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  • 1.
    Boström, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    How older people perceive and experience sense of security when moving into and living in a nursing home: [Hur äldre personer uppfattar och erfar trygghet i flytt till och boende i särskilt boende för äldre. En fallstudie]2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 697-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sense of security is important throughout the lifespan not at least in advanced age with increased risks of functional declines and decreased social capital. Despite this, knowledge concerning older person’s perceptions and experiences of sense of security when moving into nursing homes is scarce. This study is a longitudinal, descriptive, exploratory case study with in-depth interviews and observations of three older persons in the age of 87, 88, and 91 years in a mid-sized municipality in the south of Sweden, in order to highlight how sense of security is experienced when moving into and living in a nursing home. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis, which resulted in one main theme and four categories. The main theme, ‘Adaptation and sense of security’, indicates older persons’ need to adapt to the new context of the nursing home, and how this relates to their sense of security. The categories – ‘Control’, ‘Struggling for understanding’, ‘Lack of influence’, and ‘Grasping’ – suggest that older persons’ sense of security is reduced when they must adjust to routines without sufficient management and understanding. When able to maintain control over daily routines, and felt as a part of the new context, they perceived a sense of security.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Pringle, Keith
    His helping hands-adult daughter's perceptions' of fathers with caregiving responsibility2013In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 235-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women's position as informal carers has been taken for granted in social policy and social professions, while relatively few discussions have elaborated on caring as a later life activity for men and the impact on family care. This study explores the processes connected to informal caregiving in later life through the position of adult daughters of older fathers engaged with long-term caregiving responsibilities for a partner. A sample of eight daughters, with fathers having primary caregiving responsibility for their ill partners was recruited and in-depth interviews were carried out and analysed according to qualitative procedures. The daughters' descriptions of their relationships with their fathers show that being an older man who engages in caring can have a positive outcome on relations. Even if some of the daughters have doubts about their fathers “masculine authenticity”, all of them appear to cherish “his helping hands” as a carer and closer more intimate relationships with their fathers. Caring for an old and frail spouse may potentially present alternative ways of being a man beyond traditional ‘male activities’ and that caring might also sometimes involve a re-construction of gender identities. It is suggested that social work professionals may use a gendered understanding to assess and work strategically with daughters and other family members who support caring fathers.

  • 3.
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Enheten för forskning om det civila samhället.
    Informal care and support for carers in Sweden: patterns of service receipt among informal caregivers and care recipients2004In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes and analyses the kinds of support received by different categories of informal carers, and the kinds of help that care recipients receive in addition to that provided by various categories of carers. Data were collected in a Swedish county in 2000, by means of telephone interviews. The net sample consisted of 2,697 individuals 18-84 years old, and the response rate was 61%. The results showed that relatively few carers in any care category received any kind of support aimed directly at them as carers. The most widespread form of support received by providers of personal care was relief services. Those most likely to be receiving care from the public care system were people also receiving personal care from an informal caregiver. Nevertheless, the majority of those receiving personal care from an informal carer did not receive any help from the public care system or from voluntary organizations or for-profit agencies. These results indicate that social policy and social work need to clarify the aims of the services they provide. They also need to take the needs of both caregivers and recipients into account when discussing support systems.

  • 4.
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Department of Civil Society Research, Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Jeppsson Grassman, Eva
    National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life (NISAL), Linköping University, Sweden.
    Links between informal caregiving and volunteering in Sweden: a 17-year perspective2013In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 205-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses informal caregiving and volunteering in organizations over 17 years in Sweden, with a focus on links between these two forms of unpaid activities. The discussion is based on results from a national survey that was repeated four times in the period 1992–2009. Links were found between the different types of activities. In all four studies a substantial group of the population was involved both in informal caregiving and volunteering. This group of ‘active citizens’ are commonly also engaged in informal social networks. This ‘double active’ group had increased over time and they provide a substantial amount of hours of involvement. Patterns outlined in this article demonstrate that unpaid activities represent a multifaceted phenomenon, and that the boundaries between informal caregiving and volunteering as forms of engagement may be more fluid than has previously been acknowledged. The results challenge the literature in which informal caregiving is viewed as a major obstacle to volunteering. At the same time, however, informal caregiving in general was found to be increasing. There might be reasons to be cautious about the possible risk that too much pressure on citizens for informal caregiving might jeopardize the type of double involvement that is outlined in this article.

  • 5.
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Stereotypes about caregiving and lessons from the Swedish panorama of care [Stereotyper kring omsorgsgivare och det svenska omsorgspanoramat]2015In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 185-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the panorama of care provision in Sweden from the informal carers' perspective. We consider informal care, publicly financed services, for-profit agencies and voluntary organizations, using a survey conducted in 2009. Most cared-for persons with minor needs living in a separate household are helped also by others, but only a tenth use public services or other providers. About half of cared-for persons with major needs living in a separate household receive care also from other informal carers as well as public services. Only 1 in 10 of them relied on no one else beyond the carer interviewed. Among intra household carers—a minority of all persons cared for—it was common that the carer was alone in his/her commitment, without any contributions from public services or others. For the large majority of informal carers it is not a solitary undertaking as the commitment is often shared with family members and others and/or public services. The results suggest that ideal types about complementarity and substitution may understate the complex interplay between informal care and the public services (and potential other providers). The findings may suggest a need for more empirical research about ‘Care Cultures’ and expose simplistic representations of welfare societies; informal care plays a major—and increasing—role also in Sweden, a country with extensive public services.

  • 6.
    Jönson, H.
    et al.
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Harnett, T.
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Department of Social Work, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ethnically profiled nursing home care in Sweden – from culture to lifestyle: Äldreboenden med etnisk profil i Sverige–från kultur till livsstil2018In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates presentations of ethnically profiled nursing homes in Sweden, and in particular what categories these nursing homes target and what problems they are suggested to solve. The findings relate to the construction of older immigrants and to shifting ideas on responsibilities of the Swedish welfare state. Data consisted of 68 articles from newspapers and journals between the period of 1995 and 2015 that were analysed using qualitative methods. Guided by a social constructionist approach focusing on claims-making, two comprehensive ‘problem frames’ were identified: the language and culture frame and the choice of lifestyle frame. The main finding of the paper was that, since about 2007, descriptions of ethnically profiled nursing homes have come to be included in a broader category of profiled nursing homes such as ‘all inclusive’ and ‘hotel-concept’, within a system that focuses on choice based on special needs, lifestyle and interest. The paper concludes that, although this way of framing ethnically profiled nursing homes works against the construction of older immigrants as a problematic category, there is a risk that the emphasis on choice of lifestyle conceals or justifies inequalities based on social class.

  • 7. Sandberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Pringle, Keith
    Keeping the family balance: Adult daughters’ experiences of roles and strategies when supporting caring fathers2009In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 233-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian countries represent a progressive approach to gender equality and transitions of traditional gender roles but little attention has been paid to gender equality in old age and how normative constructions of gender intersect in the lives of family carers. The aim of this study was to understand how adult daughters experience their roles and strategies when supporting fathers caring for an ill mother. A sample of eight daughters shared their experiences through in-depth interviews. The findings show that the daughters provide substantial and crucial effort and are intimately involved in the caring for their father and the sole contributors towards the emotional support of their fathers. They tend to devote a lot of energy towards picturing their family as ‘normal’ in terms of the family members adopting traditional roles and activities inside as well as outside the family context. In conclusion, the lack of understanding about gender as a ‘norm producer’ is something that needs to be further elaborated upon in order for professionals to encounter norm-breaking behaviours. The daughters’ position as family carers is often assumed and taken for granted since the intersecting structures that impact on the situations of the daughters are largely invisible.

  • 8.
    Skillmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Department of Social Work, Linneaus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Oscarsson, Lars
    Department of Social Sciences, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Applying standardisation tools in social work practice from the perspectives of social workers, managers, and politicians: a Swedish case study2018In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports findings from a case study of the practical application of a standardisation tool in everyday social work practice. The example tool used herein is the Swedish version of the UK-based Integrated Children's System, which in Sweden is known as Children's Needs in Focus (Barns Behov i Centrum; BBIC). The study analyses group and individual interviews with social workers, managers and politicians using concepts from implementation research and the micro-sociological concept of accounts. The findings demonstrate how participants describe and explain their deviations from the BBIC manual and from the more informal intentions of the tool. Such deviations are conditioned by the fact that professionals often employ their own discretion in their work, which is necessarily inherent in human service occupations such as social work. Although the BBIC was initially well received, the professionals describe how that reception eventually turned to scepticism and a more critical stance toward the manual. This can be attributed to both absence of significant necessary implementation conditions and key organisational factors as well as a lack of compatibility between the tool's construction and users' needs and expectations. This article also discusses the general socio-technical and organisational implications of these findings.

1 - 8 of 8
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