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  • 1.
    Andersson, David Emanuel
    et al.
    Department of Economics and Finance, School of Business and Management, RMIT University Vietnam, Vietnam.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Phase transitions as a cause of economic development2019In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 670-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Economic development spans centuries and continents. Underlying infrastructural causes of development, such as institutions and networks, are subject to slow but persistent change. Accumulated infrastructural changes eventually become so substantial that they trigger a phase transition. Such transitions disrupt the prior conditions for economic activities and network interdependencies, requiring radically transformed production techniques, organizations and location patterns. The interplay of economic equilibria and structural changes requires a theoretical integration of the slow time scale of infrastructural change and the fast time scale of market equilibration. This paper presents a theory that encompasses both rapidly and slowly changing variables and illustrates how infrequent phase transitions caused four logistical revolutions in Europe over the past millennium. 

  • 2.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Import flows: extraregional linkages stimulating renewal of regional sectors?2013In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 2999-3017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the role of regional import flows for renewal of regional industries. The hypothesis is that imports stimulate renewal of local industries by being vehicles for technology diffusion and means by which local firms can exploit advantages of global specialisation. We find robust and positive relationships between high-quality imports and renewal of regional exports, where the latter are measured by the introduction of novel export products of local firms. Connectedness to international markets via import networks appears to be a stimulus for the renewal of regional exports. 

  • 3.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Qian, Haifeng
    Cleveland State University.
    China’s Development Disconnect2012In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 628-648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China is currently seeking to transform its economic structure from a traditional industrial to a more innovative, human-capital driven, and knowledge-based economy. Our research examines the effects of three key factors on Chinese regional development in an attempt to gauge to what degree China has transformed from an industrial to a knowledge-based economy, based on higher levels of (1) technology and innovation, (2) human capital and knowledge/professional/creative occupations, and (3) factors like tolerance, universities, and amenities which act on the flow of the first two. We employ structural equation models to gauge the effects of these factors on the economic performance of Chinese regions. Our research generates four key findings. First, the distribution of talent (measured both as human capital and as knowledge – professional and creative occupations) is considerably more concentrated than in the US or other advanced economies. Second, universities are the key factor in shaping the distribution both of talent and of technological innovation. Third, tolerance also plays a role in shaping the distribution of talent and technology across Chinese regions. Fourth, and perhaps most strikingly, we find that neither talent nor technology is associated with the economic performance of Chinese regions. This stands in sharp contrast to the pattern in advanced economies and suggests that the Chinese economic model, at least at the time of data collection, appears to be far less driven by the human capital or technology factors that propel more advanced economies. This, in turn, suggests that China is likely to face substantial obstacles in moving from its current industrial stage of development to a more knowledge-based economy.

  • 4.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Florida, Richard
    Stolarick, Kevin
    From Music Scenes to Music Clusters: The Economic Geography of Music in the U.S., 1970-20002010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 785-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Where do musicians locate, and why do creative industries such as music continue to cluster? This paper analyzes the economic geography of musicians and the recording industry in the US from 1970 to 2000, to shed light on the locational dynamics of music and creative industries more broadly. We examine the role of scale and scope economies in shaping the clustering and concentration of musicians and music industry firms. We argue that these two forces are bringing about a transformation in the geography of both musicians and music industry firms, evidenced in a shift away from regionally clustered, genre-specific music scenes, such as Memphis or Detroit, toward larger regional centers such as New York City and Los Angeles, which offer large markets for music employment and concentrations of other artistic and cultural endeavors that increase demand for musicians. We use population and income to probe for scale effects and look at concentrations of other creative and artistic industries to test for scope effects, while including a range of control variables in our analysis. We use lagged variables to determine whether certain places are consistently more successful at fostering concentrations of musicians and the music industry and to test for path dependency. We find some role for scale and scope effects and that both musicians and the music industry are concentrating in a relatively small number of large regional centers.

  • 5.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Coenen, Lars
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Explaining spatial patterns of innovation: Analytical and synthetic modes of knowledge creation in the Medicon Valley life-science cluster2008In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 1040-1056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors address the dichotomy around ‘proximate’ and ‘distant’ learning processes by looking specifically at the characteristics of the knowledge-creation process. By way of suggesting an alternative conceptualization to the well-known tacit–codified knowledge dichotomy they propose a distinction between ‘analytical’ and ‘synthetic’ modes of knowledge creation. Analytical knowledge creation refers to the understanding and explaining of features of the (natural) world. Synthetic knowledge creation refers to the design or construction of something to attain functional goals. By applying this framework to qualitative empirics from the Medicon Valley life-science cluster, the authors demonstrate the complementarity of globally distributed analytical knowledge creation and locally oriented synthetic knowledge creation.

  • 6. Suarez-Villa, L.
    et al.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The Development of Sweden’s R&D-intensive Electronics Industries: Exports, Outsourcing and Territorial Distribution1996In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 783-817Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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