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  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    How local are spatial density externalities? Neighbourhood effects in agglomeration economies2016In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1082-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geographic scale at which density externalities operate is analysed in this paper. Using geocoded high-resolution data, the analysis is focused on exogenously determined within-city squares (‘neighbourhoods’) of 1 km2. The analysis confirms a city-wide employment density–wage elasticity and an economically significant density–wage elasticity at the neighbourhood level that attenuate sharply with distance. Panel estimates over 20 years suggest a neighbourhood density–wage elasticity of about 3%, while the city-wide elasticity is about 1%. It is argued that the neighbourhood level is more prone to capture learning, e.g. through knowledge and information spillovers. This interpretation is supported by (1) significantly larger neighbourhood elasticities for university educated workers and (2) sharper attenuation with distance of the effect for such workers.

  • 2.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Martin, Hanna
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Path renewal in old industrial regions: Possibilities and limitations for regional innovation policy2015In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 850-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the potential, barriers and limitations for regional innovation policy to facilitate industrial renewal in old industrial regions. It draws on a case analysis of the policy programme ‘Biorefinery of the Future’ geared to promote renewal of the forest industry in Northern Sweden. It is shown that infusion of radical emergent technology is necessary for new regional path development, but not sufficient. To avoid a singular focus on technology-push, policy should pay more attention to complementary experimentation processes in relation to demand-side characteristics, firm strategies and business models as well as regulatory aspects. Moreover, coordination between regional innovation policy and adjacent domains and levels of policy-making is needed as some of the most pressing obstacles for renewal are not specific to the region but instead to the industry at large.

  • 3.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Nationalekonomi.
    Mihaescu, Oana
    Högskolan Dalarna, Kulturgeografi.
    Nilsson, Helena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    Högskolan Dalarna, Nationalekonomi.
    What happens when IKEA comes to town?2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 313-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of a new IKEA store on retail revenues, employment and inflow of purchasing power in the entry municipalities as well as in neighbouring municipalities were investigated using data from 2000–11. A propensity score-matching method was used to find non-IKEA entry municipalities that were as similar as possible to the entry municipalities based on the situation before entry. The results indicate that IKEA entry increased entry municipality durable goods revenues by about 20% and employment by about 17%. Only small and, in most cases, statistically insignificant effects were found in neighbouring municipalities.

  • 4.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, Martin Prosperity Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Adler, Patrick
    Department of Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    The city as innovation machine2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 86-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper puts cities and urban regions at the very centre of the processes of innovation and entrepreneurship. It combines the insights of Jane Jacobs and recent urban research on the role of the city with the literature on innovation and entrepreneurship going back to Joseph Schumpeter. Innovation and entrepreneurship and their geography privileges the firm, industry clusters and/or the individual and poses the city as a container for them. By marrying Jacobs’ insights on cities to those of Schumpeter on innovation, it is argued that innovation and entrepreneurship do not simply take in place in cities but in fact require them.

  • 5.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    The geography of inequality: Difference and determinants of wage and income inequality across US metros2016In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 79-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the geographic variation in wage inequality and income inequality across US metros. The findings indicate that the two are quite different. Wage inequality is closely associated with skills, human capital, technology and metro size, in line with the literature, but these factors are only weakly associated with income inequality. Furthermore, wage inequality explains only 15% of income inequality across metros. Income inequality is more closely associated with unionization, race and poverty. No relationship is found between income inequality and average incomes and only a modest relationship between it and the percentage of high-income households.

  • 6.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Rentfrow, Peter J.
    Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK.
    The Happiness of Cities2013In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 613-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the factors that shape the happiness of cities, whereas much of the existent literature has focused on the happiness of nations. It is argued that in addition to income, which has been found to shape national-level happiness, human capital levels will play an important role in the happiness of cities. Metropolitan-level data from the 2009 Gallup–Healthways Survey are used to examine the effects of human capital on city happiness, controlling for other factors. The findings suggest that human capital plays the central role in the happiness of cities, outperforming income and every other variable.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Transportation Infrastructure for the Mälar Region1994In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 169-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Florida, Richard
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Stolarick, Kevin
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Beautiful places: the role of perceived aesthetic beauty in community satisfaction2011In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 33-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research uses a large survey sample of individuals across United States locations to examine the effects of beauty and aesthetics on community satisfaction. The paper conducts these estimations by ordinary least-squares, ordered logit, and multinomial logit. The findings confirm that beauty is significantly associated with community satisfaction. Other significant factors include economic security, schools, and social interaction. Further, community-level factors are significantly more important than individual demographic characteristics in explaining community satisfaction.

  • 9.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Stolarick, Kevin
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Lobo, José
    Arizona State University, USA.
    Distinguishing neighbourhood and workplace network effects on individual income: Evidence from Sweden2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 1652-1664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distinguishing neighbourhood and workplace network effects on individual income: evidence from Sweden. Regional Studies. This paper investigates the effects on individuals’ income of two social networks in which individuals are embedded: their residential neighbourhood and their workplace. The paper avails itself of Swedish micro-level data, which make it possible to identify individual workers, and with whom they live next to and work. The spatial extent of the non-workplace social network – from block group to the whole of a metropolitan area – is varied to examine which social community most affects an individual’s income. The paper distinguishes between individuals engaged in high- and low-skilled occupations so as to starkly control for differences in education, training and skills. The results suggest that residential neighbourhoods do matter for individuals’ income, although the effect is stronger for low-skilled individuals. For both high- and low-skilled individuals, their workplace group skill has the greatest effect on income, but the effect is negative for high-skilled and positive for low-skilled individuals.

  • 10.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Institutional conditions and innovation systems: On the impact of regional policy on firms in different sectors[Les conditions institutionnelles et les systèmes d'innovation: À propos de l'impact de la politique régionale sur les entreprises dans divers secteurs]2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutional conditions and innovation systems: on the impact of regional policy on firms in different sectors, Regional Studies. This paper deals with institutional conditions in regional innovation systems: how institutions affect the organization of innovation activities among firms; and in what ways regional policy initiatives can be supportive. The analysis draws on data on innovation networks, activities, and regional policies targeting the life science, media and food industries in Scania, Sweden. The study takes account of the ways in which regional policies can impact individuals' and organizations' action in relation to each other by being internalized. It is argued that such ability is decisive for the success or failure of the policy initiative.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Spatial spillovers and households’ involvement in the non-farm sector: evidence from rural Rwanda2019In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 731-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper tests for external effects of local economic activity on non-farm income using survey data from Rwanda. The empirical analysis uses a random sample of 8071 households and a multilevel model to mitigate correlations between individual outcomes and geographical variables. Findings show a positive association between a higher initial local diversity of economic activity and non-farm earnings. Results also point to the importance of access to markets and services indicating that an important part of a household’s capacity to earn non-farm income is associated with factors that are external to the household.

  • 12.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Rader Olsson, Amy
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Start-ups and Local Entrepreneurial Social Capital in the Municipalities of Sweden2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 974-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Start-ups and local entrepreneurial social capital in the municipalities of Sweden, Regional Studies. This paper contains one of the first empirical attempts to investigate the influence of local entrepreneurial social capital (ESC) on start-up propensity. A unique database, including not only total start-ups but also data on start-ups divided into six sectors, is used to study the impact of ESC on start-ups per capita. The results support the hypothesis that social capital, measured both as (1) firm perception of local public attitudes to entrepreneurship and (2) the share of small businesses influences start-up propensity in Swedish municipalities. The findings also support previous results suggesting that social capital has a somewhat stronger influence in rural areas than in urban areas.

  • 13.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Nilsson, Elin
    Measuring enterprises' investments in social capital: a pilot study2005In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1079-1094Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The impact of spatial externalities: Skills, education and plant productivity2015In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 2053-2069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the role of a broad range of spatial externalities in explaining average labour productivity of Swedish manufacturing plants. The main findings show positive effects from general urbanization economies and labour market matching, as well as a negative effect from within-industry diversity. These results confirm previous research despite methodological differences,which implies wider generalizability. Additionally, the empirical findings support Marshall–Arrow–Romer (MAR) and Porter externalities, i.e. positive effects from specialization and competition. No evidence is found of Jacobs externalities, neither when measured as between-industry diversity nor as within-industry diversity. Finally, plant-specific characteristics play a key role in explaining plant-level productivity.

  • 15.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Andersson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University.
    Which Types of Relatedness Matter in Regional Growth? Industry, Occupation and Education2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 523-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a conceptual discussion of relatedness, which suggests a focus on individuals as a complement to firms and industries. The empirical relevance of the main arguments is tested by estimating the effects of related and unrelated variety in education and occupation among employees, as well as in industries, on regional growth. The results show that occupational and educational related variety are positively correlated with productivity growth, which supports the conceptual discussion put forth in the paper. In addition, related variety in industries is found to be negative for productivity growth, but positive for employment growth.

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