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  • 1.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University.
    Encounters in close care relations from the perspective of personal assistants working with persons with severe disablility.2010In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 180-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract In Sweden adults with major and sustainable disabilities can be granted publicly financed support in the form of personal assistance after assessment and decision-making in accordance with government rules. The purpose of the present study was to explore more deeply the encounters in close care relations between personal assistants and disabled persons of working age, as well as the prerequisites for and obstacles to the success of such encounters, this from the perspective of the personal assistants. Thirty-two personal assistants (22- to 55-year old) who worked for 32 persons with serious neurological diseases living at home were interviewed. The transcribed unstructured interviews were qualitatively analysed using latent content analysis. The analyses resulted in five main themes: Perceptive awareness, Entering into the other's role, Mutuality, Handling the relationship and Personal difficulties facing the assistant. These themes illustrated that a prerequisite for the encounter's being meaningful is that the assistant should be able to observe and understand the unique needs of the disabled person. The assistant must furthermore be able to put herself/himself into the other person's position. It is also important that the personal chemistry between the assistant and the disabled person should be good. Being able to share feelings and interests with the functionally impaired person provides the assistant with positive emotional confirmation of a good relationship. A distressing dilemma the assistant faces is that of distinguishing between the working relationship and the personal friendship. In this borderline area are found experiences, feelings and events that the assistant may view as negative or even unacceptable. This study contributes to the understanding of the complexity underlying the daily community care of disabled persons with an extensive need for care and assistance.

  • 2.
    Cordier, Reinie
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Wilson, Nathan J.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Richmond, NSW, Australia.
    Stancliffe, Roger J.
    Intellectual Disability, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia .
    MacCallum, Judith
    School of Education, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Buchanan, Angus
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Formal intergenerational mentoring at Australian Men's Sheds: a targeted survey about mentees, mentors, programmes and quality2016In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 24, no 6, p. e131-e143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intergenerational mentoring enables a purposeful exchange of skills and knowledge to enhance individual and social outcomes for sub-groups at risk of health and social disparities. Male intergenerational mentoring may be an approach to help address these disparities in young men. Over 1000 Men's Sheds operate in Australia with 39% providing some form of mentoring mainly to youth. Yet, little is known about the variables intrinsic to creating and running quality programmes. This study aimed to identify the characteristics of formal intergenerational mentoring programmes, review their quality against the Australian Youth Mentoring Network (AYMN) quality benchmarks, and identify the factors that predict quality in these programmes. All known Australian Men's Sheds were invited to participate in an online cross-sectional survey. Forty sheds with formal mentor programmes completed the survey for a total of 387 mentees (mean = 9.7 mentees/programme), the majority being male. The majority of mentor programme facilitators were unpaid male volunteers aged 61 years and older, and programmes were unfunded. Promoting social and emotional well-being of the mentees was the primary focus in more than half of the programmes, and working on a shared construction project was the most common activity. Respondents rated the three most important factors that influenced programme effectiveness as being: (i) meaningful activities; (ii) mentors’ approach; and (iii) a safe environment. Univariate analyses revealed that mentoring programmes that had a system in place for screening mentors, trained mentors and evaluated the programme were most likely to rate highly against the AYMN quality benchmarks. 

  • 3. Haraldsson, K
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lunds universitet.
    Baigi, A
    Marklund, B
    The self-reported health condition of women after their participation in a stress management programme: a pilot study2005In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 224-230Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Håkansson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    Henriksen, Eva
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    First-line managers' views on leadership and palliative care in Swedish nursing homes2013In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lannering, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Region Jönköping County, Futurum, Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Johansson, Linda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Prevention of falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers among older persons: nursing staff’s experiences of a structured preventive care process2017In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 1011-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A structured and systematic care process for preventive work, aimed to reduce falls, pressure ulcers and malnutrition among older people, has been developed in Sweden. The process involves risk assessment, teambased interventions and evaluation of results. Since development, this structured work process has become web-based and has been implemented in a national quality registry called ‘Senior Alert’ and used countrywide. The aim of this study was to describe nursing staff’s experience of preventive work by using the structured preventive care process as outlined by Senior Alert. Eight focus group interviews were conducted during 2015 including staff from nursing homes and homebased nursing care in three municipalities. The interview material was subjected to qualitative content analysis. In this study, both positive and negative opinions were expressed about the process. The systematic and structured work flow seemed to only partly facilitate care providers to improve care quality by making better clinical assessments, performing team-based planned interventions and learning from results. Participants described lack of reliability in the assessments and varying opinions about the structure. Furthermore, organisational structures limited the preventive work.

  • 6.
    Schön, Per
    et al.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lagergren, Mårten
    Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rapid decrease in length of stay in institutional care for older people in Sweden between 2006 and 2012: results from a population-based study2016In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 631-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited knowledge about older people’s length of stay (time untildeath) in institutional care and how it has changed over time. The aim ofthis study was to analyse changes in the length of stay for older peoplein institutional care between 2006 and 2012. All persons 65+ living inKungsholmen (an urban area of Stockholm), who moved to an institutionbetween 2006 and 2012, were included (N = 1103). The data source wasthe care system part of a longitudinal database, the Swedish NationalStudy on Aging and Care. The average length of stay was analysed usingLaplace regression for the 10th to the 50th percentile for the years 2006–2012. The regressions showed that in 2006, it took an average of 764 daysbefore 50% of those who had moved into institutional care had died. Thecorresponding figure for 2012 was 595 days, which amounts to a 22.1%decrease over the period studied (P = 0.078). For the lower percentiles,the decrease was even more rapid, for example for the 30th percentile,the length of stay reduced from 335 days in 2006 to 119 days in 2012, adecrease of 64.3% (P < 0.001). The most rapid increase was found in theproportion that moved to an institution and died within a short timeperiod. In 2006, the first 10% had on average died after 85 days, in 2012after only 8 days; a decrease in the length of stay of 90.5% (P = 0.002). Ingeneral, there was a significant decrease in the length of stay ininstitutional care between 2006 and 2012. The most dramatic change overthe period studied was an increase in the proportion of people whomoved into an institution and died shortly afterwards.

  • 7.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Samuelsson, Gillis
    Hagberg, Bo
    Dehlin, Ove
    Formal support, mental disorders and personal characteristics: a 25-year follow-up study of a total cohort of older people2003In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was designed to describe the pattern of long-term formal support received by people with mental disorders, and to investigate the relationship between the medical, psychological and social characteristics of the participants and types of formal support. This study is based on a cohort (n = 192) of people born in 1902 and 1903 in a community in Southern Sweden. The research participants were assessed using interviews, psychological tests and medical examinations. Information was collected about the use of primary healthcare and social services. The first assessment took place when the cohort was aged 67 years, and then on eight further occasions until they were 92. The participation rate ranged from 72% to 100%. During the observation period of 25 years, 53% of people with dementia eventually received both home help and institutional care compared to 34% of people with other psychiatric diagnoses and 12% of people with good mental health. The last group had all physical health problems and/or problems with activities of daily living. However, 35% of the dementia group, 46% with other psychiatric diagnoses and 52% of people with good mental health did not receive any formal support. Males and self-employed people were significantly less likely to use formal support. The institutionalised group reported loneliness significantly more often than the other two groups. In a logistic regression analysis, loneliness, low social class, high blood pressure and low problem-solving ability were predictors of formal support use. People with a mental disorder, including dementia, were significantly more likely to use formal support compared to people with good mental health. Social factors were the main factors predicting formal support.

  • 8. Von Bothmer, M I K
    et al.
    Mattsson, B
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lunds universitet.
    Influences on adolescent smoking behaviour: siblings' smoking and norms in the social environment do matter2002In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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