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  • 1.
    Borell, Klas
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Espvall, Majen
    Pryde, Joanna
    Brenner, Sten-Olof
    The Repertory Grid Technique in Social Work Research, Practice and Education2003In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 477-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a brief introduction to the Repertory Grid Technique and aims to demonstrate the use of the technique in different social work contexts. The Repertory Grid Technique draws from an open interview procedure that requires respondents to classify and evaluate elements within the environment on a numerical scale according to their own personal constructs. The result of this interview is a cognitive matrix of elements and constructs that can be explored in both a qualitative and a quantitative manner. Several applications for the practice, education and research of social work are suggested, with the overall purpose to heighten the perception of individuals' mental construction of their social life.

  • 2.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    From shadow to person: Exploring roles in participant observations in an eldercare context2014In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 406-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores participant observation as a research method and more specifically addresses the intriguing situation of the researcher's role in interacting with participants in the setting. The materials used in the analysis are field notes from participant observations focused on staff at two eldercare units in a mid-sized city in Sweden. Because limitations when referring to Raymond Gold's roles of participant observations are known but sparsely described and discussed, this text attempts to provide that description and discussion. The specific question posed in the article is, (How) do roles for the researcher in participant observations change during the course of fieldwork? Randall Collins' theory on interaction ritual chains is used as an analytical tool to identify symbols in the two staff groups. The examples chosen from the field are symbols displayed at the units, which moreover illustrate that the researcher’s roles in participant observations not only change once or twice during the course of fieldwork but also change continuously. Consequently, fieldworkers shift roles in different situations when observing a variety of people and settings. Observations are developed in the interaction between the researcher and the participants; therefore, referring observations to a number of roles is restrictive and limiting.

  • 3.
    Ekström, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Wilińska, Monika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    'I don’t think you will understand me because really, I believe' – Unaccompanied female minors re-negotiating religion2019In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of religion in migration has been a contested subject in previous research and social work practice, with religion being considered both a bridge and a barrier to integration. When considering unaccompanied female minors, struggling to be recognised beyond the prevailing image of the victimised refugee girl, religion is sometimes seen as a force of oppression rather than a tool for integration. In this article, we focus on the embodied practices of young women?s lived religion in a context where such practices are constructed as otherness. Based on an interview study with 11 unaccompanied female minors, this article explores the identity negotiations that emerged when migrating from societies where religion plays an integral part in everyday life to a society with highly secular values. By using the concept of (oppositional) gaze, we explore how these young women negotiate their identities at a point where the normative, invisible gaze meets the embodied practices of lived religion. We demonstrate how these young women are themselves agents of their own faith, and we confirm previous research that points to religion as a support structure for unaccompanied minors; however, not without causing friction in their new society. The study shows how lived practices of religion and the development of an oppositional gaze can function as mutually reinforcing processes in identity negotiation. In social work, understanding the role of religion through lived practices might contribute to a more holistic approach when creating solutions for young people experiencing turbulent circumstances of arriving in a new country.

  • 4.
    Skillmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbete (SA).
    Agevall Gross, Lotta
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbete (SA).
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbete (SA).
    Denvall, Verner
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbete (SA).
    The pursuit of standardization in domestic violence social work: A multiple case study of how the idea of using risk assessment tools is manifested and processed in the Swedish social services2017In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This multiple case study examines how the idea of using risk assessment tools is manifested and processed in Swedish social services. Based on the analysis of interviews with different stakeholders and of organizational documents in two social service organizations, we investigate the actors who control local risk assessment practices. The findings illustrate that a relatively small group of social workers in the organizations have been able to forward their claims and decide how risk assessment work should be carried out without much intrusion from local managers or politicians. The findings also validate other studies that found that increased standardization can strengthen social workers’ ability to perform their professional task rather than lead to de-professionalization. This article ends with a discussion of what risk assessment practices might mean for domestic violence victims.

  • 5.
    Wilinska, Monika
    School of Applied Social Science, University of Stirling, UK.
    Shame on me ... emotions in the fieldwork on old age in Japan2014In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 602-618Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Wilinska, Monika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Living Conditions and Care of Older People. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Henning, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Living Conditions and Care of Older People.
    Old age identity in social welfare practice2011In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 346-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this study was to examine the process of old age identity construction within a setting of social welfare work with old people. We sought to identify social welfare practices that construct and enforce certain old age identities. The empirical material analysed in this article is part of a study of a non-governmental organization in Poland. The method of analysis was inspired by nexus analysis, which analyses social actions through a historical and ethnographic perspective. The analysis focused on practices that produced, sustained and promoted particular old age identity. The results of this study show a complex process in which welfare professionals create the identities of preferred clients. The study shows that social welfare practice is often oriented toward imagined client identities that have little to do with real people.

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