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  • 1.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Tödtling, Franz
    Institute for Regional Development and Environment, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria.
    Constructing regional advantage: Towards state-of-the-art regional innovation system policies in Europe?2011In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 1133-1139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core arguments of the constructed regional advantage (CRA) approach stem from the work that started in Brussels in an expert group appointed by DG Research of the EU Commission. In 2006, DG Research launched the final report on "Constructing Regional Advantage" as the new way of taking on and combating new challenges and problems of globalization for European regions (Asheim et al., 2006). CRA means turning comparative advantage into competitive advantage through an explicit policy push promoting a Chamberlinian monopolistic competition based on product differentiation creating unique products, an assumption which was fundamental for Porter's cluster approach also. While building on the lessons from the dynamic principle of the theory of competitive advantage (Porter, 1990, 1998) as well as of the innovation system approach (Lundvall, 2008) emphasizing that competitiveness can be influenced by innovation policies and supporting regulatory and institutional frameworks, the constructed advantage approach recognizes the important interplay between industrial and institutional dynamics as well as calls for greater attention to multi-level governance. What is especially highlighted is the role of a proactive public-private partnership and impact of the public sector and public policy support by acknowledging to a greater extent the importance of institutional complementarities in knowledge economies. This approach represents an improved understanding of key regional development challenges as well as a better anticipation and response to the problems by addressing system failures of lack of connectivity in regional innovation systems (RIS).

  • 2.
    Benneworth, Paul
    et al.
    Center for Higher Education Policy Studies, University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Exploring the multiple roles of Lund University in strengthening Scania's regional innovation system: Towards institutional learning?2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 1645-1664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities are increasingly seen as potential contributors to regional innovative capacity by serving as local knowledge conduits, bringing global state-of-the-art science and technology into the region. In practice, however, more active university engagement with their regional innovation systems is not as straightforward as it may seem. The article uses examples from a successful case by which less successful regions could be inspired. Our analysis considers how various forms of technological learning intersecting within Lund University around three distinct sectoral engagement efforts have been built up and how this created new structural regional innovation capacity.

  • 3.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Putting constructed regional advantage into Swedish practice2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 587-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of the pre-history and evolution of a regional innovation system initiative supporting activities at the intersection of traditional food production and modern biotechnology. Drawing on established ideas on the triple helix of industry, university and government and its impact on innovative capacity (as they are formulated in the regional innovation systems approach) and more recently introduced ideas on differentiated industrial knowledge bases, the study illustrates how regional innovation system support initiatives are formulated and implemented in close dialogue with the actors and activities constituting the systems under support. The initiative analysed in this paper is a good example of pro-active and fine-tuned regional innovation policy, referred to as constructed regional advantage. By focusing on an initiative targeting the renewal of a mature industry in a declining phase of its life cycle, the paper fills a gap in the literature which so far has dealt mostly with emerging industries at the start of their life cycle. Two innovation trajectories that contributed to the formulation of the initiative, and now benefits from it, are used to illustrate the arguments.

  • 4.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nodes, networks and proximities: On the knowledge dynamics of the Medicon Valley biotech cluster2004In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 1003-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical research on the knowledge dynamics of biotechnology demonstrates a dual local-global knowledge flow pattern. The sector is characterised by strong spatial concentration around nodes of excellence that are interconnected through a global network. This requires a specification of the notion of proximity as a facilitator of learning processes which emphasises its multifaceted configuration. This study highlights the significance of relational proximity within epistemic communities shaping innovation processes across multi-spatial scales. These arguments are illustrated with a database-survey on collaboration in scientific publication by 109 biotechnology firms in the Danish-Swedish life-science cluster Medicon Valley.

  • 5.
    Eliasson, Kent
    et al.
    Swedish Agency for Growth Policy Analysis.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Determinants of Net Migration to Rural Areas, and the Impacts of Migration on Rural Labour Markets and Self-Employment in Rural Sweden2015In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 693-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across most of Europe, the countryside seems to show a polarized development in which large districts are depopulating, while certain areas, mainly around big- and mid-sized cities, are increasing in population. The latter development is often described in concepts of “rural gentrification” and “rurbanization”, symbolizing a transformation of rural communities to communities with urban values and lifestyles. Most studies of the effects of these processes have focused on social and cultural consequences, as e.g. the displacements of lower-income households with higher-income residents and of rural culture and values with urban ones. This paper examines the phenomenon from another perspective, namely the effects of the “rurbanization” processes on countryside’s labour markets and economic life. This paper aims at analysing the determinants of net migration to rural areas in general and to different types of regions, and the impacts of inmigration on rural labour markets, self-employment and other socio-economic conditions in Sweden for the period of 2003–2005. We find that net migration into rural areas increases with the size of adjacent local and regional centres, whereas net migration decreases with the average commuting distance of workers in the rural areas. When comparing in-migrants to rural areas with rural area stayers, our results indicate that the former has lower incomes, a lower employment ratio and a lower degree of entrepreneurial activities. These differences could—at least partly—be explained by the fact that rural area stayers were on average 6 years older than rural area inmigrants, i.e. the two groups were in different stages of their life cycles.

  • 6. Fritsch, Michael
    et al.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Werwatz, Axel
    Regional Innovation Policy (Editorial)2005In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 1123-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Bill, F.
    Olaison, L.
    The Incubus Paradox: Attempts at Foundational Rethinking of the ‘SME Support Genre2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1135-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lindholm-Dahlstrand, Å
    Bridging the Functional and Territorial Rationales – Proposing and Integrating Framework for Regional Dynamics2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1117-1134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation in symbolic industries: the geography and organization of knowledge sourcing2011In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 1183-1203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with geographical and organizational patterns of knowledge flows in the media industry of southern Sweden, an industry that is characterized by a strong ?symbolic? knowledge base. The aim is to address the question of the local versus the non-local as the prime arena for knowledge exchange, and to examine the organizational patterns of knowledge sourcing with specific attention paid to the nature of the knowledge sourced. Symbolic industries draw heavily on creative production and a cultural awareness that is strongly embedded in the local context; thus knowledge flows and networks are expected to be most of all locally configured, and firms to rely on less formalized knowledge sources rather than scientific knowledge or principles. Based on structured and semi-structured interviews with firm representatives, these assumptions are empirically assessed through social network analysis and descriptive statistics. Our findings show that firms rely above all on knowledge that is generated in project work through learning-by-doing and by interaction with other firms in localized networks.

  • 10.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Tecnologico de Monterrey.
    Resituating Proximity and Knowledge Cross-fertilization in Clusters by Means of International Trade Fairs2008In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 643-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates a proximity framework and provides empirical evidence of how knowledge cross-fertilization is instigated at international trade fairs (ITFs) and continued in a cluster network. This paper applies a case study method relying on social network analysis to explore the knowledge cross-fertilization initiated at ITFs and furthered at a Swedish cluster. The findings suggest that firms participating at ITFs translate and re-articulate the acquired external knowledge through their interactions in the cluster network. Creating awareness of the ITFs' influence on innovation is significant for policy-makers and scholars.

  • 11.
    Rutten, Roel
    et al.
    Tilburg University.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Boekema, Frans
    Tilburg University, Nijmegen School of Management, Radboud University Nijmegen.
    The Spatial Dimension of Social Capital2010In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 863-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital pertains to the social relations between humans, and since these social relations have a spatial dimension, so too does social capital. However, the spatial dimension of social capital has received little attention in the literature so far. Even in a glo-balizing world where electronic and virtual communication have the potential to defeat the need for geographical proximity, it is still relevant to consider the spatial dimension of social capital. After all, human beings exist most prominently in real rather than in virtual space. This special issue undertakes an inquiry into the spatial dimension of social capital from an explorative perspective. It aims to further theoretical and empirical understanding of the spatial dimension of social capital. As editors we recognize that the debate on social capital is still ongoing in the literature and that it is fed from different, sometimes conflicting perspectives. Therefore, the spatial dimension of social capital can only be conceptualized in the light of these different perspectives, which necessitates an explorative approach. Nonetheless, the various contributions of this special issue allow several conclusions that are valuable to the ongoing discussion on social capital and its spatial dimension. In the first part of this introductory paper, we discuss social capital from a conceptual angle, as we distinguish between two key approaches (the "structuralist" and "interaction-ist" approaches). We then argue how these approaches may be helpful to the understanding of the spatial dimension of social capital. In the second part, we introduce the various contributions and explain how they contribute to the aim of this special issue.

  • 12. Thapa, R. K.
    et al.
    Iakovleva, T.
    Foss, Lene
    UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Responsible research and innovation: a systematic review of the literature and its applications to regional studies2019In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While innovation should be about socioeconomic transformation of society, concerns have been raised about its negative externalities including growing disparities within and between regions. Arguably, Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) offers a potential solution to address these concerns. However, in theory, its conceptualization and operationalization remain ambiguous. Further, in practice, this makes its application to regional development difficult. Accordingly, this study first conducts a systematic literature review of conceptual papers on RRI. It identifies themes and categorizes them into four domains: drivers, tools, outcomes and barriers. Second, these domains are applied to regional innovation studies. The paper contributes to an increased understanding of RRI and its applications to sustainable regional development as well as how RRI and regional innovation studies can benefit from each other. 

  • 13.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Adam, Frane
    Social Capital and Economic Performance: A Meta-analysis of 65 Studies2010In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 893-919Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Rutten, Roel
    Department of Organisation Studies, Tilburg University, Tilburg, Netherlands.
    Boekema, Frans
    Department of Human Geography, Nijmegen University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Social Capital, Distance, Borders and Levels of Space: Conclusions and Further Issues2010In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 965-970Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Rutten, Roel
    Boekema, Frans
    The Spatial Dimension of Social Capital2010In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 863-871Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Multiple paths of development: knowledge bases and institutional characteristics of the Swedish food sector2016In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 589-606Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore the relation between the critical knowledge base of firms and how firms respond to incentives embedded in the institutional framework surrounding them. The analysis gives us a better understanding of the complex development of the food sector in Southern Sweden in the past decades. Theoretically, the paper combines concepts of path dependency and knowledge bases, and applies this framework to a set of development trajectories of firms in the Scanian food sector. Three development paths are identifiedpath extension, path renewal and new path creation. Findings illustrate that these are rooted in different knowledge base combinations of firms, which make them respond differently to similar place- and sector-specific institutional conditions.

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