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  • 1.
    Appelin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Berterö, Carina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Patients' experiences of palliative care in the home: a phenomenological study of a Swedish sample.2004In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Browall, Maria
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden / Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gaston-Johansson, Fannie
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden / Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, United States.
    Danielson, Ella
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Postmenopausal women with breast cancer: Their experiences of the chemotherapy treatment period2006In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illustrates the experience of 20 postmenopausal women with breast cancer who had received chemotherapy treatment. The interviews were of narrative nature and analyzed with content analysis. Four themes, including 12 subthemes, described these women's life during treatment as a journey from the negative experiences of fear of the unknown, affects on body and mind, to the more positive to get by, and a transformed life. The treatment was compared with an assault on the body, and the loss of their hair was experienced more negatively than the loss of a breast. The women described a feeling of imbalance in their relationships due to lack of support from those close to them. The support from healthcare professionals was experienced both positively and negatively, and many of the women revealed variation in the professional's attitude, knowledge, and empathy. The women who chose not to work during the treatment felt pressure from society and healthcare professionals to get back to work as soon as possible. For many, especially those in a leading position, this was experienced as very difficult. The women expressed a feeling of not being afraid of dying but wanted more time to prepare themselves.

  • 3.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Institution of Health Science, University College Borås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The everyday life of the young child shortly after receiving a cancer diagnosis, from both children's and parent's perspectives2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Providing qualified, evidence-based healthcare to children requires increased knowledge of how cancer affects the young child's life. There is a dearth of research focusing on the young child's experience of everyday life.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore young children's and their parents' perceptions of how cancer affects the child's health and everyday life shortly after diagnosis.

    Methods: Thirteen children with newly diagnosed cancer aged 1 to 6 years and their parents, connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden, participated in this study through semistructured interviews. Child and parent data were analyzed as a family unit, using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Everyday life was spent at hospital or at home waiting to go back to hospital. Analysis led to the following categories: feeling like a stranger, feeling powerless, and feeling isolated.

    Conclusions: The child wants to be seen as a competent individual requiring information and participation in care. Parents need to be a safe haven for their child and not feel forced to legitimize painful and traumatic procedures by assisting with them. Nurses play a major role in the lives of children. Research with and on the young child is necessary and a way of making them visible and promoting their health and well-being.

    Implications for practice: Nurses need to reevaluate the newly diagnosed child's care routines so as to shift focus from the illness to the child. This requires competent nurses, secure in their caring role.

  • 4. Edvardsson, Tanja
    et al.
    Påhlson, Anneli
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Experiences of onset and diagnosis of low-grade glioma from the patient's perspective.2006In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 415-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe adult patients' experiences of falling ill and being diagnosed with low-grade glioma. Information concerning such experiences is lacking in the literature. The study population were adults identified within a well-defined population. Interviews were conducted with 27 patients. The interview texts were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Illness onset was described as a sequence of events. Nineteen patients narrated rapid onset and 8 patients prolonged onset. The most commonly described symptoms in both types of onset were headache, epileptic seizures, vomiting, and vision changes. Racing thoughts, depression, and tinnitus were 3 of the more uncommon symptoms. The most prominent negative experiences regarding healthcare included disrespectful encounters and a lack of opportunity for participation. The salient negative life-situation consequences included a lack of social support and attitudes expressing a lack of understanding. However, to some extent, positive experiences also emerged in the interviews concerning healthcare and life situation despite the onset of the illness. In conclusion, most of the patients in the study experienced the illness onset as stressful. Healthcare staff need particular knowledge to understand the vulnerability of the patient in the onset of low-grade glioma.

  • 5.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Berterö, Carina
    Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: Experiences Affecting Self-image, Relationships, and Present Life2010In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 33, no 1, p. E18-E24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about how young adults experience being a childhood cancer survivor is limited, as most previous research concerning the quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer has been conducted using standardized questionnaires. The aim of the current study was to identify and describe young adults' own experiences of long-term effects of cancer treatment on their self-image, relationships, and present life related to the impact of being a survivor of childhood cancer. Interviews were held with 7 young adults, 20 to 23 years of age. The verbatim-transcribed interviews were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. The core category was identified as "compensated life picture." All the negative and difficult experiences are compensated for with a positive view on and positive expectations regarding life. This core category was grounded in 5 categories: living a normal life, bodily changes, relationships with and support from others nearby, sentient life, and personal growth. The findings in this study illustrate the importance for healthcare staff to be aware of young adult survivors' experiences of their childhood cancer and its long-term effects. Extra attention and support from the healthcare system after the concluded treatment period are needed via a support program or support group for young adults.

  • 6.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Carlsson, M
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hamrin, E
    Symptom distress and life situation in adolescents with cancer1997In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Udo, Camilla
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Björk, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Ek, Kristina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E1-E11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in Swedish language.

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare FATCOD scores among Swedish nurses and nursing students with those from other languages, to explore the existence of 2 subscales, and to evaluate influences of experiences on attitudes toward care of dying patients.

    METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, and predictive design was used. The FATCOD scores of Swedish nurses from hospice, oncology, surgery clinics, and palliative home care and nursing students were compared with published scores from the United States, Israel, and Japan. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and factor and regression analyses were used.

    RESULTS: The sample consisted of 213 persons: 71 registered nurses, 42 enrolled nurses, and 100 nursing students. Swedish FATCOD mean scores did not differ from published means from the United States and Israel, but were significantly more positive than Japanese means. In line with Japanese studies, factor analyses yielded a 2-factor solution. Total FATCOD and subscales had low Cronbach α's. Hospice and palliative team nurses were more positive than oncology and surgery nurses to care for dying patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the Swedish FATCOD may comprise 2 distinct scales, the total scale may be the most adequate and applicable for use in Sweden. Professional experience was associated with nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients.

    IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Care culture might influence nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients; the benefits of education need to be explored.

  • 8.
    Högberg, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stockelberg, Dick
    Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandman, Lars
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nyström, Maria
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås.
    The meaning of web-based communication for support: From the patients' perspective within a hematological healthcare setting2015In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 145-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Being critically ill with a hematological disease is a challenge, sometimes causing a need for support in the adjustment to the stressful life situation. By providing Web-based communication for support from a nurse, patients get access to an alternative and untraditional way to communicate their issues.

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aim was to describe the meaning of using Web-based communication for support from a patient perspective.

    METHODS:

    A comprehensive randomized pilot study (n = 30) was conducted, allowing 15 patients in the experimental group to have access to the Web-based communication, to evaluate feasibility. Of these 15 participants, 10 were interviewed, focusing on their experiences. An empirical hermeneutical approach was used and the interpretive analysis focused on the meanings.

    RESULTS:

    Web-based communication for support means a space for patients to have their say, consolidation of a matter, an extended caring relationship, access to individual medical assessment, and an opportunity for emotional processing. The main interpretation indicates that the patient's influence on the communication strengthens according to the asynchronous, faceless, and written communication. The increased, and in some sense constant, access to an individual medical and caring assessment, in turn, implies a feeling of safety.

    CONCLUSION:

    Web-based communication for support seems to have the potential to enhance patients' participation on their own terms.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

    To achieve the possible advantages of Web-based communication for support, nurses must acquire knowledge about caring writing. It requires respect for the patient and articulated accuracy and attention in the response given.

  • 9.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margaretha
    et al.
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital and Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hellström, Anna-Lena
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital and Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg.
    Grief related to the experience of being the sibling of a child with cancer2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 5, p. E1-E7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have described the well siblings' experience of grief when a brother or sister is treated for cancer. Knowing how sibling grief is expressed will guide clinician and family efforts to provide appropriate support.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe siblings' reports of grief related to the experience of having a brother or sister with cancer.

    Methods: A qualitative descriptive method was chosen based on open-ended interviews with 29 siblings aged 8 to 24 years. Qualitative content analysis was applied to the interview data.

    Results: Four categories of grief were identified: anticipatory grief after receiving information about the cancer diagnosis, grief and concern about the ill sibling's loss of a normal life, grief about being unimportant and forgotten in the family, and grief that continues after the sibling's death as a kind of bond.

    Conclusion: Despite variations in age and gender among participating siblings, their thoughts were similar. Grief was experienced differently from the time of the diagnosis onward, in the form of concerns related to the illness and situation of the ill sibling. Grief related to sibling bonds remained after death.

    Implication for practice: This study recommends offering siblings realistic information about their ill sibling and support for them in their situation from diagnosis and continuously thereafter. To meet the needs of well siblings, it is necessary to ask the siblings about their thoughts and discuss with them their emotions and worries.

  • 10. von Essen, L
    et al.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Important aspects of care and assistance for siblings of children treated for cancer: a parent and nurse perspective2003In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 203-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Wideheim, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Edvardsson, Tanja
    Påhlson, Anneli
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    A family's perspective on living with a highly malignant brain tumor.2002In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to describe what it like to live with a highly malignant brain tumor from a family perspective. It is a qualitative study in which 3 families, 3 patients, and 5 next of kin have described their experiences in 15 interviews. The study is prospective, with interviews occurring 2-3 weeks after surgery and 3 and 6 months after the onset of the illness. Inductive content analysis has been employed. The results indicate that when a highly malignant brain tumor is diagnosed, the effect on the family is devastating and there is a state of crisis. Characteristically, there is distancing and a sense of helplessness. The members of the family live from day to day in a state of constant anxiety and fear of losing the patient. The affliction limits the patient's capacity regarding activities of daily life, which increases the burden of the next of kin. The next of kin attempt to cope with their grief by occupying themselves with practical tasks and activities that they believe are meaningful. The family members have only good words to say about their encounter with healthcare staff and about the information given. Negative information that the family have not asked for can cause a long period of frustration and anxiety, and they believe that their hope has been taken away from them.

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