleep structure, smoking and alcoholic habits appears to be important components. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with painful musculoskeletal disorders. Since several health factors are common in both subjects with and without pain there could be a common strategy to be formed in public health programmes.

  • 2.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Hamlstad.
    Kadrija, Ibadete
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Minneapolis-Manchester quality of life-youth form and adolescent form2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has become important to measure long-term effects and quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer. The Minneapolis- Manchester Quality of Life (MMQL) instrument has been proven to better capture the quality of life (QoL) perspective of health than other instruments. The instrument has age appropriate versions and is therefore favourable for longitudinal studies of QoL of children surviving from cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of MMQL-Youth Form and the Adolescent Form focusing on: 1) face and content validity 2) the internal consistency and 3) the test-retest reliability.

    Methods

    The sample consisted of 950 pupils (11–16 years old) from 7 schools in the western Sweden who completed the questionnaire. For the test-retest evaluation 230 respondents completed the questionnaire two weeks later.

    Results

    Face and content validity was supported and internal consistency was found to be acceptable for the total scale for both the MMQL-Youth Form (8–12 years of age) and the Adolescent Form (13–20 years of age). Test-retest reliability for the MMQL-Youth Form was moderate for 50% of the items and good for the remaining. For the MMQL-Adolescent Form the test-retest showed moderate or good agreement for 80% of the items and fair for 20%.

    Conclusions

    The result indicated that the Swedish version of the MMQLYouth Form and Adolescent Form was valid and reliable in a sample of healthy children in a Swedish context. It is recommended to test the instrument among diverse samples of children such as survivors of childhood cancer in order to validate its usefulness in research and clinical settings.

  • 3.
    Guo, Cheng
    et al.
    Medical Management Centre, Karolinska Institutet.
    Tomson, Göran
    Medical Management Centre, Karolinska Institutet.
    Guo, Jizhi
    Weifang Medical University.
    Li, Xiangyu
    Weifang Medical University.
    Keller, Christina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Söderqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet.
    Psychometric evaluation of the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF) in Chinese adolescents - a methodological study2015In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In epidemiological surveillance of mental health there is good reason to also include scales that measure the presence of well-being rather than merely symptoms of ill health. The Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF) is a self-reported scale to measure emotional, psychological and social well-being and conduct categorical diagnosis of positive mental health. This particular instrument includes the three core components of the World Health Organization’s definition of mental health and had previously not been psychometrically evaluated on adolescents in China.

    Methods

    In total 5,399 students (51.1 % female) from schools in the urban areas of Weifang in China were included in the study (mean age = 15.13, SD = 1.56). Participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire with several scales, among them the MHC-SF. Statistical analyses to evaluate reliability, structural validity, measurement invariance, presence of floor and ceiling effects and to some extent external validity of the MHC-SF were carried out.

    Results

    The Cronbach’s α coefficients for sub-scales as well as the total scale were all above 0.80 indicating good reliability. Confirmative factor analysis confirmed the three-dimensional structure of the Chinese version of MHC-SF and supported the configural and metric invariance across gender and age. Noteworthy ceiling effects were observed for single items and sub-scales although not for the total scale. More importantly, observed floor effects were negligible. The stronger correlation found between MHC-SF and Minneapolis-Manchester Quality of Life Instrument (as measure of positive mental health) than between MHC-SF and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (as measure of mental illness and distress) yielded support for external validity.

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, the main findings of this study are in line with studies from other countries that evaluated the psychometric properties of the MHC-SF and show that this instrument, that includes the three core components of the WHO definition of mental health, is useful in assessing positive adolescent mental health also in China.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Unit for Research and Development in Primary Health Care, Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lingfors, Hans
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Unit for Community Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Can physical activity compensate for low socioeconomic status with regard to poor self-rated health and low quality-of-life?2019In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both high socioeconomic status (SES) and high physical activity (PA) are associated with better self-rated health (SRH) and higher quality-of-life (QoL).

    AIM: To investigate whether high levels of PA may compensate for the association between low SES and subjective health outcomes in terms of poorer SRH and lower QoL.

    METHOD: Data from a cross-sectional, population-based study (n = 5326) was utilized. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between indicators of SES (economic situation and educational level), SRH and QoL, as well as between the combination of SES and PA in relation to SRH and QoL.

    RESULT: Participants with high PA and economic problems had approximately the same OR for good SRH as those with low PA and without economic problems (OR 1.75 [95% CI 1.20-2.54] and 1.81 [1.25-2.63] respectively). Participants with high PA and low education had higher odds for good SRH (OR 3.34 [2.96-5.34] compared to those with low PA and high education (OR 1.46 [0.89-2.39]).Those with high PA and economic problems had an OR of 2.09 [1.42-3.08], for high QoL, while the corresponding OR for those with low PA and without economic problems was 4.38 [2.89-6.63].

    CONCLUSION: Physically active people with low SES, had the same or even better odds to report good SRH compared to those with low PA and high SES. For QoL the result was not as consistent. The findings highlight the potential for promotion of PA to reduce SES-based inequalities in SRH.

  • 5. Norekvål, TM
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Rokne, B
    Segadel, L
    Wentzel-Larsen, T
    Nordrehaug, JE
    Patient-reported outcomes as predictors of 10-year survival in women after acute myocardial infarction2010In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 8, p. no. 140-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Norekvål, TM
    et al.
    Wahl, AK
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö universitet.
    Nordrehaug, JE
    Wentzel-Larsen, T
    Hanestad, BR
    Quality of life in female myocardial infarction survivors: a comparative study with a randomly selected general female population cohort2007In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, no 5, p. 58-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Comparing children's self-report instruments for health-related quality of life using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY)2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with chronic conditions often experience a long treatment which can be complex and negatively impacts the child's well-being. In planning treatment and interventions for children with chronic conditions, it is important to measure health-related quality of life (HrQoL). HrQoL instruments are considered to be a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) and should be used in routine practice. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the content dimensions of HrQoL instruments for children's self-reports using the framework of ICF-CY. Method: The sample consist of six instruments for health-related quality of life for children 5 to 18 years of age, which was used in the Swedish national quality registries for children and adolescents with chronic conditions. The following instruments were included: CHQ-CF, DCGM-37, EQ-5D-Y, KIDSCREEN-52, Kid-KINDL and PedsQL 4.0. The framework of the ICF-CY was used as the basis for the comparison. Results: There were 290 meaningful concepts identified and linked to 88 categories in the classification ICF-CY with 29 categories of the component body functions, 48 categories of the component activities and participation and 11 categories of the component environmental factors. No concept were linked to the component body structures. The comparison revealed that the items in the HrQoL instruments corresponded primarily with the domains of activities and less with environmental factors. Conclusions: In conclusion, the results confirm that ICF-CY provide a good framework for content comparisons that evaluate similarities and differences to ICF-CY categories. The results of this study revealed the need for greater consensus of content across different HrQoL instruments. To obtain a detailed description of children's HrQoL, DCGM-37 and KIDSCREEN-52 may be appropriate instruments to use that can increase the understanding of young patients' needs.

  • 8.
    Sjölander, Catarina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Rolander, Bo
    The Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Järhult, Johannes
    The Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Health-related quality of life in family members of patients with an advanced cancer diagnosis: A one-year prospective study2012In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 10, no 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Receiving a cancer diagnosis affects family members as well as the person diagnosed. Familymembers often provide support for the sick person in daily life out of duty and love, and may not always think of their own vulnerability to illness. To individualise support for them, family members who are most at risk for becoming ill must be identified. The aim of this study was to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in family members of patients with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer 3 to 15 months after diagnosis.

    Methods: Data on mental and physical dimensions of HRQOL were collected from family members of these patients in this prospective quantitative study. Five assessments using the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and EuroQol (EQ-5D) were conducted during a 1-year period starting 3 months after diagnosis. Thirty-six family members completed the study, i.e. participated in all five data collections.

    Results: No statistically significant changes in physical or mental HRQOL within the study group appeared over the 1-year follow-up. Compared with norm-based scores, family members had significantly poorer mental HRQOL scores throughout the year as measured by the SF-36. Family members also scored statistically significantly worse on the EQ-5D VAS in all five assessments compared to the norm-based score. Findings showed that older family members and partners were at higher risk for decreased physical HRQOL throughout the 1-year period, and younger family members were at higher risk for poorer mental HRQOL.

    Conclusions: It is well known that ill health is associated with poor HRQOL. By identifying family members with poor HRQOL, those at risk of ill health can be identified and supported. Future large-scale research that verifies our findings is needed before making recommendations for individualised support and creating interventions best tailored to family members at risk for illness.

  • 9.
    Tsai, Meng-Che
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Strong, Carol
    Department of Public Health, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Latner, Janet D.
    Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
    Lin, Yi-Ching
    Department of Early Childhood and Family Education, College of Education, National Taipei University of Education, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Wang, Shu-Mei
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Attitudes toward and beliefs about obese persons across Hong Kong and Taiwan: wording effects and measurement invariance2019In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The psychosocial consequences of obesity are important but often underrated. The Attitudes Toward Obese Persons (ATOP) and Beliefs About Obese Persons (BAOP) scales used to measure weight-related bias have little psychometric information, especially in East Asian contexts. The objective of this study was to use rigorous statistical methods to demonstrate the psychometric properties of these two instruments in Hong Kong and Taiwanese college students.

    METHODS: A convenience sample of 707 students was recruited from the universities in Hong Kong and Taiwan. Several competing confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were conducted to confirm the factorial structure of the ATOP and BAOP. The best fit models for the ATOP and BAOP were chosen for the examination of the measurement invariance across subcultures. We then compared configurable models with or without loading and/or intercept constrained before correlating the latent constructs between the best models for the ATOP and BAOP.

    RESULTS: The comparison in multiple CFAs found that the model with one factor and two correlated-wording-method factors outperformed the other models for both the ATOP and BOAP. However, the internal consistency was suboptimal (ATOP: α = .56 to .80; BTOP: α = .57 to .65) and the measurement invariance was somewhat unsupported among the Hong Kong and Taiwan samples. Moreover, after controlling wording effects, the latent construct of the ATOP was moderately associated with that of BAOP (r = .356; p < .001).

    CONCLUSION: Chinese versions of the ATOP and BAOP can be treated as a unidimensional factor for use in Hong Kong and Taiwan university students. However, further refinements of both instruments may be needed before using them to capture the social attitudes and beliefs toward obesity individuals, which is expected to advance our understanding of weight-related bias in East Asian contexts.

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