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  • 1.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    FoU-Södertörn, R&D, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Denhov, Anne
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aloneness and loneliness – persons with severe mental illness and experiences of being alone2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) are often described as lonely and socially incapable – an inability resulting from the mental illness. The aim of this article is to explore experiences of being alone among persons with SMI. The article is based on interviews with 19 persons diagnosed with psychosis who were interviewed between four and nine times over a period of three years. The findings show that experiences of being alone can be identified by two concepts: aloneness and loneliness. The persons in the study appeared as socially able and active in relation to their social lives. However, a social agent does not operate in a void but in interaction with specific living conditions; the experiences of aloneness and loneliness may be viewed as the result of the interplay between the individual and the social and material environment.

  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Building a community: Disability and identity in the Qur’an2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 210-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article elaborates on disability and the Qur’an and accentuates how a grand narrative of moral codes held the community together and enforced a collective identity of the ummah, in which disability was interlaced with the shaping of an in-group grounded in a common set of values. This process of identity making in turn had implications for people with disabilities, since they could have trouble fulfilling religious requirements, something that was met with counter mechanisms of solidarity within the community of Muslim believers.

  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    On the borderline – representations of disability in the Old Testament2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 280-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores disability in the Old Testament. The discussion takes its starting point in a number of domains and arenas where disability was visualized and investigates the significance and meaning that can be attached to these domains in relation to the problem of inclusion and exclusion. The analysis highlights complex and contradictory phenomena, where the interpretation was not given but rather dependent on the cultural context and different

  • 4.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Out of the frame: disability and the body in the writings of Karl Marx2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How disability as a phenomenon is to be understood has been widely discussed within the field of disability research. Influenced by a Marxist perspective, the social model has reinforced the view that disability results from the organization of society rather than from individual premises. This article elaborates on these issues by exploring the writings of Karl Marx and his views concerning disability. The analysis pinpoints bodily normality in Marx’s reasoning and how the economic system shapes the premises for participation and roles, but also how people with disabilities were left out of the progressive call for social change. 

  • 5.
    Cameron, David Lansing
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Persson, Bengt
    Department of Education and Behavioural Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    School district administrators' perspectives on special education policy and practice in Norway and Sweden2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 212-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine special education policy and practice from the perspective of school district administrators in Norway and Sweden. Administrators from 266 Norwegian and 262 Swedish municipalities completed a survey concerning: (a) reasons children need special education, (b) common and desired organizational solutions, and (c) the influence of policy on practice. Despite a number of clear differences, findings suggest that Swedish and Norwegian administrators share similar attitudes regarding the provision of special education support. It appears that in both countries inclusive practices are seen as the ideal, yet, Norwegian administrators appear to have a stronger preference for categorical or segregated solutions. However, this finding must be viewed in light of current practices in each country. In particular, we take into consideration data indicating that 17% of Swedish students receive special educational support, as compared to approximately 6% in Norway.

  • 6. Eriksson, L
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation in school activities: a comparison between students with and without disabilities2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, p. 206-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Granlund, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Perceived Participation: A comparison of students with disabilities and students without disabilities2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 206-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to a recent study (Almqvist & Granlund, accepted), participation is not strongly related to type and degree of disability but probably to the context of the individual as well as generic personal factors. Such diverse factors can over time become orchestrated and pull the development of individuals with disability in a certain direction. This study compares how 959 students with and without disabilities in two age‐groups 7–12 and 13–17 perceive their participation in school activities. The main method of analysis is one‐way‐ANOVA. The result indicates that students without disabilities rated their perceived participation higher, especially in unstructured “free”; activities. Further, students without disabilities experience a higher degree of autonomy and rate the availability of school activities as higher. Students with disabilities rate their interaction with teachers as better and more frequent, but their interaction with peers as less frequent. These differences increase with age and may reinforce a stigmatization process.

  • 8.
    Hedegaard, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Hugo, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Social dimensions of learning – the experience of young adult students with Asperger syndrome at a supported IT education2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how young adults with Asperger syndrome experience an educational project called ‘the IT-track’. The methods used included participant observation and research interviews. The results were interpreted within the theoretical framework described by ‘Supported Education’ (SED). The most prominent experience among the students was social learning. Students describe that they gradually began to function better socially with others and developed various abilities, such as asking for help, and talking to groups.The teachers emerged in the interviews as the single most important source of support as they formed the basis of two key points of SED. Overall, studying at the IT-track resulted in the students extending their horizons of possibility by breaking away from their previous sense of isolation which was marked by idleness and loneliness. By participating at the IT-track, the students’ sense of participation and meaningfulness increased.

  • 9.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Olsson, Lena M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Kristianstad University.
    Perceived needs among parents of children with a mild intellectual disability in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 307-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents of children with a mild intellectual disability experience more distress and require more support than other parents. The aim was to investigate the perceived family needs of parents of children with an MID and to investigate the relationship between parents’ perceived self-efficacy in their parental role and in collaborating with professionals as well as with their perceived needs for support. Interviews were based on questionnaires to the parents of 38 children. The results revealed that parents perceived need for information, respite, and venues in which to meet other parents in similar situations. The informational needs were related to parental self-efficacy and obtaining support. A lower need for information was related to higher perceived control over services. In conclusion, it appears that professionals need to work to strengthen parents’ ability to ask for support and to express the needs. Well-informed parents will develop stronger parental self-efficacy and perceived control over services.

  • 10.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Play in retrospection: play experiences from childhood in adults with visual disability, motor disability and Asperger syndrome2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 111-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze and describe how adults with visual disability, motor disability and Asperger syndrome retrospectively identify and experience play in their childhood. Fifteen adults, aged 25 to 76 years, were interviewed about their play experiences. A qualitative approach was adopted with the aim to describe qualitatively different experiences of play. The findings indicate that play experiences merge like mirror images with participation and exclusion as two divergent sides of play. The data suggest that niches for play experiences include three components related to participation and exclusion: a personal component, a social component and an environmental component. Type of disability is one of many aspects making up the three components without being a central feature within any of the components. Type of disability affects personal characteristics and preferences, form of social interaction and the environmental requirements for participating in play but not the experience of play per se. Unique to this study is the importance assigned to the concept of niche. Perceived niches are based on memories and also influence the construction of memories. Thus, they function as a link between perceptions of experiences of play from childhood to adulthood.

  • 11.
    Simmeborn Fleischer, Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Alienation and Struggle Everyday student-life of three male students with Asperger Syndrome2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 177-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how three students with Asperger Syndrome (AS) involved inhigher education, in Sweden, perceive their everyday life as a student. The aim ofthe study was to describe the kind of support offered within a freedom of choicesystem to determine whether the support given by the university acts as afacilitator or as a barrier. The approach is a case study methodology. Nineinterviews, three for each student, are analysed as narratives, based on units ofmeaning and categories. Two main themes emerged from the analysis: (1) Thefeeling of Alienation is characterized by the students’ perceptions of beingoutsiders and having to deal with everyday student-life issues instead of engagingin their studies; (2) Struggle the paradox of handling the feelings of belonging toa community and gaining confidence in being ‘odd’, but acknowledged.Conclusion: freedom of choice demanding logical reasoning can become aburden for students with AS and support given by the universities is sometimesperceived more as a barrier than as a facilitator.

  • 12.
    Staffan, Bengtsson
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    The two-sided coin – disability, normalcy and social categorization in the New Testament2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 269-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the issue of disability, normalcy and social categorization in relation to the New Testament. It discusses how disabilities ended up in elusive and contradictory categories where a number of various mechanisms and roles coincided and where different systems of logic converged. The scrutiny suggests that people with disabilities simultaneously were considered to be both a threat and an opportunity. The analysis illustrates how the interpretation of disability is a malleable phenomenon continually affected by changes within the cultural context.

  • 13.
    Ylvén, Regina
    et al.
    School of Welfare and Health, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Collaborative problem solving in the context of early childhood intervention – the link between problems and goals2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 221-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish Child and Youth Habilitation Services (C-YHS) for children with disabilities and their families' build on regular planning meetings involving families and professionals, and appointments and interventions implemented between meetings. This study explores the content of issues discussed at planning meetings, and the relation between content and activities implemented in everyday interventions. Longitudinal data from five families and their C-YHS-teams were used. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. The results illustrate a process with a high degree of correspondence between families' concerns, experienced problems, the formal decisions and the activities they generated. Concerns were focused on the future, and related actions focused on supporting adults in the environment, mostly the parents, thus indirectly relating to the child. Problems were focused on the current situation, and to a larger extent concerned actions directly related to the child. Although a family-centred service, interventions focused on the proximal environment, may be underreported.

1 - 13 of 13
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