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  • 1. Albinsson, A
    et al.
    Krantz, Margaretha
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Lundvall, A
    Engberg, IB
    Proportion of Swedish school nurses' time devoted to different health care activities1996In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Antonsson, Helen
    et al.
    Eriksson Korjonen, Susanne
    Rosengren, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    First-line managers’ experiences of alternative modes of funding in elderly care in Sweden2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 737-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe first-line managers’ experiences of alternative modes of funding elderly care in two communities in western Sweden.

     Background: A growing elderly population demands alternative modes of funding elderly care for better outcomes for patients and better efficiency as it is publicly funded through taxation.

     Methods: The study comprised a total of eight semi-structured interviews with first-line managers working within elderly care. The interviews were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Respect for the individuals was a main concern in the study.

     Results: One category, quality improvement, and four subcategories freedom of choice, organisational structure, quality awareness and market forces effects were identified to describe first-line managers’ experiences of the operation of elderly care.

     Conclusions: Quality improvement was an important factor to deal with when elderly care was operated in different organisational perspectives, either private or public. The first-line manager is a key person for developing a learning organisation that encourages both staff, clients and their relatives to improve the organisation. Moreover, person-centred care strengthens the client’s role in the organisation, which is in line with the government’s goal for the quality improvement of elderly care. However, further research is needed on how quality improvement could be developed when different caregivers operate in the same market in order to improve care from the elderly perspective.

    Implications for nursing management: This study highlights alternative modes of funding elderly care. The economical perspectives should not dominate without taking care of quality improvement when the operation of elderly care is planned and implemented. Strategies such as a learning organisational structure built on person-centred care could create quality improvement in elderly care.

  • 3. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lunds universitet.
    Factors influencing nurse supervisor competence: a critical incident analysis study2005In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 231-237Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Löfgren, H
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how a group supervision programme in nursing care influences their professional competence: a 4-year follow-up study2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Löfgren, H
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how group supervision in nursing care influences their professional competence2000In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Skärsäter, I
    Oijervall, J
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Process-oriented group supervision implemented during nursing education: nurses' conceptions 1 year after their nursing degree2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 868-875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the variation in how nurses conceive process-oriented group supervision, implemented during nursing education, 1 year after their nursing degree. BACKGROUND: Process-oriented group supervision can be an effective support system for helping nursing students and nurses to reflect on their activities. METHODS: A descriptive qualitative design was chosen for the study. Conceptions were collected through interviews with 18 strategically selected Swedish nurses in 2005. RESULTS: Three descriptive categories comprising seven conceptions were emerged. Supportive actions comprised: a sense of security, belonging and encouragement. Learning actions involved: sharing and reflecting while developmental actions described: enabling professional identity and facilitating personal development. CONCLUSIONS: Process-oriented group supervision has a lasting influence on nurses' development. The possibility to reflect over new stances during nursing education was a prerequisite for the provision of high-quality care. Process-oriented group supervision can make an important contribution to nursing education. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Process-oriented group supervision provides nurses with the strength to achieve resilience to stress in their work. It may lead to autonomy as well as clarity in the nurse's professional function. This indicates the need for nurse managers to organize reflective group supervision as an integral part of the nurse's work.

  • 7. Boström, B
    et al.
    Hinic, H
    Lundberg, D
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Pain and health-related quality of life among cancer patients in final stage of life: a comparison between two palliative care teams2003In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Boström, B
    et al.
    Ramberg, T
    Davies, BD
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Survey of post-operative patients' pain management1997In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Godfrey, Marjorie M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Nelson, Eugene C.
    Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences and Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Coaching interprofessional health care improvement teams: the coachee, the coach and the leader perspectives2014In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 452-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate health care improvement team coaching activities from the perspectives of coachees, coaches and unit leaders in two national improvement collaboratives.

    BACKGROUND: Despite numerous methods to improve health care, inconsistencies in success have been attributed to factors that include unengaged staff, absence of supportive improvement resources and organisational inertia.

    METHODS: Mixed methods sequential exploratory study design, including quantitative and qualitative data from interprofessional improvement teams who received team coaching. The coachees (n = 382), coaches (n = 9) and leaders (n = 30) completed three different data collection tools identifying coaching actions perceived to support improvement activities.

    RESULTS: Coachees, coaches and unit leaders in both collaboratives reported generally positive perceptions about team coaching. Four categories of coaching actions were perceived to support improvement work: context, relationships, helping and technical support.

    CONCLUSIONS: All participants agreed that regardless of who the coach is, emphasis should include the four categories of team coaching actions.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Leaders should reflect on their efforts to support improvement teams and consider the four categories of team coaching actions. A structured team coaching model that offers needed encouragement to keep the team energized, seems to support health care improvement.

  • 10.
    Hedberg, Berith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Avd. för Beteendevetenskap, LiU.
    Johanson, Marita
    Universitetet Trollhättan-Uddevalla.
    Care-planning meetings with stroke survivors: nurses as moderators of the communication2007In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 214-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Stroke survivors often have communicative disabilities. They should, however, be involved when decisions are made about their care treatment.

    Aim: To explore and describe how nurses act as moderators of the communication in cooperative care-planning meetings and what kind of participant status the patients achieve in this type of multi-party talk.

    Method: Thirteen care-planning meetings were audio-recorded and transcribed. Nurses, social workers and stroke survivors were the main participants for the meetings. A coding scheme was created and three main categories were used for the analysis: pure utterance types, expert comments (EC) and asymmetries. Results The nurses never invited the patients to tell their own versions without possible influence from them. Mostly the nurses gave ECs. The nurses acted as the patients' advocates by talking for or about them. They rarely supported the patients' utterances.

    Conclusion: There is an urgent need for nurses to learn how to involve the patients in the communicative process about their treatment. Assessment of the patients' communicative abilities before the care-planning meetings as well as knowledge about how to invite them can improve the patients' participant status.

  • 11. Marklund, B
    et al.
    Ström, M
    Månsson, J
    Borgquist, L
    Baigi, A
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Computer-supported telephone nurse triage: an evaluation of medical quality and costs2007In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate a telephone nurse triage model in terms of appropriateness of referrals to the appropriate level of care, patient's compliance with given advice and costs. Background: A key concern in each telephonic consultation is to evaluate if appropriate. Method: An evaluative design in primary health care with consecutive patients ( N = 362) calling telephone nurse triage between November 2002 and February 2003. Results: The advice was considered adequate in 325 (97.6%) cases. The patients’ compliance with self-care was 81.3%, to primary health care 91.1% and to Accident and Emergency department 100%. The nurses referred self-care cases (64.7%) and Accident and Emergency cases (29.6%) from a less adequate to an appropriate level of care. The cost saving per call leading to a recommendation of self-care was €70.3, to primary health care €24.3 and to Accident and Emergency department €22.2. Conclusions The telephone nurse triage model showed adequate guidance for the patients concerning level of care and released resources for the benefit of both patients and the health care system.

  • 12.
    Munck, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    District nurses´ conceptions of medical technology in palliative home care2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 845-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  The aim of this study was to describe district nurses’ conceptions of medical technology in palliative homecare.

    Background  Medical technology has, in recent years, been widely used in palliative homecare. Personnel with varying degrees of training and knowledge must be able to handle the new technology.

    Methods  A descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach was chosen to describe qualitatively different conceptions of the phenomenon medical technology. Interviews with 16 district nurses working with palliative homecare were analysed and five descriptive categories emerged.

    Results  Medical technology in palliative homecare led to vulnerability because of increasing demands and changing tasks. When medical technology was used in the home it demanded collaboration between all involved actors. It also demanded self-reliance and an awareness of managing medical technology in a patient-safe way. Medical technology provided freedom for the palliative patients.

    Conclusions  To maintain patient safety, more education and collaboration with palliative care teams is needed. Next-of-kin are considered as an important resource but their participation must be based on their own conditions.

    Implications for nursing management  District nurses need regular training on medical devices, must be more specialized in this kind of care and must not fragment their working time within other specialities.

  • 13.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Handling a challenging context: experiences of facilitating evidence-based elderly care2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 201-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore improvement facilitators' experiences of handling their commission to implement evidence-based practice in elderly care for frail older persons.

    Background

    Improvement facilitators were put in place across Sweden in a time-limited project by the government, with one part of the project being to evaluate the model before establishing this facilitation of evidence-based practice in elderly care.

    Method

    Two focus groups were interviewed twice. Each group comprised three respondents. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Findings

    A main theme, ‘Moving forward by adjusting to the circumstances’, described how the improvement facilitators handle their commitment. Five subthemes emerged: identifying barriers, keeping focus, maintaining motivation, building bridges and finding balance.

    Conclusion

    The improvement facilitators' commitment is ambiguous because of unclear leadership of, and responsibility for the national investment. They have to handle leaders' different approaches and justify the need for evidence-based practice. The improvement facilitators did not reflect on the impact of programme adaptations on evidence-based practice.

    Implications for nursing management

    The findings emphasise the need for collaboration between the improvement facilitator and the nurse manager. To fully implement evidence-based practice, negotiations with current practitioners for adaptation to local conditions are necessary. Furthermore, the value of improving organisational performance needs to be rigorously communicated throughout the organisation.

  • 14. Paulsson, G
    et al.
    Nederfors, T
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Conceptions of oral health among nurse managers: a qualitative analysis1999In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 299-306Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Persson, Maria
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Situations influencing habits in diet and exercise among nurses working night shift.2006In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 414-423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Rosengren, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Presence and availability: staff conceptions of nursing leadership on an intensive care unit.2007In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 522-529Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Rosengren, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Engström, A K
    Axelsson, L
    The staff's experience of structural changes in the health and medical service in western Sweden1999In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 289-298Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Rosengren, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Höglund, Pär J.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Quality registry, a tool for patient advantages - from a preventive caring perspective2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 196-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of a recently implemented quality register, Senior Alert, at two hospitals in Sweden.

    Background: In Sweden, in recent decades, a system of national quality registries has been established in health and medical services for better outcomes for patients, professional development and a better functioning system. Senior Alert (SA) is one quality registry, aimed at preventing malnutrition, pressure ulcers and falls in elderly care.

    Methods: The study comprised a total of eight interviews with nurses working with SA at the ward level. The interviews were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Respect for the individuals was a main concern in the study. All persons who were asked to participate in the study consented to do so.

    Results: One category 'Patient Advantages' and three subcategories 'Conscious Persevering', 'Supporting Structure' and 'Committed Leadership' were identified to describe staff experiences of implementing SA.

    Conclusions: Implementation processes need to be sustainable at both staff and managerial levels. A key factor in implementing and using a quality registry in prevention care could be described as keeping the flame burning. However, further research is needed on how patient advantages could be developed using other quality registries in order to improve care from a patient perspective.

    Implications for nursing management: The results of this study could help other organizations implement quality registries or other change processes, for example new guidelines and treatment. Strategies concerning organizational structure and committed leadership could increase the usefulness of knowledge systems on all levels, which could enable continuous learning and quality improvement in health care.

  • 19.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Views on health information and perceptions of standardized electronic records among staff in Child and School Health Services2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 201-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate how nurses and physicians in the Child and School Health Services view the documentation and transfer of health information. Another aim concerns their perceptions of a nationally standardized electronic health record.

    BACKGROUND: Problems of mental health among children and adolescents currently pose one of the greatest challenges facing all European countries. The continuity of health work demands that all health information follow the child's development, disregarding the organizational arrangement.

    METHODS: The study was descriptive and comprised 484 questionnaires to nurses and physicians in the Child and School Health Services in Sweden.

    RESULTS: More information about children's health was transferred than documented in the health record when children started school. This additional health information concerned psychosocial health and foremost family function. There was a consensus concerning the usefulness of a nationally standardized electronic health record, although there were group differences between nurses and physicians.

    CONCLUSIONS: All information about children's health is not documented although the professional's positive perceptions to electronic health records may provide a basis to improve documentation.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The results indicate challenges to develop a common language to document psychosocial issues necessary for providing a holistic view of children's health.

  • 20. Ziegert, K
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Conceptions of life situation among next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 20 of 20
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