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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    The nurse anesthetist perioperative dialog2020In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In the perioperative dialogue, pre-, intra- and postoperatively, the patient shares their history. In the dialogue, the nurse anesthetist (NA) gets to witness the patient's experiences and can alleviate the patients' suffering while waiting for, or undergoing surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the nurse anesthetist's experiences of the perioperative dialogue. Methods The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with 12 NA and analyzed with interpretive content analysis. The methods were conducted in accordance with the COREQ guidelines. Results In the result, three categories emerge: A mutual meeting (the preoperative dialogue) where the patient and the NA through contact create a relationship. The NA is present and listens to the patient, to give the patient confidence in the NA. In the category, On the basis of the patient's needs and wishes (the intraoperative dialogue), the body language of the NA, as well as the ability to read the body language of the patient, is described as important. In the category, To create a safe situation (the postoperative dialogue) the NA ensures that the patient has knowledge of what has happened and of future care in order to restore the control to the patient. Conclusion The patient is met as a person with their own needs and wishes. It includes both a physical and a mental meeting. In a genuine relationship, the NA can confirm and unreservedly talk with the patient. When the patients leave their body and life in the hands of the NA, they can help the patients to find their inherent powers, which allows for participation in their care. Understanding the patient is possible when entering in a genuine relationship with the patient and confirm the patient. The perioperative dialogue forms a safety for the patients in the operating environment.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindholm, Maria
    Pettersson, Margareta
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Nurses competencies in Home health care: An interview study2017In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses working in Home health care (HHC) are facing major challenges when more advanced care and treatment are performing in the patient’s home. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experiencing their competencies in HHC. 

    Methods: This study has a qualitative and explorative design. Ten nurses were interviewed and data were analysed by content analysis.

    Results: The themes “Being a capable nurse”, “Being a useful nurse” and “Being a subordinate and dependent nurse” were identified. Nurses want to be capable to take care of patients, develop their competencies and perform their duties in the way that are requested. They also want to be useful in their work and providing good and safe HHC. Finally, nurses want to improve the care in HHC with their competencies. Simultaneously, they are subordinate and dependent in the relation with their manager and manager’s interest to encourage nurses’ competence development.

    Conclusions: Nurses in HHC are responsible for many seriously ill patients and they want to contribute to a good and safe patient care. To maintain patient safety, reduce the risk for burnout and staff turnover as well as to contribute to a sustainable development of the work, strategies for transfer competencies between nurses and efforts for competence development are needed. 

  • 3.
    Bouwmeester Stjernetun, Björn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    ”It´s like walking in a bubble”, nursing students´ perspectives on age suit simulation in a home environment – group interviews from reflection seminars2024In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 23, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older persons with age-related and complex health problems will increasingly depend on care provision from nurses in their own homes. However, a barrier to quality care is ageism and nursing students´ disinterest in geriatrics. In addition, nurse education often falls short in preparing students for the complexity of geriatric care. Welfare technology (WT) is progressively implemented in home care to help older persons live at home despite their health problems. However, this process is intricate and requires acceptance and digital literacy among caregivers and older persons. Despite these challenges, nurse education can address and change negative attitudes through innovative teaching methods such as age suit simulation. Therefore, the study aims to describe nursing students´ experiences of age suit simulation in a home-like environment with WT and technical aids, and will reveal their perspective on ageing and providing care to older adults.

  • 4.
    Claesson, Maria
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Josefsson, Karin
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Next of kin's experiences of registered nurses' leadership close to older adults in municipal home care in Sweden: an interview study2021In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Next of kin to older adults over 65 years in municipal home care are concerned whether their older adults' needs are being met. In municipal home care, the registered nurses' leadership is important and complex, entailing multi-artist skills involving the older adults and their next of kin. Yet, little is known about next of kin's experiences of registered nurses' leadership. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore next of kin's experiences of registered nurses' leadership close to older adults in municipal home care.

    METHODS: Individual telephone interviews were conducted with next of kin (n = 11) of older adults from April to September 2020 in two municipalities in western Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The results are presented with the theme, registered nurses do what they can, including two categories, interaction and competence, and the subcategories, relationship, communication, availability, responsibility, team leadership and cooperation. Registered nurses' leadership was experienced as a balancing act between their commitments and what they were able to achieve.

    CONCLUSIONS: Next of kin's experiences of registered nurses' leadership can contribute knowledge that will strengthen and prepare registered nurses for their leadership roles. This knowledge can support the development of policies for organisational preconditions that ensure quality and safe care to older adults in municipal home care.

  • 5.
    Claesson, Maria
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Josefsson, Karin
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    What implies registered nurses’ leadershipclose to older adults in municipal homehealth care? A systematic review2020In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 30, p. 1-11, article id 1472-6955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Registered nurses are key figures in municipal home health care for older adults. Thus, registerednurses’ leadership is crucial to a successful and preventive care process as well as a supportive organization in orderto achieve safe care. However, there is limited research on what registered nurses’ leadership implies close to olderadults in municipal home health care. Thus, the aim is to compile and critically evaluate how international researchresults describe registered nurses’ leadership close to older adults in municipal home health care.

    Methods: A systematic literature review was performed in accordance with a qualitative research study. The mainsearch was conducted on 20 April 2018. The review was reported according to the PRISMA guidelines and is registeredin the PROSPERO database (ID# CRD42019109206). Nine articles from PubMed and CINAHL meet the quality criteria. Asynthesis of data was performed in four stages according to qualitative research synthesis.

    Results: Ten themes describe what registered nurses’ leadership close to older adults in municipal home health careentails: trust and control; continuous learning; competence through knowledge and ability; nursing responsibility on anorganizational level; application of skills; awareness of the individual’s needs and wholeness; mutual support; mutualrelationships; collaborating on organizational and interpersonal levels; and exposure to challenges.

    Conclusions: Registered nurses leading close to older adults in municipal home health care implies being multi-artists.Nursing education, including specialist education for registered nurses, should prepare individuals for their unique andcomplex leadership role as a multi-artist. Municipal employers require knowledge about what registered nurses’leadership implies in order to create adequate conditions for their leadership objectives to achieve safe care. Furtherresearch is warranted to explore registered nurses’ leadership close to older adults in municipal home health care fromdifferent perspectives, such as older adults and next of kin.

  • 6.
    Eide, Leslie S. P.
    et al.
    Department of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway.
    Giske, Tove
    Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuven, Britt Moene
    Department of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway.
    Johansson, Linda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Consequences of the Covid-19 virus on individuals receiving homecare services in Norway: A qualitative study of nursing students’ reflective notes2021In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflective notes in nursing education can facilitate students’ understanding of how individuals in need of home healthcare services experience unfamiliar situations, such as a pandemic. The aim of this study is to describe the consequences of the COVID-19 virus for individuals receiving homecare services through the eyes of nursing students.

  • 7.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Teaching and Learning Language, Literature and Media. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Allvin, Renée
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tensions in learning professional identities - nursing students' narratives and participation in practical skills during their clinical practice: An ethnographic study2017In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical practice is a pivotal part of nursing education. It provides students with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have acquired from lectures into practice with real patients, under the guidance of registered nurses. Clinical experience is also essential for shaping the nursing students' identity as future professional nurses. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the ways in which students learn practical skills and apply knowledge within and across different contexts, i.e. how they apply clinical skills, learnt in the laboratory in university settings, in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how nursing students describe, and use, their prior experiences related to practical skills during their clinical practice.

    Methods: An ethnographic case study design was used. Fieldwork included participant observations (82 h), informal conversations, and interviews (n = 7) that were conducted during nursing students' (n = 17) clinical practice at an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden.

    Results: The overarching theme identified was "Learning about professional identities with respect to situated power". This encompasses tensions in students' learning when they are socialized into practical skills in the nursing profession. This overarching theme consists of three sub-themes: "Embodied knowledge", "Divergent ways of assessing and evaluating knowledge" and "Balancing approaches".

    Conclusions: Nursing students do not automatically possess the ability to transfer knowledge from one setting to another; rather, their development is shaped by their experiences and interactions with others when they meet real patients. The study revealed different ways in which students navigated tensions related to power differentials. Reflecting on actions is a prerequisite for developing and learning practical skills and professional identities. This highlights the importance of both educators' and the preceptors' roles for socializing students in this process.

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  • 8.
    Golvani, Jenny
    et al.
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Surg Operat & Intens Care Unit, Box 1024, S-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Roos, Linda
    Hoglandssjukhuset, Surg Operat & Intens Care Unit, Vastanasgatan 9, S-57581 Eksjo, Sweden..
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Operating room nurses' experiences of limited access to daylight in the workplace - a qualitative interview study2021In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The operating room nurse is, among other things, responsible for patient safety and maintaining an aseptic environment. For hygienic reasons unnecessary traffic in the operating room should be avoided, which may mean that the operating room nurse works long shifts without relief. Operating departments are usually separated, where there might be no daylight opportunities in the operating room. The purpose of the study was to describe operating room nurses' experiences of limited access to daylight in the workplace. Method Qualitative design with four semi-structured focus groups of totally 15 operating room nurses. The analysis was performed with a content analysis with an inductive approach. Results The study generated two main categories, difference in light and contact with the outer world. Operating room nurses felt that daylight affected them differently from the light from lamps, where daylight was considered important for experiencing well-being. Daylight could lead to a sensation of joy but also increased awareness and energy which seemed to improve the ability to perform at work. The limited access to daylight contributed to fatigue and led to an internal stress that affected the nurses even after work. Having opportunities to look out through windows under a workday was important to experience contact with the outside world and created a sense of time. Conclusion To look out can reduce the feeling of being trapped in the closed context that the operating department entails. It can also lead to increased well-being and comfort in the workplace. We consider that daylight is an important component in the physical work environment that needs to be taken into consideration in further research as well as in new construction of operations departments.

  • 9.
    Johnsson, Anette
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Boman, Åse
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Manoeuvring between interplay and context- an ethnographic study of social interaction in encounters between registered nurses, older patients and their relatives2021In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social interactions between registered nurses, older patients and their relatives are essential and play a central role in developing a successful care relationship in healthcare encounters. How nurses interact with patients affects the patient's well-being. Limited time and demands for efficiency influence the encounter and complaints from patients and relatives often concern social interactions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the social interaction in encounters between registered nurses, older patients and their relatives at a department of medicine for older people.

    Methods: The study has an ethnographic approach including participatory observations (n = 21) and informal field conversations (n = 63), followed by a thematic analysis with an abductive approach reflecting Goffman's interactional perspective.

    Result: The result revealed a pattern where the participants manoeuvred between interplay and context. By manoeuvring, they defined roles but also created a common social situation. Nurses led the conversation; patients followed and described their health problems, while relatives captured the moment to receive and provide information. Finally, nurses summarised the encounter using ritual language, patients expressed gratitude through verbal and non-verbal expressions, while relatives verbally confirmed the agreements.

    Conclusion: The social interaction between registered nurses, older patients and relatives was shaped by a pattern where the participants manoeuvred between interplay and context. When all participants assume responsibility for the social interaction, they become active and listen to each other. The approach adopted by nurses is crucial, thus training in communication and social interaction skills are important. When the asymmetry due to imbalance, is reduced, less misunderstanding and a satisfactory care relationship can be achieved.

  • 10.
    Koltsida, Vicki
    et al.
    Home health nursing, Borås municipality, Borås, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Registered nurses’ experiences of information technology use in home health care - from a sustainable development perspective2021In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The work of registered nurses in home health care is complicated and extensive, and information technology (IT) is used in everyday activities. Coordination between care and resource efficiency is important. There is a wealth of information that supports the notion of sustainable development, but what sustainable development means from the perspective of the registered nurse in home health care when using IT is limited. The term “sustainable development” is not clearly defined and is poorly researched in nursing. Sustainable development in this study includes the ecological, economic, social, technical and ethical dimensions. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses’ experience of IT use in home health care through a sustainable development model. Methods: This study was conducted using ten semi-structured lifeworld interviews with registered nurses. The method employed was a qualitative content analysis with a deductive approach. The deductive approach consisted of a model of sustainable development. Results: Analysis of the interviews and the model of sustainable development provided categories: using IT from an ecological dimension, the registered nurses experienced reduced consumption and damage to the environment; using IT in the economical dimension, saving of time and resources was experienced; the use of IT affected social aspects such as the work environment and patient safety, and positive consequences, such as accessibility, were also mentioned; using IT from a technical dimension was characterized by the nurse’s attitude towards it – the registered nurses felt it improved the quality of care and gave users an overview of the organization; and from an ethical dimension, the registered nurses expressed the need for IT to be adaptable to the patient’s well-being and indicated that more awareness of risks in the care meeting may be needed. Conclusion: The findings are discussed based on the synergies and conflicts that arise between the different dimensions of sustainable development. IT intertwines and overlaps with, and within, the environment, economy, society, technology and ethics. Registered nurses in home health care want to conduct good and safe care, while using IT could benefit patients.

  • 11.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Wikby, Kerstin
    Linneus University, Växjö SE- 351 95, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, P.O. Box 187, Lund SE-221 00, Sweden.
    The complexity in the implementation process of empowerment-based chronic kidney care: a case study2014In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 22, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study is part of an interactive improvement intervention aimed to facilitate empowerment-based chronic kidney care using data from persons with CKD and their family members. There are many challenges to implementing empowerment-based care, and it is therefore necessary to study the implementation process. The aim of this study was to generate knowledge regarding the implementation process of an improvement intervention of empowerment for those who require chronic kidney care.

    Methods: A prospective single qualitative case study was chosen to follow the process of the implementation over a two year period. Twelve health care professionals were selected based on their various role(s) in the implementation of the improvement intervention. Data collection comprised of digitally recorded project group meetings, field notes of the meetings, and individual interviews before and after the improvement project. These multiple data were analyzed using qualitative latent content analysis.

    Results: Two facilitator themes emerged: Moving spirit and Encouragement. The healthcare professionals described a willingness to individualize care and to increase their professional development in the field of chronic kidney care. The implementation process was strongly reinforced by both the researchers working interactively with the staff, and the project group. One theme emerged as a barrier: the Limitations of the organization. Changes in the organization hindered the implementation of the intervention throughout the study period, and the lack of interplay in the organization most impeded the process.

    Conclusions: The findings indicated the complexity of maintaining a sustainable and lasting implementation over a period of two years. Implementing empowerment-based care was found to be facilitated by the cooperation between all involved healthcare professionals. Furthermore, long-term improvement interventions need strong encouragement from all levels of the organization to maintain engagement, even when it is initiated by the health care professionals themselves.

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  • 12.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Wikby, Kerstin
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Ahlstrom, Gerd
    Empowerment in outpatient care for patients with chronic kidney disease - from the family member's perspective2011In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 10, no 21, p. 2-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family members of persons with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease may experience feelings of vulnerability and insecurity as the disease follows its course. Against this background, the aim of the present study was to explore empowerment in outpatient care as experienced by these family members.

    Methods: An inductive approach for qualitative data analysis was chosen. The study sample comprised 12 family members of pre-dialysis patients at an outpatient kidney clinic. Two interviews with each family member were subjected to content analysis to gain an understanding of empowerment from the family members' perspective.

    Results: Having strength to assume the responsibility was the main theme that emerged from the following five sub-themes: Being an involved participant, Having confirming encounters, Trusting in health-care staff, Comprehending through knowledge, and Feeling left out. Four of these five sub-themes were positive. The fifth subtheme illuminated negative experience, indicating the absence of empowerment.

    Conclusions: Family members' experience of empowerment is dependent on their ability to assume the responsibility for a relative with chronic kidney disease when needed. The findings emphasise the need for a family perspective and the significance of a supportive environment for family members of persons in outpatient care.

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  • 13.
    Ringnér, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Graneheim, Ulla H.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Person-centred information to parents in paediatric oncology (the PIFBO study): A study protocol of an ongoing RCT2015In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parents of children with cancer experience a demanding situation and often suffer from psychological problems such as stress. Trying to coping with the complex body of information about their child's disease is one factor that contributes to this stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate an intervention for person-centred information to parents of children with cancer that consists of four sessions with children's nurses trained in the intervention method.

    Methods/Design: This is a multi-centre RCT with two parallel arms and a 1:1 allocation ratio. The primary outcome is illness-related parental stress. Secondary outcomes are post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, depression, satisfaction with information, expected and received knowledge, and experiences with health care providers. A process evaluation is performed to describe experiences and contextual factors. Data are collected using web questionnaires or paper forms according to the parents' preference, audio recording of the intervention sessions, and qualitative interviews with parents and the intervention nurses.

    Discussion: Few studies have evaluated information interventions for parents of children with cancer using large multi-centre RCTs. This intervention is designed to be performed by regular staff children's nurses, which will facilitate implementation if the intervention proves to be effective. Trial registration: Clinical trials NCT02332226 (December 11, 2014).

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  • 14.
    Sjölander, Catarina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The meaning and validation of social support networks for close family of persons with advanced cancer2012In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 11, no 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To strengthen the mental well-being of close family of persons newly diagnosed as having cancer, it is necessary to acquire a greater understanding of their experiences of social support networks, so as to better assess what resources are available to them from such networks and what professional measures are required. The main aim of the present study was to explore the meaning of these networks for close family of adult persons in the early stage of treatment for advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. An additional aim was to validate the study’s empirical findings by means of the Finfgeld-Connett conceptual model for social support. The intention was to investigate whether these findings were in accordance with previous research in nursing.

    Methods: Seventeen family members with a relative who 8–14 weeks earlier had been diagnosed as having lung or gastrointestinal cancer were interviewed. The data were subjected to qualitative latent content analysis and validated by means of identifying antecedents and critical attributes.

    Results: The meaning or main attribute of the social support network was expressed by the theme Confirmation through togetherness, based on six subthemes covering emotional and, to a lesser extent, instrumental support. Confirmation through togetherness derived principally from information, understanding, encouragement, involvement and spiritual community. Three subthemes were identified as the antecedents to social support: Need of support, Desire for a deeper relationship with relatives, Network to turn to. Social support involves reciprocal exchange of verbal and non-verbal information provided mainly by lay persons.

    Conclusions: The study provides knowledge of the antecedents and attributes of social support networks, particularly from the perspective of close family of adult persons with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. There is a need for measurement instruments that could encourage nurses and other health-care professionals to focus on family members’ personal networks as a way to strengthen their mental health. There is also a need for further clarification of the meaning of social support versus caring during the whole illness trajectory of cancer from the family members’ perspective.

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  • 15.
    Sjölander, Catarina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences.
    Striving to be prepared for the painful: Management strategies following a family member’s diagnosis of advanced cancer2011In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 10, no 18, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer has consequences not only for the sick person but also for those who have a close relationship with that person. Greater knowledge about how family members manage the situation in the period immediately following the diagnosis means greater opportunity to provide the best possible support for the family. The purpose of this study was to explore management strategies that family members use when the patient is in the early stage of treatment for advanced cancer.

    Methods: Twenty family members of cancer patients were included in the study shortly after the diagnosis. The patients had been diagnosed 8-14 weeks earlier with advanced lung cancer or gastrointestinal cancer. The data were collected in interviews with family members and subjected to qualitative latent content analysis. Through the identification of similarities and dissimilarities in the units of meaning, abstraction into codes and sub-themes became possible. The sub-themes were then brought together in one overarching theme.

    Results: The overall function of management strategies is expressed in the theme Striving to be prepared for the painful. The family members prepare themselves mentally for the anticipated tragedy. Family relationships become increasingly important, and family members want to spend all their time together. They try to banish thoughts of the impending death and want to live as normal a life as possible. It becomes important to family members to live in the present and save their energy for the time when they will need it the most. How participants handle their worries, anxiety and sadness can be categorized into seven sub-themes or management strategies: Making things easier in everyday life, Banishing thoughts about the approaching loss, Living in the present, Adjusting to the sick person’s situation, Distracting oneself by being with others, Shielding the family from grief, and Attempting to maintain hope.

    Conclusions: The findings revealed that the family members have their own resources for handling the early stage of the cancer trajectory in an acceptable way. There is a need for longitudinal studies to generate knowledge for designing evidence-based intervention programmes that can prevent future ill-health in these vulnerable family members.

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  • 16.
    Sterner, Anders
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Sciences, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Säfström, Emma
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Palmér, Lina
    Faculty of Caring Sciences, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hagiwara, Magnus Andersson
    Centre for Prehospital Research, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Development and initial validation of an instrument to measure novice nurses' perceived ability to provide care in acute situations - PCAS2020In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Novice nurses need to be better prepared to provide care in acute situations. There is currently no validated scale specifically measuring nurses' perception of their ability to provide care in acute situations. The aim of this study was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of a scale that measures novice nurses self-reported perception of ability to provide care in acute situations.

    Method: Development and test of the psychometric properties of the Perception to Care in Acute Situations (PCAS) scale. Items were generated from interviews with novice nurses (n = 17) and validated using opinions of an expert panel and cognitive interviews with the target group.Two hundred nine novice nurses tested the final scale. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to test construct validity, item reduction and underlying dimensions between the measured variables and the latent construct.

    Result: The PCAS scale contains 17 items grouped into three factors. EFA demonstrated a clean three factor logic construct solution with no cross-loadings, high correlation for the total scale in both Cronbach's alfa 0.90 and ordinal alpha 0.92.

    Conclusions: The PCAS scale has proven to have acceptable validity. The factors," confidence in provision of care", "communication" and "patient perspective" are likely to be important aspects of providing care in acute situations. Additional testing of the PCAS is needed to conclude if it is sensitive enough to evaluate interventions aimed at improving novice nurses competence and suitable as a guide for reflection for novice nurses.

  • 17.
    Thapa, Dip Raj
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Stengård, Johanna
    Stress Research Institute, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Sandnes, Norway.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Anna
    Stress Research Institute, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Job demands, job resources, and health outcomes among nursing professionals in private and public healthcare sectors in Sweden: A prospective study2022In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Nursing professionals exhibit high prevalence of stress-related health problems. Job demands and job resources are parallel drivers of health and well-being among employees. Better job resources associate with better job satisfaction, job motivation and engagement even when job demands are high. To date, there is limited research which explores the association between job demands, job resources and health outcomes among nursing professionals in the Swedish context. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate Swedish nursing professionals’ job demands and job resources in relation to health outcomes, with comparisons between the private and public healthcare sectors. The specific research questions were as follows: (1) Are there differences between private and public healthcare regarding job demands, job resources, and health outcomes? and (2) Are there prospective associations between job demands and job resources in relation to health outcomes?

    Methods

    Data were drawn from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) 2016 and 2018, including 520 nurses and 544 assistant nurses working in the private and public healthcare sectors from 2016 (baseline). Data were analyzed using binary logistic regression.

    Results

    Nursing professionals reported higher threats, lower bullying, lower control, lower social support, and lower cohesion in the public healthcare units compared to the private healthcare units. The prospective analyses showed that job resources in terms of social support and rewards were associated with higher self-rated health and lower burnout. Cohesion was associated with higher self-rated health. Job demands in terms of psychological demands and job efforts were associated with lower self-rated health, higher burnout, and higher sickness absence, while emotional demands were associated with higher burnout.

    Conclusions

    Nursing professionals’ job resources are deficient in public healthcare units. Job resources are associated with positive health outcomes, whereas job demands are associated with negative health outcomes, among nursing professionals. Strengthening job resources among nursing professionals in the private and public healthcare sectors can promote and sustain their work-related health.

  • 18.
    Thapa, Dip Raj
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, PO Box 408, Skövde, 541 28, Sweden.
    Subedi, Madhusudan
    School of Public Health, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, GPO Box 26500, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, PO Box 408, Skövde, 541 28, Sweden.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, PO Box 4, Oslo, 0130, Norway.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, PO Box 408, Skövde, 541 28, Sweden.
    Facilitators for and barriers to nurses’ work-related health: a qualitative study2022In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Work-related health problems, such as work stress, fatigue, and burnout constitute a global challenge within the nursing profession. Work-related health among nurses is not yet a prioritized phenomenon in Nepal. Health-promoting approaches to maintaining and sustaining nurses’ health are therefore essential. The aim of this study was to explore and thereby gain a deeper understanding of how nurses in Nepal’s hospitals experience their everyday work, with a focus on promoting and sustaining their work-related health.

    Methods: A qualitative design with semi-structured individual interviews were used. Nineteen registered nurses working at hospitals in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, were individually interviewed between October 6 and December 5, 2018. Transcribed interviews were analyzed through thematic analysis.

    Results: Four main themes with belonging eight subthemes were constructed from the analysis: (1) “Sense of meaningfulness and belongingness in work culture” with subthemes; “Open environment” and “Sharing attitude and cooperating for the entire team” (2) “Support and rewards from the management team” with subthemes; “Lacking managerial support” and “Fair evaluation and job promotion opportunities”(3) “Workload and protection against work-related hazards” with subthemes; “Stressful and multitasking in workload” and “Lacking equipment for own health and caring”, and (4) “Motivation through opportunities and activities” with subthemes; “Employment benefits that motivate work”, and “Activities outside of work needed to recover”. These main themes and subthemes described nurses’ facilitators for and barriers to their work environment and health.

    Conclusion: Our study highlighted nurses’ experiences with facilitators and barriers to their work-related health. Nurses’ work-related health was positively affected by support from colleagues, managers, and the organization. Conversely, less support from managers, lack of equipment, and unfair judgment were barriers to nurses’ work-related health. This study adds new knowledge about nurses’ work-related health from the context of Nepal. Hospital organizations and nursing managers in similar cultural and healthcare settings can apply the results of our study to develop strategies to promote and sustain nurses’ health and prevent work-related illness.

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