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  • 1.
    Boström, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Older persons have ambivalent feelings about the use of monitoring technologies2013In: Information Technology and Disabilities, ISSN 1073-5127, E-ISSN 1073-5127, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As they age, older persons prefer to continue to live in their own homes. Sensors in the environment and/or bodily worn systems that monitor people might contribute to an increased sense of safety and security at home, but also raise concerns about the loss of privacy by surveillance. Little is known about how older persons, living at home independently and stating good health, perceive monitoring technology in terms of personal privacy.

    OBJECTIVE: to identify and describe how older persons, perceive monitoring technology in terms of personal privacy.

    METHOD: A qualitative study based on five focus group interviews was used. Concepts of "freedom" and "surveillance" were used as content areas in the data analysis.

    RESULTS: The results comprised three categories of ambivalence; "independence vs. security", "privacy vs. intrusion", and "in the best interest of me vs. in the best interest of others". These three categories merged into the overarching theme "maintaining a sense of self" which illustrates a desire to maintain control of one's life as long as possible.

    CONCLUSIONS: Older persons generally have positive feelings and attitudes toward technology and strive to maintaining a sense of self as long as possible, by having control. They stated high value to privacy, but valued being watched over if it ensured security. To feel good and bad about monitoring technologies, rather than good or does not necessarily lead to feelings of conflict.

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