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  • 1.
    Håkansson, Carita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Ahlborg, Gunnar
    Sahlgrenska akademin vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Perceptions of employment, domestic work, and leisure as predictors of health among women and men2010In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 150-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aims of this longitudinal study were to analyse whether perceptions of employment,domestic work and leisure were predictors of health among women and men, and whether the predictors revealed were the same for both genders. Method: A random sample comprising of 2,683 employees in public health care and social insurance offices (2286 women and 397 men) in western Sweden, answered a survey twice, within a two-year interval. Results: The results showed that perceptions of low stress, good balance and high meaning in the occupations of everyday life predicted both good self-rated health and balanced work attendance among women but not among men. For men, the most important predictor of both good self-rated health and balanced work attendance was low work place stress. Conclusion: The men seemed to have a better balance between employment, domestic work, and leisure than the women. Furthermore, the results indicated that leisure might be a more pronounced health protector for women than for men.

  • 2.
    Håkansson, Carita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    Göteborgs universitet, inst för arbetsterapi och fysioterapi.
    Sonn, Ulla
    Göteborgs universitet, inst för arbetsterapi och fysioterapi.
    Achieving balance in everyday life: Insights from women with stress-related disorders2006In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing interest in developing a conceptual understanding of the experience of balance in everyday life, from an occupational perspective. The purpose of this study was to gain insights about balance in the everyday lives of women with stress-related disorders. Data were gathered from 19 women who were past the first phase of recovery from a stress-related disorder and participated in one of five focus groups. Analysis revealed that the participants experienced a continuum between imbalance and balance in everyday life. The themes that emerged were image of occupational self, strategies to manage and control everyday life, occupational repertoire, and occupational experience. Balance in everyday life was achieved through a dynamic interaction between these themes, which the women characterised as respecting their own values, needs, and resources; having strategies to manage and control everyday life; having a harmonious occupational repertoire; and engaging in personally meaningful occupation. Engagement in personally meaningful occupation appears to be a mechanism that enables people to achieve balance in everyday life by enabling them to develop a successful occupational selfimage, manageability, control, and a harmonious occupational repertoire. Well-being seems to be the outcome of balance in everyday life, and lack of balance is experienced as overload.

  • 3.
    Håkansson, Carita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Matuska, Kathleen
    Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, St. Catherine University, USA..
    How Life Balance is Perceived by Swedish Women Recovering from a Stress-related Disorder: A Validation of the Life Balance Model2010In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 112-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This phenomenological research is the second part of two analysis phases. The purpose of the first analysis phase was to gain insights about the experiences, perceptions, and attitudes about lifestyle balance of 19 women who were recovering from stress-related disorders. The findings indicated that the women perceived both balance and imbalance relative to their image of occupational self, strategies to manage and control everyday life, occupational repertoire, and occupational experience. The purpose of the second analysis phase was to re-analyze the data for its congruence with the Matuska and Christiansen life balance model using a matrix system, and to test the validity of the model. Results from the second phase are reported. When discussing the continuum between balance and imbalance in their lives, the women described occupations that met needs related to each of the five lifestyle balance model dimensions. They felt balanced or imbalanced depending on whether they were able to maintain their physical health, nurture important relationships, create a positive identity, pursue rewarding and stimulating occupations, and manage their time and energy to achieve daily goals and renewal. These findings provide additional validity for the life balance model, which may be used in occupational science.

  • 4.
    Jansson, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Occupation and basic income through the lens of Arendt’s vita activa2019In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a debate about the meaning and importance of paid work for individuals as well as for society. On the one hand, paid work is considered the only way to secure general welfare. On the other hand, the Jobs Strategy urged by the OECD as the only possible model for achieving welfare is questioned and challenged through the idea of basic income. While basic income is frequently discussed within other disciplines, it is scarcely raised within occupational science, despite its obvious relevance. In this article, the significance of paid work and the possible consequences of introducing basic income are raised. Paid work may have healthy effects, but for many people worldwide dependence on paid work for basic security implies unhealthy, hazardous, and unsecure circumstances. Basic income may have a substantial impact on people’s occupational patterns as well as their experiences of occupational meaning. Three underlying rationales for introducing basic income can be traced: i) abolish a bureaucratic payment transfer system and maintain consumption, ii) diminish poverty and enhance a self-determined life, and iii) deepen democratization. These three rationales are discussed through the lens of Arendt’s vita activa: labor, work and action. Rationales underlying claims for basic income have substantially different underlying ideologies and are therefore important to scrutinize. Rationales mainly building on maintaining consumption imply a risk that people are reduced to homo consumens and denizens. Developing all modalities creates opportunities for occupational justice as well as inclusion and citizenship.

  • 5.
    Jansson, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hannah Arendt’s thoughts in relation to occupational science: A response to Turnbull2018In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 252-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his response to our article “Hannah Arendt’s vita activa: A valuable contribution to occupational science,” Turnbull (2017) outlined some tensions he perceived with our discussion of “her approach to philosophy, politics and science”. In our reply, we express appreciation of his interest in Arendt related to occupational science and the contribution his article makes, as well as clarifying some points in his critique. We argue that Turnbull’s main arguments do not address our primary purpose of presenting Arendt’s vita activa and provide examples of its relevance for occupational science. We thus focused on activity-related aspects of Arendt’s thoughts, to raise awareness of this work amongst occupational scientists. However, we are thankful for Turnbull’s reflections, which broaden the insights of Arendt’s thinking and contribute to a better understanding of human occupation. 

  • 6.
    Jansson, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hannah Arendt’s vita activa: A valuable contribution to occupational science2017In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 290-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational science is undergoing dynamic development and claims have been articulated that human occupation must be understood from multiple ontological standpoints. Hannah Arendt (1906–1975) is known for her work The Human Condition in which she explored human occupation from a philosophical and political standpoint. She distinguished the modalities labor, work and action, and labelled them vita activa. The aim of this paper is to present Arendt and her vita activa, in order to provide examples of its relevance for occupational science, showing how vita activa can assist occupational scientists to take a deeper perspective on human occupation. According to Arendt, human occupation is always conditioned. The condition for labor is necessity, which reflects human biological needs and represents the basics of life. The condition for work is utility, as something persistent and durable is produced. Action is the activity that takes place between people without the intermediary of things. Similar to occupational science, vita activa is concerned with human doing but their origins differ. Arendt also emphasized the public sphere as an arena for human occupation, a viewpoint that is shared with recent occupational science literature. The need to expand the scope of occupational science to encompass all aspects of human occupations, including the deleterious, has been expressed and vita activa can contribute to broadening this perspective. Examples of the need for sustainability in working life are also presented in this paper.

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  • 7.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björklund Carlstedt, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Occupational challenges and adaptations of vulnerable EU citizens from Romania begging in Sweden2019In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 200-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: People from European Union (EU) countries such as Latvia, Romania and Bulgaria who beg on the streets have become a common part of the townscape in Sweden. While demanding situations in their home countries drive them abroad to earn their living, those who turn to begging still face challenges in their everyday lives. Additional knowledge is needed, from their perspective, about the occupational challenges of begging, as well as how they adapt to those challenges.

    Aim: To describe the occupational challenges and related adaptations of vulnerable EU citizens begging in Sweden.

    Methods: We used a descriptive qualitative design. Individual interviews with 20 Romanian participants were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis with a deductive and inductive approach.

    Results: Six categories of occupational adaptation responses were identified: Keeping the family tier intact despite distance; Dealing with shame and stress; Managing body and mind when begging despite the monotony; Living as cheaply as possible; Trying to get a night's sleep without drawing attention to oneself; and Seeking alternatives for earning their living.

    Conclusion: Everyday life, when begging abroad, is filled with occupational challenges requiring occupational adaptations, for better or for worse, to sustain basic human needs. To further understand the needs of this vulnerable and marginalised group in society, human rights discourses that go beyond the individual level are needed.

  • 8.
    Morville, Anne-Le
    et al.
    Metropolitan University College, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    The Experience of Occupational Deprivation in an Asylum Centre: The Narratives of Three Men2013In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 212-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of three asylum-seeking men from Iran and Afghanistan. It aimed to explore how and if they experienced occupations as occupations in a Danish asylum centre and how their life experience shaped their choice and value of current occupations. In-depth narrative interviews explored the participants’ occupational history and its influence on their occupations in the asylum centre. A thematic analysis showed that the participants had been subjected to occupational disruption and deprivation by politically oppressive systems even before their flight. Their occupations in Denmark were to a certain extent influenced by their earlier occupations and the current occupational deprivation they all experienced was due to limited possibilities in the centre. Although they tried their best to fill their days and create structure, there was a loss of valued occupations and a profound sense of occupational deprivation. One of the participants had been subjected to torture and he experienced occupational deprivation to a greater extent. The findings suggest that further research should include exposure to torture as a key component when examining the occupational deprivation of asylum seekers.

  • 9.
    Morville, Anne-Le
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jessen-Winge, Christina
    Occupational Therapy Programme, Metropolitan University College Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Creating a bridge: An asylum seeker’s ideas for social inclusion2019In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Asylum seekers often experience social exclusion, beyond work and productivity. For this group, social inclusion is needed in order to participate in their new society and regain control over daily life and occupations, as well as prevent health problems. Social inclusion has been discussed within occupational science, and a collaborative approach such as the Participatory Occupational Justice Framework recommended to be followed. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the asylum seekers? perspective on social inclusion, which this article begins to address through the lived experience of one participant.

    Method: Framed as a phenomenological study, data were collected through interview and articles written by the asylum-seeking participant. The data were analysed using Giorgi?s method as modified by Malterud (2017).

    Results: The participant's ideas revolved around the components of Bogeas and colleague's (2017) description of social inclusion and revealed the problems that he experienced daily in the asylum centre. His suggestions for change and social inclusion included the need for asylum seekers to take part in the daily work in the centre, establishing channels of information, and a residents' council to support collaboration with the local population. The participant stressed that social inclusion should be a two-way process, with both sides taking responsibility for working with the challenges.

    Conclusion: Although there are objective conditions that might limit social inclusion, a collaborative and participatory approach offers the opportunity for social inclusion and participation in occupation. Employing such an approach would facilitate the health, well-being, and inclusion of asylum seekers; and promote occupational justice for an otherwise marginalised population.

  • 10.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Occupational balance from the interpersonal perspective: A scoping review2019In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 537-545Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Occupational balance is an important concept in occupational science but it has mostly been studied from an individual rather than an interpersonal perspective, i.e. the extent to which one individual’s occupational balance affects and is affected by others. The aim of this review was to describe the extent to which occupational balance has been recently considered from an interpersonal perspective.

    Methods: A scoping review methodology was used. Articles published between 2014 and 2017 that met the following inclusion criteria were included: full articles reporting primary research; published in English; using “occupational balance”, “balance in everyday life”, or “life balance” in the abstract, key words, or title; having an occupational focus on balance; and providing relevant information in relation to the interpersonal perspective.

    Results: Nine articles were included. The interpersonal perspective was mostly seen in relation to partners or families, showing the positive impact of support and the negative impact of meeting other’s needs in mothers. One article addressed aspects related to organizations and attitudes at the workplace in parents with young children.

    Conclusion: The findings reveal the importance of considering the occupational balance of both the individual and those around him or her while also showing some of the complexity of occupational balance. The limited number of articles identified indicates that there is still a lack of research using an interpersonal perspective, suggesting that further examination of the interpersonal influence on occupational balance may be a fruitful avenue to pursue. 

  • 11.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Lunds Universitet.
    Jonsson, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Occupational balance: A scoping review of current research and identified knowledge gaps2015In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 160-169Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports a comprehensive review of the research conducted regarding occupational balance. A scoping study method was used to explore and describe current research about occupational balance and to identify research gaps. Twenty-two articles published between 2009 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. The articles reported studies conducted in eight countries on four continents, but the majority were conducted in Europe and North America. The articles contributed to knowledge about the concept itself, its importance, levels of occupational balance, and the relationship between occupational balance and health and well-being. They also described what is important for occupational balance or how to enhance/create/recreate it and differences between people. Several research gaps were identified which include the need for studies about perceptions of occupational balance among people beyond western societies. Furthermore, systematic research is warranted with regards to levels of occupational balance, and how to enhance it.

  • 12.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Matuska, Kathleen
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Validating the model of lifestyle balance on a working Swedish population2012In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 106-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analysis of data from a previously conducted grounded theory study exploring perceptions of life balance among 19 working adults without recent long term sick leave was carried out. The aim of this secondary analysis was to use these perceptions of life balance to validate the Model of Lifestyle Balance proposed by Matuska and Christiansen. For the validation, a matrix was used. The results showed that Matuska and Christiansen's five need-based dimensions were represented by the participants’ perceptions of life balance, but also an additional aspect not included in the model. The participants stressed healthy habits in relation to sleep, exercise and eating, and good relationships as important for life balance. Furthermore, it was described as important to perceive sufficient challenge and meaningfulness in their occupations and to organize time and energy. Finally, the participants stressed financial security as important for life balance. These findings provide additional evidence of the validity of the Model of Lifestyle Balance, a model that appears to be useful in occupational science.

  • 13.
    Widmark, Elin
    et al.
    County Council of Värmland, Sweden.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Occupation according to adolescents: Daily occupations categorized based on adolescents’ experiences2019In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 470-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The categorizations of occupation commonly used in occupational science and therapy today lack empirical foundations for children and adolescents. Without common definition or conceptualization, the ability to understand and evaluate the impact of occupation on people’s lives is limited. Research in these areas has predominantly been conducted with adults and research about children and adolescents has mainly focused on specific occupations and/or diagnoses. The study aimed to identify experience-based categories of occupation from the perspective of adolescents. Through qualitative interviews with 10 participants aged 12-15, data were collected and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Eight experience-based categories were identified: experiencing change of time perception, experiencing enjoyment and satisfaction, experiencing challenge and competence, experiencing boredom and tediousness, experiencing deeper engagement, experiencing relaxation and recovery, experiencing need, necessity or neutrality, and experiencing self-identification. The categories cover a variety of experiences, and show connections to earlier research. The findings show a possible way of understanding adolescents’ experience of occupation, and contribute to earlier research with an adolescent perspective. Further research is needed to confirm their relevance within other groups and contexts and can be used in further exploration of conceptualization.

1 - 13 of 13
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