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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lim, Chih-Ing
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA..
    Code sets for everyday life situations of children aged 0-6: Sleeping, Mealtimes and Play - a study based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth2013In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fi]

    Introduction: The complexity of the Child and Youth version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, the ICF-CY, is a challenge for occupational therapists and other professionals in clinical work. Code sets including only essential categories help to make it more user-friendly. Thus far, code sets have been developed to reflect functioning for children in different developmental periods. However, there are no code sets that support screening of participation in everyday life situations and can be used across diagnoses. This exploratory study is the first attempt to develop code sets for preschoolers’ (age 0-6 years) everyday life situations.

    Method: Using sequential Delphi processes with expert panels consisting of 35 professionals in five interdisciplinary early intervention teams and six parents of children, the study identified content in three code sets: Sleeping, Mealtimes and Play.

    Results: A limited number of relevant categories were identified for three code sets: Sleeping (12), Mealtimes (21) and Play (30). Findings suggested a professional focus on Environmental factors compared with a parental focus on Body functions.

    Conclusion: It is important to consider the opinions of all involved when developing code sets to provide a common framework for screening of children’s everyday functioning.

  • 2.
    Cederfeldt, Marie
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Widell, Yvonne
    Occupational Therapy Department, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology,The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gosman-Hedström, Gunilla
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology,The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Concurrent validity of the executive function performance test in people with mild stroke2011In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 74, no 9, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Studies have shown that executive dysfunction is common in adults after stroke. Occupational therapists working in acute care assess the performance of activities of daily living; most instruments focus on personal care. However, the assessment of instrumental activities of daily living has been shown to discriminate executive dysfunction more effectively. An instrument for assessing executive dysfunction in more complex activities that is easy to handle in acute care is consequently required for clinical use. The Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) was recently introduced into Sweden. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concurrent validity of the EFPT in acute care for patients with mild stroke.

    Method: Twenty-three patients from an acute stroke unit were assessed with both the EFPT and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS).

    Results: The correlation between the EFPT and the AMPS assessments was highly significant (p = 0.003) and the concurrent validity was rho = 0.61.

    Conclusion: Since there is a risk that adult patients with mild stroke are discharged without rehabilitation, and there is a lack of a relevant instrument for occupational therapists that discriminates executive dysfunction in acute stroke care, the EFPT may be a suitable instrument to use with these patients.

  • 3. Farr, W.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom.
    Male, I.
    Morris, C.
    Bailey, S.
    Gage, H.
    Speller, S.
    Colville, V.
    Jackson, M.
    Bremner, S.
    Memon, A.
    Therapeutic potential and ownership of commercially available consoles in children with cerebral palsy2017In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    We conducted a survey amongst families of children with cerebral palsy to ascertain the ownership and therapeutic use and potential of commercial games consoles to improve motor function.

    Method:

    Three hundred families in South East England were identified through clinical records, and were requested to complete an anonymised questionnaire.

    Results:

    A total of 61 families (20% response) returned a completed questionnaire with 41 (68%) identified males and 19 (32%) identified females with cerebral palsy, with a mean age of 11 years 5 months (SD 3Y 7M). The large majority of families, 59 (97%), owned a commercial console and the child used this for 50-300 minutes a week. Returns by severity of motor impairment were: Gross Motor Function Classification System I (22%), II (32%), III (13%), IV (15%), V (18%). Consoles were used regularly for play across all Gross Motor Function Classification System categories.

    Conclusion:

    The potential of games consoles, as home-based virtual reality therapy, in improving the motor function of children with cerebral palsy should be appropriately tested in a randomised controlled trial. Wide ownership, and the relative ease with which children engage in the use of commercially-based virtual reality therapy systems, suggests potential as a means of augmenting therapy protocols, taking advantage of interest and participation patterns of families.

  • 4.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Beaton, L.
    Moore, D.
    Warren, L.
    Wick, V.
    Sanford, J. E.
    Santosh, P.
    Clinical incidence of sensory integration difficulties in adults with learning disabilities and illustration of management2003In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 66, no 10, p. 454-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This project investigated the prevalence of sensory processing problems in a clinical group and also examined the clinical effectiveness of a specialised therapeutic technique, sensory integrative therapy (SIT), in the treatment of maladaptive behaviours in two adults with learning disabilities. The Sensory Integration Inventory - Revised for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (SII-R, Reisman and Hanschu 1992) was used to identify two clients suspected of having poor sensory processing. A single-subject experimental design (ABAB) was used to assist the objective measurement of the effects of SIT. The results suggest that the SII-R has some limitations in identifying clients who would benefit from SIT. One client (Ms D) was seen to instigate more positive interactions with her environment during and following the treatment phases; however, the overhabituated behaviours of the other client (Mr K) showed little response to SIT. These results are discussed in the form of a practitioner's update, with respect to the indicators of sensory processing dysfunction and the potential therapeutic benefits of SIT as an adjunct to therapeutic interventions for individuals with learning disabilities.

  • 5.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Bishop, T.
    Wilson, B. N.
    Crawford, S.
    Hooper, R.
    Kaplan, B.
    Baird, G.
    Is questionnaire-based screening part of the solution to waiting lists for children with developmental coordination disorder?2005In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 2-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken to determine whether questionnaire-based screening could be part of the solution to a long waiting list of referrals for occupational therapy assessment by identifying the requirement for clinical assessments. The performance of two questionnaires - the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ) completed by parents and the Checklist of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (C-ABC) completed by teachers - was compared with a more traditional clinical assessment for the identification of DCD in children already referred to occupational therapy. It was found that the parent report was quite reliable in the identification of DCD if no other developmental problem was present. However, there was little benefit to using the teacher report to screen children. Several confounding variables, including an unequal proportion of children with DCD in the sample and the inclusion of children who were younger than the age range of the DCDQ, may have influenced how well the questionnaires performed. Although questionnaires cannot replace a full clinical assessment, the results showed that there may be some value in including the parent report in the identification of DCD.

  • 6. Martini, R.
    et al.
    Mandich, A.
    Green, Dido
    Oxford Brookes University, Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Implementing a modified cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance approach for use in a group format2014In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 214-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance is an intervention approach that is often used with children with developmental coordination disorder, and is usually implemented using an individual intervention format. This practice analysis describes two experiences of the cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance approach, modified for use in a group format: An intensive day-camp, and a weekly after-school club. The group format provided children with various opportunities (for example, helping other children and realizing that different 'plans' work for different people) and challenges (for example, maintaining both children's engagement during problem solving and heterogeneity in children's breakdowns). Cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance in a group format is feasible and has the potential to encourage skill acquisition for a greater number of children with developmental coordination disorder.

  • 7.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, CQ University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia .
    Review papers: Getting the best occupational therapy evidence into practice2017In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 143-144Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    The model of human occupation's usefulness in relation to sustainable development2014In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 165-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is general agreement that global climate changes are one of the greatest threats to humanity. Therefore, occupational therapists should use their knowledge about occupations to contribute to the ecological aspect of sustainable development. Similarly, when working with clients, therapists' occupational perspective can expand to include an ecological dimension. A conceptual framework would be valuable and, while empirical research is required, it would appear that the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) is useful in this context.

  • 9.
    Yazdani, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Oxford Brookes University.
    Stringer, Amy
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Occupational Therapists’ Reflections On Transferring Their Learning From A Therapeutic Relationships Workshop Into Practice2019In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 82, no 8, SI, p. 126-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research aim: The aim was to explore the experience of practising occupational therapists in transferring their learning from the Mindful Therapeutic Relationship (MTR) workshop into their own clinical practice. The workshop was developed based on the Intentional Relationship Model (Taylor 2008) and focuses on therapists being aware and mindful of the therapeutic relationship processes that occur during and after intervention.

    Research design: Thirteen occupational therapists participated in the workshop and subsequently completed between one and four reflection notes. These notes were subjected to a qualitative thematic analysis.

    Research method: Participants of the workshop were asked to write a weekly reflection for a period of four–six weeks to submit to the researcher. Thematic analysis strategies (Guest et al 2012) were used.

    Results: The findings were organised into three themes: therapeutic relationship reasoning, barriers to implementing the current learning and facilitators of transferring theory into practice.

    Conclusions: The therapists value learning and practising strategies that can support therapeutic relationships. Reflection skills seem essential for establishing and developing therapeutic relationships; such skills may need to be facilitated by the work environment.

1 - 9 of 9
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