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  • 1.
    Atterström, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication. Department of Pedagogy and Learning, Linnéuniversitetet Humaniora och Samhällsvetenskap, Växjö, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Elsie
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Department of Education and Special/Inclusive education, Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Experiences about Reading and Writing Development Narrated by Students with Severe Speech and Physical Impairment2023In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 1101-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research shows an arrest in reading and writing development among 9–12-year-old students with severe speech and physical impairment, SSPI. This article explores what five students with SSPI who have reached beyond beginner’s phase without arrest in their literacy development have experienced as significant for their reading and writing development. The research design was explorative and case based. It contained researcher–participant longitudinal dialogues focusing on the students’ experiences of literacy learning. Computer assisted email interviews were used. A semi-structured interview manual guided each dialogue. With the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems and assistive technology devices, the participants could read and write (with alphabetical print in Swedish) independently. The analysis revealed four themes of great importance for the students’ development of alphabetical print literacy skills: assistive technology use in writing and reading, continuity in long-term pedagogical relationships, mutual persistence in communication, and visions of nearer goals and future work life. The results are discussed in relation to the theoretical frameworks of self-efficacy and the capability approach.

  • 2.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Anderson, Katie
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Joosten, Annette
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Parents’ perspectives on inclusive schools for children with Autism Spectrum Conditions2015In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 1-23Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) increasingly participate in inclusive education. The present study reviewed studies of children with ASC for parents’ perceptions of aspects they believed contributed to inclusive mainstream school settings. Understanding the parental perspective on the facilitators for inclusion of their child with ASC in mainstream schools is likely to improve inclusive practice. Twenty-eight empirical articles revealed that parents perceived teachers as playing a vital role in the inclusion of their children with ASC. The school was considered important in creating an environment that enabled inclusion, particularly through positive peer relations, prevention of bullying and help from support staff. At the societal level, funding and legislative policies were considered important. By understanding these aspects, policy-makers, teachers, school administrators and therapists may better be able to address parents’ inclusion concerns and thereby develop strategies to improve inclusion in mainstream schools.

  • 3.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD , Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD , Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    "Special support" in preschools in Sweden: Preschool staff's definition of the construct2010In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the definitions of the construct “young children in need of special support” given by preschool staff in Sweden in 540 preschool units. The study has a mixed‐methods design based on qualitative analysis of an open‐ended question and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. The results reveal two general perspectives in definitions of the construct, a child perspective and an organisational perspective. Units with a child perspective had a higher proportion of children in need of special support, especially girls. The study highlights that the term “children in need of special support” is partially socially constructed and is partially based on perceived child characteristics. The perceptions of what is considered to be a child in need of special support held by staff in a unit may impact on the services provided to children in need of special support.

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