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  • 1.
    Aagaard, Annabeth
    et al.
    Department of Business Development and Technology, School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Department of Industrial Engineering & Management, Faculty of Management & Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Mapping the types of business experimentation in creating sustainable value: A case study of cleantech start-ups2021Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 279, artikkel-id 123182Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, business experimentation for sustainable value creation is explored through seven cleantech start-ups by applying the systemic combining approach. The findings reveal novel descriptions of six different business experimentation types. The study also advances our theoretical understanding of how the specific roles of learning, signaling, and convincing dominate each of the experimentation types differently and how each type of business experimentation has a distinct purpose. Furthermore, our findings propose how business experimentation types can be applied as a continuum as part of the cleantech start-ups’ sustainable value creation process. Hence, our study contributes theoretically to our understanding of business experimentation for sustainable value creation and how the different types are applied in cleantech start-ups. We conclude our treatise with managerial implications and outline fruitful future research avenues.

  • 2.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Industriell organisation och produktion.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Industriell organisation och produktion.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Industriell organisation och produktion. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Conceptual sustainable production principles in practice: Do they reflect what companies do?2017Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 141, s. 693-701Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A common understanding of sustainable production principles and the identification of sustainable manufacturing practices among practitioners are key starting points in studying how manufacturers are making their operations more sustainable. However, there is a lack of insight in the literature connecting conceptual sustainable production principles, and the practices reflecting these principles. Using semi-structured interviews founded on the sustainable production principles posed by the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, this paper presents an outlook of how companies in different industries carry out manufacturing practices related to the sustainability production principles. Results showed that the majority of sustainable manufacturing practices remain strongly centered on the environmental dimension of sustainability, with the greatest number of practices emanating from principles concerning energy and material conservation, and waste management. Similarly, reactive sustainable manufacturing practices prevailed over proactive sustainable manufacturing practices, as most of the practices aimed to comply with regulatory and market pressures. Quality and environmental management systems were acknowledged as important tools for putting sustainable production principles into practice; while Swedish environmental and social regulations were found to drive sustainable manufacturing practices. This study connects sustainable production principles with sustainable manufacturing practices and opens the way for further studies on a global or sector-specific scale.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 3.
    Alpenberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Department of Accounting and Logistics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; University of Lodz, Faculty of Management, Lodz, Poland.
    Wnuk-Pel, Tomasz
    Department of Accounting, University of Lodz, Faculty of Management, 22/26, 90-237, Lodz, Poland e Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Environmental performance measurement in a Swedish municipality – Motives and stages2022Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 370, artikkel-id 133502Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study the motives behind sustainability strategy implementation and how the performance measurement system (PMS) is modified during different development stages in a municipal organization. We use a case study approach and focus on one of the greenest municipalities in Europe, Växjö municipality in Sweden. With empirical results supporting the existence of several phases during the implementation process, our research offers two important contributions. First, it provides additional insight in the set of motives for the use of PMS during different development phases. Main stakeholders, politicians and managers of municipal departments and municipality owned companies, have revealed several “layers” of motives, which have shaped the development of the PMS. Second, the research also show that the PMS has a noticeable symbolic importance in promoting and communicating the green strategy to citizens and businesses in the region.

  • 4.
    Chung, Yeimin
    et al.
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Republic of Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Department of Economics, Sogang University, Sinsoo-dong #1, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742, Republic of Korea .
    Measurement of environmentally sensitive productivity growth in Korean industries2015Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 104, s. 380-391Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we will attempt to measure productivity growth at the industrial level using the Metafrontier Malmquist-Luenberger (MML) productivity growth index and dissect/analyze this index to reveal further information. The results will be compared with those obtained from the conventional Malmquist-Luenberger (ML) productivity growth index. Utilizing the MML-index has two advantages when compared with the ML-index: the first is that it is able to consider undesirable output as a by-product of production; and the second is that it can account for producer group heterogeneities such as production technology. Noting such advantages, we will model this study to achieve three objectives related to productivity, technology and policy effects. To separate the results of the productivity index, we estimate the changes in the technological gap between regional and global frontier technologies. The proposed index presents productivity growth and dissects its components into 14 Korean industrial sectors from 1981 to 2010. For the purpose of detailed analysis, we have divided the relevant period into three decades. The results show that technology innovation can be regarded as an important component of productivity growth, rather than merely efficiency change. Chemical and petrochemical, iron and steel and machinery are all treated as global innovators throughout the entire period. It is also inferred that the groups with higher labor productivity obtain a higher productivity growth rate as compared with their low labor productivity counterparts. Considering the heterogeneity of production technology and the time that policy is introduced, the policy implications of the results will affect the circumstances regarding investment in environmental technology.

  • 5.
    Fobbe, L.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, University of Gävle, Kungsbäcksvägen 47, Gävle, 801 76, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Logistik och verksamhetsledning. Jönköping University, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Industriell produktutveckling, produktion och design.
    The role of stakeholder interaction in sustainable business models. A systematic literature review2021Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 327, artikkel-id 129510Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholder interaction is increasingly recognised as an essential component of sustainable business models (SBMs), playing an important role for sustainable value propositions, creation and capture. However, research on the role and potential contribution of stakeholder interaction has been fragmented and not comprehensively examined. In response, a systematic literature review was conducted to provide an understanding on the topic. Forty-seven articles were systematically selected and thematically analysed according to SBM elements. Key findings demonstrate that (i) organisations need to consider five preconditions that can influence the role of stakeholder interaction in SBMs; (ii) stakeholder interaction plays different roles depending on if an organisation develops an SBM or innovates an existing BM towards sustainability; (iii) stakeholder interaction plays a multifaceted and reciprocal role in regard to sustainable value propositions, creation and capture; (iv) while the importance of interacting with a broad range of stakeholders is recognised, it is still often treated as add-on with a focus on customers and suppliers. Research gaps and managerial implications are highlighted that can support both academia and practitioners in updating the current knowledge on the role of stakeholder interaction in SBMs.

  • 6.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How sustainable is the sharing economy? On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms2019Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 206, s. 419-429Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy has evolved and spread to various sectors of the economy. Its early idea linked to the creation of more sustainable uses of resources. Since then, the development of the sharing economy has included a professionalization with self-employed suppliers rather than peers, and the question is whether the platforms following this development maintain the focus on sustainability. This paper describes and classifies the sustainability connotation of sharing economy platforms. It analyses 121 platforms derived through social media analytics to figure out whether they describe themselves as sustainable. The findings suggest that the sustainability connotation closely connects to specific sectors such as fashion, on-demand services and logistics. Meanwhile, the dominant role model platforms do not communicate about being sustainable. These findings contribute to previous research through (1) giving a systematic empirical account on the way various sharing economy platforms describe themselves in terms of sustainability, (2) pointing out the differences among the platforms, and (3) indicating the diversity in sustainability connotation among various sectors of the economy.

  • 7.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Nationalekonomi. Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Nationalekonomi, Finansiering och Statistik.
    Rashidghalam, Masoomeh
    University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran.
    Assessment of the urban circular economy in Sweden2021Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 310, artikkel-id 127475Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a general standard for the circular economy (CE), and estimates a multidimensional parametric index composed of eight components which is in line with the principles of a circular economy. The concept and index are used for evaluating the practices of a circular economy at the municipality level. The index is regressed on a number of indicators influencing the level and development of circular economy. The empirical analysis is based on data from 273 municipalities in Sweden observed 2012–18. The results suggest that there are significant differences between the municipalities in the CE index and its sub-components. Variations in the index's level are mainly attributed to their regional location, population size and density, concentration of industries, and investment programs in the circular economy's infrastructure. At a disaggregate level, the municipalities of Gotland, Härjedalen, and Mörbylånga performed well in the CE index. In contrast, Stockholm, Uppsala, and Burlöv municipalities had the lowest ranks in the CE index. The index had a growth rate of 9.7 percent over 7 years at an average annual growth rate of 1.3 percent. One policy implication of these results is that each municipality should implement a policy adapted to the sectorial structure of its economy and availability of resources. The central government should apply strict environmental regulations and provide necessary incentives for achieving environmental quality objectives. Incentive programs can target a wider application of technologies and policies used by the best performing municipalities and provide support in transferring knowledge and resources for strengthening the weak performing municipalities. 

  • 8.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Nationalekonomi. Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Tsionas, M.
    Montpellier Business School, 2300 Avenue des Moulins, Montpellier, 34080, France.
    Green innovations and patents in OECD countries2023Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 418, artikkel-id 138092Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Green transition is important for the economics of the OECD countries and their transition to cleaner production. This paper estimates a knowledge production function consisting of a system of innovation inputs, innovation outputs, and productivity with feedback effect from productivity on innovation investments. The model accounts for productivity shock, endogeneity of inputs, and their simultaneity and interdependence. Productivity shock is a latent unobserved component that is specified in terms of observable factors. The model is estimated using Bayesian methods organized around Marco Chain Sequential Monte Carlo iteration techniques also known as Particle Filtering. For the empirical part, the paper uses balanced panel data covering 27 OECD countries' green innovation and patents activities observed during the period 1990–2018. Our empirical results show evidence of significant heterogeneity in productivity and its relationship with its identified determinants. The paper also discusses the implications of these results for OECD countries’ green growth strategies.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Industriell organisation och produktion. Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH. Forskningsområde Industriell organisation och produktion.
    Magnusson, T
    Organising for environmental considerations in complex product development projects: Implications from introducing a “green” sub-project2006Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 14, nr 15-16, s. 1368-1376Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings from a case study of a product development project in which environmental performance requirements were introduced. Focus is set on how the project was organised in order to ensure that the environmental performance requirements were considered. A specific “Green” sub-project was included in the project organisation. The analysis shows that such a sub-project can: (1) serve as a means to put environmental considerations on the agenda, (2) introduce a risk for confusion regarding who is responsible for fulfilling the environmental performance requirements, (3) act as an arena for communication about the environmental performance requirements, (4) serve as a platform for environmental champions to be active, and (5) serve as a means for environmental specialists to become part of established contact networks in the product development organisation.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH. Forskningsmiljö Industriell produktion.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping university.
    Lean and green product development: two sides of the same coin?2014Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 85, nr 15, s. 104-121Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares and contrasts the lean product development (LPD) and green product development (GPD) concepts through a systematic literature review including 102 journal publications. The review resulted in 14 findings that were organised according to four dimensions: general, process, people and tools/techniques. A number of similarities between the concepts were found. For example, implementation of both concepts calls for a systems perspective where the dimensions of process-people- tools/techniques are linked holistically. Differences between the LPD and GPD concepts lie in: their goal and focus, value construct, process structure, performance metrics, and tools/techniques used. The findings do not unambiguously support that “green thinking is thinking lean” and consequently it cannot be argued that LPD and GPD are two sides of the same coin, meaning that LPD automatically leads to greener products or that GPD ensures improvements and efficiency in the product development process. However, it is reasonable to conclude that LPD and GPD belong to the same “currency”. That is, the concepts share a number of similarities that indicate a synergistic relationship. This synergistic relationship has been accentuated by a nine propositions where the potential for cross-field learning is shown.

  • 11.
    Kotilainen, Kirsi
    et al.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Ringle, Christian M.
    Institute of Human Resource Management and Organizations, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg, Germany.
    Exploring the microfoundations of end-user interests toward co-creating renewable energy technology innovations2019Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 229, s. 203-212Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy market transition, which is enabled by new affordable energy technologies and digitalization, opens novel opportunities for developing innovative energy solutions. These new technologies facilitate energy consumers to become local energy prosumers i.e. consumers and producers of energy using renewable energy sources. Hence, a central question for innovating new solutions emerges: how energy consumers and prosumers would engage in co-creating value and novel solutions with industry players? This article explores the microfoundations of energy consumers' and prosumers’ interest to participate in co-creation activities with energy industry actors. Using survey data from five European countries and by applying variance-based structural equation modeling, we find that rewards and personal characteristics influence the interest to engage in co-creation activities. Specifically, the microfoundations of the interest are built upon the need for improvements, the intrinsic rewards, and the personal adopter characteristics. Additionally, we find differing microfoundations of interest for energy consumers and prosumers. We further discuss managerial and theoretical implications of our findings and highlight avenues for future research. 

  • 12.
    Leal Filho, Walter
    et al.
    Research and Transfer Centre “Sustainable Development and Climate Change Management”, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Ulmenliet, Germany.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Fedoruk, Mariia
    Department of Ecological Economics, Institute for Ecological Economics and Management, Ukrainian National Forestry University, Ivano-Frankivsk, Lviv, Ukraine.
    Iital, Arvo
    Water and Environmental Engineering Research Group, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Moora, Harri
    Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn Centre, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Klöga, Marija
    Water and Environmental Engineering Research Group, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Voronova, Viktoria
    Water and Environmental Engineering Research Group, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    An overview of the problems posed by plastic products and the role of extended producer responsibility in Europe2019Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 214, s. 550-558Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Plastic products are easy and convenient for our everyday use, but their negative impacts on human health and the environment cannot be overlooked. The negative impacts and effects of plastic waste are now widely known and have been subject of much recent media coverage, both in Europe and on a global level. Faced with increasing amounts of plastic waste, the European Union as a whole and many European governments in particular, are currently revising the policy options available to cope with the problem. One of the tools which may be deployed with a view to reducing the pressures posed by plastic waste, is the Extended Producer Responsibility principle. It is considered to be one of the major waste management policy instruments that support the implementation of the European waste hierarchy. Its application may assist in fostering the collection and recycling of waste streams that contain plastic. This paper presents an overview of the problems posed by plastic waste, and outlines their environmental dimensions. It discusses the role of the Extended Producer Responsibility principle and provides some recommendations that may be useful in enhancing extended producer responsibility.

  • 13.
    Rashidi, Kamran
    et al.
    Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Farzipoor Saen, Reza
    Department of Industrial Management, Faculty of Management and Accounting, Karaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Karaj, Iran.
    Incorporating dynamic concept into gradual efficiency: Improving suppliers in sustainable supplier development2018Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 202, s. 226-243Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable supplier management goes beyond a simple compliance with standards and norms defined by a purchaser or being only effective in terms of economic performance in sustainable supply chain management context. Buying firms are seeking to adopt the sustainable supplier management in their supply chains as they are responsible for their suppliers’ environmental and social performances. Previous researches on sustainable supplier management indicate that evaluation of suppliers’ sustainability has attracted a great attention from practitioners while suppliers’ sustainability development has been widely neglected. One of the development programs for suppliers is performance improvement. Two significant issues need to be considered for implementation of suppliers’ improvement program; first, considering time in evaluation process and continuity in improvement, second, applying stepwise or gradual approach as sudden and huge changes in inputs and outputs may be impossible or troublesome. To this end, we propose a data envelopment analysis (DEA)-based model to incorporate dynamic concept into gradual improvement approach. Given proposed model, carry-overs between two consecutive periods are considered in a dynamic environment and also inefficient suppliers are projected to efficiency frontier step-by-step. An illustrative case study in machinery industry is proposed to indicate applicability of proposed model.

  • 14.
    Rashidi, Kamran
    et al.
    Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark; Department of Business Administration, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Noorizadeh, Abdollah
    Department of Civil Engineering, Aalto University School of Engineering, Espoo, Finland.
    Kannan, Devika
    Center for Sustainable Supply Chain Engineering, Department of Technology and Innovation, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Cullinane, Kevin
    Department of Business Administration, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Applying the triple bottom line in sustainable supplier selection: A meta-review of the state-of-the-art2020Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 269, artikkel-id 122001Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study conducts a systematic meta-literature review in the field of sustainable supplier selection. The number of published papers within the domain of sustainable supplier selection has grown considerably in recent years. Up until now, there has been no attempt quantitatively analyze the content of these published papers using bibliometric and network analysis software. Thus, this paper utilizes Gephi and Bibexcel software to conduct a quantitative review. In total, 4,882 documents were reviewed based on 336 combinations searched in Scopus and the Web of Science from 1990 to March 2018. Bibliometric, co-word and co-citation analysis are applied to quantitatively extract and analyze the content of these papers. The analysis reveals that: 1) There is a gap between industry and academia that needs to be bridged; 2) More studies in the area of global sourcing are needed; 3) Comparing the outcomes of different supplier evaluation methods is required; 4) There has been no major shift or change in the traditional supplier selection practices; 5) The ratio of the applied social criteria is relatively low compared to the total number of criteria; 6) The innovation capability of suppliers needs to be further considered; 7) More studies of sustainable supplier selection are needed in the e-procurement arena, as well as service-based industries such as healthcare, and 8) Evaluating the sustainability of suppliers in a dynamic environment needs to be further studied. The conclusion also reveals that only a limited number of journals exhibit a specific focus on the sustainable supplier selection arena; analytical and mathematical-based methods are the most applied supplier selection tools and there is a misalignment between the applied criteria in the triple bottom line. 

  • 15.
    Rashidi, Kamran
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Management, Faculty of Management and Accounting, Karaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Karaj, Iran.
    Shabani, Amir
    Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
    Farzipoor Saen, Reza
    Department of Industrial Management, Faculty of Management and Accounting, Karaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Karaj, Iran.
    Using data envelopment analysis for estimating energy saving and undesirable output abatement: A case study in the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries2015Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 105, s. 241-252Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental protection is one of the main concerns of the international community. Countries show meticulous attention to environmental issues by considering eco-efficiency. The eco-efficiency evaluation of countries is a complex and multidisciplinary topic. Data envelopment analysis has widely been applied to measure the eco-efficiency of organization for economic co-operation and development countries. In previous studies, energy inputs have not been contemplated. The subject becomes more important when there are non-discretionary factors. In this paper, the eco-efficiency of countries in the organization for economic co-operation and development is assessed given energy inputs, undesirable outputs, and non-discretionary factors. To this end, slack-based and range-adjusted measures are extended. Also, new environmental indices are introduced. The relationship between consumption of energy inputs and production of undesirable outputs can be addressed by two new environmental indices. Spearman correlation test indicates a direct and positive relationship between potential of energy saving and potential of undesirable output abatement. France, Germany, Luxemburg, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom are recognized as eco-efficient countries. South Korea and Italy have the highest and lowest potential for energy saving, respectively. Poland and Iceland are countries with the highest and lowest potential for undesirable output abatement, respectively. It can be concluded that countries producing high undesirable outputs may not operate eco-efficiently and thus have an extreme potential to save the optimum energy. Moreover, countries consuming low energy may operate eco-efficiently and have a low potential to reduce undesirable outputs.

  • 16.
    Roos, Johan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Practical Wisdom: Making and teaching the governance case for sustainability2017Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, s. 117-124Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the larger role that business education must begin playing in developing a generation of new leaders with the skills required to tackle the complex and increasingly serious challenges of sustainability. It posits a new framework for cultivating more responsible ways of thinking and acting in our current and future business students. The foundation of this framework seeks not just to complement, but to strengthen the two most common arguments for sustainability – the moral case and the economic case – with a third argument—the governance case based on Aristotle’s concept of practical wisdom (Gr. phronesis) as the ‘middle ground’ of thoughtful action. Practical wisdom stands between science (Gr. episteme) and cunning (Gr. metis) and is the habit of acting in ways that are both ethically and economically effective, but above all that support the common good. Practical wisdom strikes balances between individual and common interests, short-term and long-term perspectives as well as between adapting to and shaping the environment. The article notes how accreditation standards for business schools are now including sustainability issues and practices, but more must be done. The article proposes several fundamental changes in how we educate students to start leading businesses beyond the profit motive and corporate social responsibility (CSR) paradigms into responsible and sustainable practices that serve the common good

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 17.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Tampere University, Industrial Engineering & Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Tampere University, Industrial Engineering & Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere, Finland.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Hillebrand, Bas
    Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands .
    Driessen, Paul H.
    Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands .
    How consumers’ respect for nature and environmental self-assets influence their car brand experiences2020Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 261, artikkel-id 121023Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a novel perspective on sustainability research by exploring how two pro-environmental characteristics of consumers – respect for nature and environmental self-assets – influence their brand experiences. The study uses survey data collected on a car brand that incorporated eco-friendly advances. The results show that respect for nature has an impact on how respondents experience the eco-friendliness of brands and that eco-friendly brand experiences in turn influence general brand experiences. The findings also suggest that the effects of the two pro-environmental characteristics depend on the education level of the consumer: eco-friendly brand experiences of highly educated consumers are affected by their respect for nature, whereas those of consumers with lower education levels are affected by environmental self-assets.

  • 18.
    Short, Tim
    et al.
    School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Lee-Mortimer, Andrew
    School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Luttropp, Conrad
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH. Forskningsmiljö Industriell produktion.
    Manufacturing, sustainability, ecodesign and risk: lessons learned from a study of Swedish and English companies2012Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 37, s. 342-352Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research suggests that, despite a desire to introduce environmental concerns into New Product Design, many companies in the northwest of England have not done so. In order to understand more about why companies do or do not take on sustainability methodologies, an entirely new and rigorous approach was taken. This paper therefore presents the results of a questionnaire investigating the up-take of Eco/Sustainable Design in manufacturing companies in Sweden – a country that might be considered more environmentally progressive than the UK – and discusses them alongside the results of an identical questionnaire in the UK. The results are presented in the context of risk and risk aversion/management – in particular the risk associated with taking on board Design for Sustainability as a design method or a company strategy.

    It is found that there is no clear “winner” in sustainability between UK and Swedish engineering companies; there is encouraging news in both countries, with a desire to practice sustainability, but some that is not so good with the number of companies that actually implement relevant methodologies. It is apparent that there are still hindrances and perceived risks preventing companies taking sustainability fully on board, despite the recognition that sustainability is a “good thing”; the importance of the implementation of sustainability has not yet been fully grasped by industry and by those with the responsibility required to effect any changes.

  • 19.
    Su, B.
    et al.
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, 217, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713, South Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, 217, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713, South Korea.
    Geng, Y.
    Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016, China.
    Yu, X.
    Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016, China.
    A review of the circular economy in China: Moving from rhetoric to implementation2013Inngår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 42, s. 215-227Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy (CE) is a sustainable development strategy proposed by the central government of China, aiming to improve the efficiency of materials and energy use. This strategy, formally accepted in 2002, has been implemented and developed in a number of pilot areas in China. Scholars have produced rich studies in regard with the CE from its fundamental concept to its practical implementation. Successful enforcement of a CE can be seen as a way for China to tackle its urgent problem of environmental degradation and source scarcity. Given its importance, we provide a holistic literature review on the CE, aiming to provide a panorama of how this strategy has been developed and implemented. The review covers the concept, current practices, and assessment of the CE. To have a more numeric concept of how it has developed, we look at the performance of the CE in Dalian after its implementation of relevant policies and compare the changes with three other pilot cities, Beijing, Shanghai and Tianjin. Based on an examination of the statistical results, we identified the underlying problems and challenges for this national strategy. Finally, we offer a conclusion regarding CE’s development as well as policy recommendations for future improvement. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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