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  • 1.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hening, Gunnel
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Occupational therapists' perceptions of gender – a focus group study2010In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 331-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Women and men are shaped over the courses of their lives by culture, society and human interaction according to the gender system. Cultural influences on individuals’ social roles and environment are described in occupational therapy literature, but not specifically from a gender perspective. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how a sample of occupational therapists perceives the ‘gender’ concept.

    Method: Four focus group interviews with 17 occupational therapists were conducted. The opening question was: ‘How do you reflect on the encounter with a client depending on whether it is a man or a woman?’ The transcribed interviews were analysed and two main themes emerged: ‘the concept of gender is tacit in occupational therapy’ and ‘client encounters’.

    Results: The occupational therapists expressed limited theoretical knowledge of ‘gender’. Furthermore, the occupational therapists seemed to be ‘doing gender’ in their encounters with the clients. For example, in their assessment of the client, they focussed their questions on different spheres: with female clients, on the household and family; with male clients, on their paid work.

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that occupational therapists were unaware of the possibility that they were ‘doing gender’ in their encounters with clients. There is a need to increase occupational therapists’ awareness of their own behaviour of ‘doing gender’. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate whether gendered perceptions will shorten or lengthen a rehabilitation period and affect the chosen interventions, and in the end, the outcome for the clients.

  • 2.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. AFR. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Embryos of Occupational Therapist Paradigms: an exploratory study of Swedish occupational therapy students' perceptions of occupational therapy1999In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 12-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study has an explorative design with its starting point in Törnebohm´s theory of paradigms. The aim of this study was to identify and describe how newly enrolled occupational therapy students perceived their future profession, especially regarding world view and field of action view. Written data were collected using essay questions. Data analysis/synthesis were accomplished qualitatively. Three themes were identified in the material: Notions of some concepts fundamental to occupational therapy; Notions of the “setting” of occupational therapy reality and Notions of the operational reality of occupational therapy. With their limited personal experience of occupational therapy, the students´ conceptions reflected interested outsiders´ views on the topic, influenced by information available in society and the questions given. They were shown to possess relevant and varied information about occupational therapy, but had difficulties in designating the different phenomena.

  • 3.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. AFR. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Occupational therapy students' paradigms: A passage from beholder to practitioner.2000In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study has an explorative, comparative design with its starting point in Törnebohm´s theory of paradigms. The aim of the study was to identify and describe how qualified OT students perceived their future profession, especially regarding world view and field of action view, and to compare their conceptions with those of newly enrolled OT students in order to find out the differences and similarities between the two aggregations of paradigms. Data were collected in writing, using essay questions. Data analysis/synthesis was accomplished qualitatively. The comparision between the two groups was carried out through the structure of three themes with appurtenant categories. The qualified occupational therapist students´ notions gave expression to a constant application of a holistic health perspective which in contrast to those of the newly enrolled occupational therapist students resulted in numerous examples of interrelations between themes belonging to different paradigm components. In line with Törnebohm (1987) this is characteristic for paradigms.

  • 4.
    Björklund, Anita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Svensson, Tommy
    A Longitudinal Study on the Transformation of Fifteen Occupational Therapist Students' Paradigms into Occupational Therapists' Paradigms.2006In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 87-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the transformation of 15 occupational therapist students’ paradigms into occupational therapists’ paradigms according to Törnebohm’s theory of paradigms, over a period of six years. This research particularly considers the paradigm components world view and field of action view in Törnbohm’s sense. Qualitative data were collected using essay-questions on three occasions: first week, and last semester, at the Occupational Therapy Programme at the School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden, and after three years of occupational therapy practice. A content-analysis of the collected materials was performed and the transformation of the informants’ views could be characterized as comprising three different perspectives: a ‘public’ view in 1995, a ‘theoretical’ view in 1998 and an ‘experiential/contextual’ view in 2001.

  • 5.
    Fields, Sally M.
    et al.
    Occupational Therapy, School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Occupational Therapy, School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Revision of the Competency Standards for Occupational Therapy Driver Assessors: An overview of the evidence for the inclusion of cognitive and perceptual assessments within fitness-to-drive evaluations2017In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 328-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Determination of fitness-to-drive after illness or injury is a complex process typically requiring a comprehensive driving assessment, including off-road and on-road assessment components. The competency standards for occupational therapy driver assessors (Victoria, Australia) define the requirements for performance of a comprehensive driving assessment, and we are currently revising these. Assessment of cognitive and perceptual skills forms an important part of the off-road assessment. The aim of this systematic review of systematic reviews (known as an overview) is to identify what evidence exists for including assessment of cognitive and perceptual skills within fitness-to-drive evaluations to inform revision of the competency standards.

    Methods: Five electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, OT Seeker) were systematically searched. Systematic review articles were appraised by two authors for eligibility. Methodological quality was independently assessed using the AMSTAR tool. Narrative analysis was conducted to summarise the content of eligible reviews.

    Results: A total of 1228 results were retrieved. Fourteen reviews met the inclusion criteria. Reviews indicated that the components of cognition and perception most frequently identified as being predictive of fitness-to-drive were executive function (n = 13), processing speed (n = 12), visuospatial skills, attention, memory and mental flexibility (n = 11). Components less indicative were perception, concentration (n = 10), praxis (n = 9), language (n = 7) and neglect (n = 6).

    Conclusion: This overview of systematic reviews supports the inclusion of assessment of a range of cognitive and perceptual skills as key elements in a comprehensive driver assessment and therefore should be included in the revised competency standards for occupational therapy driver assessors. 

  • 6.
    Gribble, Nigel
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Donlau, Marie
    Linköping, Landstinget i Östergötland, Vuxenhabiliteringen, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Predictors of time to complete toileting for children with spina bifida2013In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Previous research has shown that children with spina bifida use clean intermittent catheterisation for urination, a rather complex procedure that increases the time taken to completion. However, no studies have analysed the factors impacting on the time taken to complete the urination that could inform occupational therapy practice. Therefore, the aim was to identify the variables that predict extended time children with spina bifida take to complete urination.

    Methods: Fifty children, aged 5–18 years old with spina bifida using clean intermittent catheterisation, were observed while toileting and responding to a set of assessments tools, among them the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A logistic regression was used to identify which variables were independently associated with an extended toileting time.

    Results: Children with spina bifida do take long time to urinate. More than half of this study's participants required more than five minutes completing urination, but not all required extended times. Ambulant, independent girls were more likely to perform toileting in less than six minutes compared with other children with spina bifida. However, age, IQ, maintained focus on the task, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, time processing abilities and self-reported ratings of independence appeared to be of no relevance, to predict extended toileting times.

    Conclusion: To minimise occupational disruption caused by extended toileting times, occupational therapists should utilise the relevant predictors: gender, independence and ambulation when they prioritise children for relevant interventions.

  • 7.
    Gunnarsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    FoU-avdelningen, Kronobergs läns landsting.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Sustainable enhancement in clients who perceive the Tree Theme Method (R) as a positive intervention in psychosocial occupational therapy2013In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 154-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: The Tree Theme Method® is an intervention based on creative activities and occupational storytelling. The Tree Theme Method® implies that the clients draw and paint trees symbolising various periods in their life. The pictures are then used as a starting point to tell their life story to enhance their wellbeing and management of their everyday life. This study aimed to evaluate if changes observed among clients regarding their wellbeing and everyday occupations, between baseline and the end of their term of the Tree Theme Method® therapy, persisted three years after the completion of the intervention.

    Methods: This study had a quantitative design. Thirty-one former clients were recruited to a follow-up three years after completing the intervention. Self-rating questionnaires were used regarding psychological symptoms, self-mastery, sense of coherence, activity level, occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance. Non-parametric methods were used for the data analysis.

    Results: The findings revealed positive significant changes regarding sense of coherence and occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance, measured between the end of the intervention and at the time of the three-year follow-up. Furthermore, the respondents' ratings regarding psychological symptoms, self-mastery, activity level and the extent of satisfaction with performed occupations were found to be stable.

    Conclusions: The Tree Theme Method® appeared to function well as an intervention in psychosocial occupational therapy, where the aim was that a client would enhance their wellbeing and management of their everyday life. However, there is need for further evaluation to assess the effects of the Tree Theme Method® intervention.

  • 8.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Bentley, Western Australia.
    Murray, Nina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Bentley, Western Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Bentley, Western Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Bentley, Western Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Bentley, Western Australia.
    Pilot of the BOOST-A™: An online transition planning program for adolescents with autism2017In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 448-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many adolescents with autism face difficulties with the transition from high school into post-school activities. The Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A™) is an online transition planning program which supports adolescents on the autism spectrum to prepare for leaving school. This study describes the development of the BOOST-A™ and aimed to determine the feasibility and viability of the program.

    Methods: Two pilot studies were conducted. In Pilot A, the BOOST-A™ was trialled by six adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents, and the professionals who worked with them, to determine its feasibility. In Pilot B, 88 allied health professionals (occupational therapists, speech pathologists, and psychologists) reviewed the BOOST-A™ to determine its viability.

    Results: Participants rated the BOOST-A™ as a feasible tool for transition planning. The majority of allied health professionals agreed that it was a viable program. Based on participant feedback, the BOOST-A™ was modified to improve usability and feasibility.

    Conclusion: The BOOST-A™ is a viable and feasible program that has the potential to assist adolescents with autism in preparing for transitioning out of high school. Future research will determine the effectiveness of the BOOST-A™ with adolescents across Australia. 

  • 9.
    Henning, Belindi
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia .
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia .
    Wilkes-Gillan, Sarah
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, North Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Bentley, Australia.
    A pilot play-based intervention to improve the social play interactions of children with autism spectrum disorder and their typically developing playmates2016In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 223-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Occupational therapists play a key role in addressing the social difficulties of children with ASD. However, interventions are often time intensive, without outcomes generalising beyond the clinic setting. To examine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an intervention to address the social play skills of children with ASD.

    Methods: Participants in this multiple case study design were five children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), five typically developing playmates and five parents of children with ASD. Two therapists and parents delivered the intervention involving clinic play sessions and home modules. Parents' treatment adherence was recorded. The Test of Playfulness was scored by a blinded rater to examine child outcomes following the intervention. Line graphs were used to examine case data. Percentage of non-overlapping data (PND) was used to calculate the single-case effect size for each child.

    Results: Parents completed 92.2% of the intervention. Children's case data showed an upwards trend from pre- to post-intervention in four of the five pairs (child with ASD and playmate). However, there was a decrease in scores from post-intervention to the two-month home follow-up for all but one pair. PND indicated the intervention was effective for two children with ASD and three of their playmates, had a questionable effect on three children with ASD and no observable effect on two playmates.

    Conclusion: The intervention demonstrated preliminary feasibility and effectiveness for improving the social play skills of some children with ASD. Careful consideration is needed to identify which children with ASD and which playmates would be best suited for this intervention approach. 

  • 10.
    Håkansson, Carita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Eklund, Mona
    Inst för hälsa, vård och samhälle, Avd för arbetsterapi och gerontologi, Lunds universitet.
    Associations between women's subjective perceptions of daily occupations and life satisfaction, and the role of perceived control2011In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 397-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIM:

    More knowledge is needed about the role of perceived control in the associations between different perceptions of daily occupations and positive health outcomes. The aim was to explore the associations between different subjective perceptions of daily occupations, in terms of occupational balance, occupational meaning, occupational value and satisfaction with occupations, and life satisfaction, and the role of perceived control in those associations.

    METHODS:

    A questionnaire including questions about perceptions of daily occupations, perceived control and life satisfaction were answered by a random sample of 488 middle-aged Swedish women. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to test the associations between perceptions of daily occupations and life satisfaction, and the role of perceived control.

    RESULTS:

    After adjustments for perceived control women who perceived a high level of satisfaction with work and leisure, occupational balance, occupational meaning and occupational value perceived greater life satisfaction than the other women. Perceived control was not significant in the model.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    It seems that occupational balance and occupational meaning were pivotal for the women's life satisfaction, but satisfaction with work and leisure, as well as perceived occupational value, was also of importance. The assumption that perceived control would have a role in the association between perceptions of occupations and life satisfaction was not confirmed.

    SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY:

    The results indicate that occupational therapists need to focus on occupational balance, occupational meaning, occupational value and satisfaction with work and leisure to promote positive health outcomes, in terms of life satisfaction, when working with middle-aged female clients.

  • 11.
    Imms, Christine
    et al.
    Australian Catholic University, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation: Are we there yet...2014In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 291-292Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallin, Sara W.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Intervention in time-processing ability, daily time management and autonomy in children with intellectual disabilities aged 10–17 years – A cluster randomised trial2019In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim

    Difficulties with management of time are frequently observed in children and youth with intellectual disabilities (IDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate a new intervention programme ‘My Time’ to improve time‐processing ability (TPA) in children with IDs aged 10–17 years (n = 61).

    Methods

    Cluster randomised and waiting‐list control group design was used. Data collection included the Kit for assessment of TPA, the Time‐Parent scale and a self‐rating of autonomy to assess occupational performance in daily life. The method was implemented over an 8‐week period. Effect size (ES) was calculated and an analysis of covariance on the individual level and a two‐stage process on the cluster level.

    Results

    The estimated mean improvement in the KaTid‐Child score from baseline (t1) to t2 was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the waiting‐list group, ES Cohen's d = 0.64.

    Conclusion

    The results present first evidence of the effectiveness of a new occupational therapy intervention programme (‘My Time’) to facilitate TPA in children with mild to moderate IDs. Children with IDs aged 10–17 years could improve their TPA at a measurable pace when given intervention. The method could complement interventions using time‐assistive devices. Children with IDs should be identified to guide intervention. Further research is necessary to establish whether using the intervention programme can facilitate the development of TPA in younger children.

  • 13.
    Sansonetti, Danielle
    et al.
    Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation Centre, Caulfield Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Nicks, Rebecca J.
    Occupational Therapy Department, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Health, Medical and Applied Science, Central Queensland University, QLD, Australia.
    Barriers and enablers to aligning rehabilitation goals to patient life roles following acquired brain injury2018In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 512-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Life roles are integral to occupational therapy practice. Goal setting is a method of establishing priorities to measure outcomes. While acquired brain injury can impact a person's ability to fulfil meaningful life roles, the alignment of goals set in rehabilitation to life roles, is unclear. This study aimed to (i) explore the alignment of goals with life roles for people with an acquired brain injury participating in inpatient rehabilitation; and (ii) identify barriers and enablers to life role discussions within a patient-directed goal setting framework.

    Method: A mixed-methods study was conducted on an inpatient rehabilitation unit in Victoria, Australia. Quantitative data were obtained from a retrospective file audit of randomly selected medical records. Qualitative data were collected through: a) interviews with patients and their families; and b) A focus group with occupational therapists. Thematic analysis of both audit data and narrative data was undertaken.

    Results: Thirty files were examined and demonstrated 33% alignment between goals and life roles. Four interviews were completed with patients, with a family member participating in two of these. Themes identified were: readiness, role concept, recovery concept and goal review. Five therapists attended the focus group. Themes identified were: Patient factors, goal review, expectations, role change and environment. Interview and focus group data identified that barriers to life role discussions included: lack of patient and family readiness, patients’ difficulty understanding role concept, focus on impairments and lack of family/ significant others support. Enablers included: having early conversations involving family, regular goal review and use of standardised tools.

    Conclusion: Goal setting in alignment with life roles is important in acquired brain injury rehabilitation, but may be limited. This process can be enhanced by including patients and their significant others in early goal setting conversations, along with regular goal review across the rehabilitation process. 

  • 14.
    Sjödin, Linda
    et al.
    Paediatric Clinic, Landstinget Kronoberg, SE, Ljungby, Sweden.
    Buchanan, Angus
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Mundt, Beate
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Karlsson, Emelie
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Do vehicle grants and vehicle adaptations grants promote transport mobility and community access for children with disabilities in Sweden?2012In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIM: A vast majority of the journeys made by children with disabilities in Sweden are in the family car, which usually is bought and adapted for the child with governmental subsidies. Despite the important philosophical views about accessible vehicles, little is known about the impact of vehicle adaptations on families' lives. The aim of the study was to investigate parent views about the impact of vehicle grants and vehicle adaptation grants on their children's transport mobility and community access.

    METHODS: In total, 434 parents of children with disabilities in Sweden who had received vehicle grants and/or vehicle adaptation grants between 1998-2007 responded to a questionnaire comprising questions with both pre-selected and open-ended answers. A non-responder analysis was performed.

    RESULTS: Children with disabilities were found to increase their transport mobility and community access in society as vehicle grants and/or vehicle adaptation grants were given to their parents. Their travel patterns and their travel priorities with their family car indicated that family friends and relatives and leisure activities were frequently visited and prioritised destinations. The grants were linked to access to social and family activities, provided environmental gains and led to increased experienced security. The results also showed that the potential to make spontaneous trips had increased substantially and that families experienced feelings of freedom and enhanced community access. The non-responder analysis confirmed these results.

    CONCLUSIONS: According to parents, vehicle grants and vehicle adaptation grants for children with disabilities have a positive impact on the children's transport mobility and community access.

  • 15.
    Townsend, K.
    et al.
    Austin Health.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Central Queensland University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    The inter-rater reliability of the Powered Mobility Device Assessment Training Tool2019In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 393-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    The prescription of powered mobility devices for clients is an important role for occupational therapists. However, the skill of may powered mobility device users to drive their devices remains unknown and clients are provided with only brief education on their use. Few assessments exist to guide mobility device use assessment, and none of these incorporate the training clients need. The aim of this paper was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of a new assessment and training tool called the Powered Mobility Device Assessment Training Tool (PoMoDATT).

    Method:

    The PoMoDATT comprises an initial interview and then Part A- cognitive skills, Part B physical and psychosocial skills and Part C driving skills and behaviours. The assessment outcome is a profile of the client's physical, cognitive and psychosocial skills related to powered mobility device use. The driving assessments of 24 powered mobility device users were video-recorded, and four experienced occupational therapists scored the clients on the 26 items of Part C of the PoMoDATT.

    Results:

    Following clarification of three items which included re-scoring and data re-analysis, the inter-rater reliability for the PoMoDATT Part C items ranged from ICC (2, 1) 0.641 to 0.938 suggesting moderate to excellent agreement.

    Conclusions:

    The PoMoDATT Part C has demonstrated adequate inter-rater reliability to support its use by occupational therapists to assess powered mobility device user's capacities and abilities and to highlight ongoing training needs.

  • 16.
    Unsworth, Carolyn A.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science. La Trobe Univ, Sch Occupat Therapy, Dept Occupat Therapy, Melbourne, Vic 3086, Australia.
    Baker, Anne
    Royal Childrens Hosp, Occupat Therapy Dept, Parkville, Vic 3052, Australia.
    Taitz, Carla
    EPIC Ctr, Bundoora, Vic, Australia.
    Chan, Siew-Pang
    La Trobe Univ, Div Hlth Res, Melbourne, Vic 3086, Australia.
    Pallant, Julie F.
    Univ Melbourne, Sch Rural Hlth, Shepparton, Vic, Australia.
    Russell, Kay J.
    Austin Hlth Heidelberg Repatriat Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Odell, Morris
    Monash Univ, Victorian Inst Forens Med, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia.
    Development of a standardised Occupational Therapy - Driver Off-Road Assessment Battery to assess older and/or functionally impaired drivers2012In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 23-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Research has been conducted over several years to develop a new off-road assessment battery referred to as the Occupational Therapy - Driver Off-Road Assessment Battery. This article documents the development of the Battery, and provides preliminary research evidence to support its content and predictive validity. Methods: Literature reviews and a focus group with nine driver assessor occupational therapists were undertaken, as well as data collection using the Occupational Therapy Driver Off-Road Assessment Battery with 246 clients. A Classification and Regression Tree model was constructed to ascertain the predictive validity of the Battery, with fitness- to-drive as the outcome. Results: Twenty-one physical, 13 sensory and seven assessments of cognition / perception were identified as being reflective of the skills required for driving. Following rating of their psychometric properties, the best assessments were presented to focus group members. The driver assessors supported the inclusion of several assessments and encouraged the development of new assessments. A draft version of the Occupational Therapy -Driver Off-Road Assessment Battery was tested and found to have excellent predictive validity for client on-road performance of 82.6%. The Classification and Regression Tree model showed that client performance on tests included in the Battery should be used together, rather than in isolation, to support fitness-to-drive recommendations. Conclusion: This research identified the most suitable physical, sensory and cognitive assessments to include in the Occupational Therapy -Driver Off-Road Assessment Battery, and provided support for its validity. The development of this standardised battery assists driver assessors to accurately and consistently assess and report the offroad driving capacity of clients.

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