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  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Rheumatology and Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Self-efficacy and pain acceptance as mediators of the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2017In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 824-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether personal factors (self-efficacy and pain acceptance) mediate the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: Persons with rheumatoid arthritis for at least four years (n = 737; 73% women) answered a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy, pain acceptance, performance of valued life activities, and self-rated pain. Relationships among these constructs were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Structural equation modelling was then used to examine the mediational role of personal factors on the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities.

    RESULTS: A direct negative association between pain and performance of valued life activities was identified (Beta = .34, P < .001). This suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who had higher levels of pain has increased difficulties in performing valued life activities. Self-efficacy and activity engagement component of pain acceptance mediated the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities, however the pain willingness component of pain acceptance did not influence participation in valued life activities.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of considering personal factors, such as pain acceptance and self-efficacy, in facilitating participation in valued life activities.

  • 2.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Wenneberg, Stig
    Gunnarsson, Lars-Gunnar
    A comprehensive rehabilitation programme tailored to the needs of adults with muscular dystrophy.2006In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 132-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess if activities of daily living (ADL), coping and quality of life could be improved in adults with muscular dystrophy through a comprehensive rehabilitation programme. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental, controlled clinical study comparing patients with similar age and disease aspects. SETTING: Two different counties in Sweden, being either study or control setting. SUBJECTS: The study group comprised 37 adults (21 women, 16 men; mean age 50 years), while the control group comprised 39 people (25 women, 14 men; mean age 46 years). INTERVENTIONS: Four rehabilitation sessions tailored to different medical, physical and psychosocial needs of the patients, comprising a total of 10 days over a period of 18 months. MAIN MEASURES: ADL, the Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale measuring coping strategies, the Sickness Impact Profile measuring health-related quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Psychosocial Well-being Questionnaire. RESULTS: No significant differences were found between groups with regard to the outcome measures. There was increased dependence on others in ADL after 18 months in both groups, but it was more pronounced in the control group. Furthermore, a clear trend was observed in the data with regard to coping patterns, the control group using more coping strategies such as 'Helplessness/hopelessness' (P= 0.057), 'Anxious preoccupation' (P = 0.085) and 'Fatalistic' (P= 0.073) when being compared to the study group. CONCLUSIONS: No apparent effects on ADL were found from the rehabilitation programme, although there was a tendency of reduction of maladaptive coping patterns in the study group. This initial study may provide the rationale and basis for a randomized controlled trial.

  • 3. Baigi, A
    et al.
    Hildingh, C
    Virdhall, H
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Sense of coherence as well as social support and network as perceived by patients with a suspected or manifest myocardial infarction: a short-term follow-up study2008In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 646-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare sense of coherence as well as social support and network as perceived by ischaemic heart disease patients at baseline and two weeks post-discharge in terms of age, sex, educational and marital status. DESIGN: Multicentre study with a prospective short-term follow-up design. SETTING: A university hospital, a central hospital and a district hospital in southern Sweden. SUBJECTS: Consecutive sample of 246 patients with a suspect or manifest myocardial infarction. MAIN MEASURES: The Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-R), the Medical Outcome Study (MOS) Social Support Survey and the Sense of Coherence Scale were included in a self-administered questionnaire and answered twice, together with sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: Bivariate analyses indicated changes in social support (practical support increased in men and decreased in women; both P= 0.003) and social network (family network increased among >65 year olds; P= 0.001, men; P= 0.013, and women; P= 0.033, those with a low; P=0.017, and intermediate; P= 0.033, educational level, as well as those cohabiting; P= 0.0001), but did not reveal any difference in sense of coherence. CONCLUSIONS: Sociodemographic variables have no influence on sense of coherence but do affect social support (i.e. practical support and social network, family). Ischaemic heart disease patients' short stay in hospital implies that the network outside the hospital has to assume responsibility, but at the same time it is important for health care professionals to have sufficient knowledge to be able to support the specific needs of patients and their family members.

  • 4. Boström, Katrin
    et al.
    Sjöquist Nätterlund, Birgitta
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Sickness impact in people with muscular dystrophy: a longitudinal study over 10 years.2005In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 686-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe changes of function in terms of sickness impact over 10 years in adult patients with different types of muscular dystrophy. DESIGN: Patients with muscular dystrophy answered the Sickness Impact Profile and Self-report ADL questionnaires in 1991 and 2001. SETTING: The study population was identified in a comprehensive prevalence study in the county of Orebro, Sweden. SUBJECTS: The study group comprised 44 people grouped according to whether they had myotonic dystrophy or muscular dystrophy with proximal or distal muscles affected. MAIN MEASURES: Comparison was made between assessments of sickness impact in terms of function at the two time points. RESULTS: Most obvious deterioration over time was in activities of daily living that require finger and arm strength. Ambulation was significantly decreased in myotonic dystrophy and proximal muscular dystrophy. Those walking without assistive devices decreased from 91% to 52%, and the number with a disability pension increased from 36 to 55%. There was a relatively small influence with regard to psychosocial dysfunction assessed by the Sickness Impact Profile. CONCLUSIONS: This longitudinal study shows the deteriorating functions reported by patients with muscular dystrophy. This knowledge could be used to formulate new interventions in order to offer appropriate support and treatment to this patient group.

  • 5.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Hansson, H
    Ysander, L
    Working conditions among men before and after their first myocardial infarction: implications for a rehabilitative care strategy1992In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 299-304Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Futurum – the Academy for Healthcare, County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Test–retest reliability of the Swedish version of the life-space assessment questionnaire among community-dwelling older adults2014In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 817-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the test–retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire.

    Design: Test–retest reliability study.

    Subjects: A total of 298 community-dwelling subjects between 75 and 90 years of age.

    Methods: The Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire was translated into Swedish. By personal interviews during home visits and two weeks later by telephone interviews the subjects were asked about their life-space mobility during the past four weeks, and how often and whether they were independent or needed assistance from another person or equipment to reach different life-space levels.

    Results: None of the four scoring methods showed significant difference between test sessions. The mean (SD) total scores were 65 (22) and 65 (23) out of the maximum possible score of 120 at the two sessions. High levels were found for independent, assisted, and maximal life-space at both sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficients and weighted Kappa-values between 0.84–0.94 were found for the total score, the independent, and the assisted life-space levels, indicating good to excellent reliability. A lower Kappa-value was observed for the maximal life-space level, mainly owing to skewed distributions. The method error values showed that a change of 10 in the total score and a change of one level in any of the three life-space levels can be considered to indicate a real change in clinical practice.

    Conclusion: The Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire can be reliably used among community-dwelling older adults.

  • 7. Larsson, PA
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Aspects of life stress after myocardial infarction: implications for a multifactorial rehabilitation1991In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Timmer, Amanda J.
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Unsworth, Carolyn A.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Taylor, Nicholas F.
    School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Rehabilitation interventions with deconditioned older adults following an acute hospital admission: a systematic review2014In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1078-1086Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine effectiveness of inpatient rehabilitation interventions with older deconditioned adults following an acute hospital admission. Data sources: Systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 14 electronic databases from their inception to February 2014. Review methods: Studies selected concerned inpatient rehabilitation, single or multi-factorial interventions, conducted by any discipline, where participants were aged 55 years or older and 50% or more could be classed as deconditioned. Studies were excluded if they focused on acute onset of disability conditions. Data were extracted using the McMaster Quantitative Review Form and appraised using the PEDro Rating Scale. Results: No RCTs were found that specifically addressed the aim. Four studies were reviewed describing multi-disciplinary rehabilitation programs that aimed to reduce functional decline in older adults, with inconsistent findings. However, in two studies participants showed a positive improvement in completing basic activities of daily living (ADL) following multi-disciplinary rehabilitation, one at discharge (median change score Intervention (I)0.23:Control (C)0.15,P=<0.001) and one at 12-months post discharge (I-48.4%: C-25.4% (P 0.001) Relative Risk (RR)1.90 95%CI: 1.15-3.16 (reviewer calculated)). Discharge to home was also measured in two studies with participants in the intervention groups having a higher probability of going home (I-55.6%: C-36.7 %, RR 1.52 95%CI: 1.02-2.26 (reviewer calculated) and I-60%: C-20%, RR 3.00 95%CI: 1.16-7.73(reviewer calculated)). Conclusion: No RCTs have been conducted to examine the effectiveness of specific recondition-ing interventions in rehabilitation, and there is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of geriatric rehabilitation programs to reduce functional decline in older adults who are deconditioned.

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