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  • 1.
    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Ling, Yan To
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Shea, Queenie Tsung Kwan
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Wang, Li-Ke
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Wang, Xiao-Yun
    GuangdongWork Injury Rehabilitation Center.
    Zheng, Yong-Ping
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Towards Wearable Comprehensive Capture and Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Activity during Human Locomotion2019In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Motion capture and analyzing systems are essential for understanding locomotion. However, the existing devices are too cumbersome and can be used indoors only. A newly-developed wearable motion capture and measurement system with multiple sensors and ultrasound imaging was introduced in this study. Methods: In ten healthy participants, the changes in muscle area and activity of gastrocnemius, plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of right leg during walking were evaluated by the developed system and the Vicon system. The existence of significant changes in a gait cycle, comparison of the ankle kinetic data captured by the developed system and the Vicon system, and test-retest reliability (evaluated by the intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC) in each channel’s data captured by the developed system were examined. Results: Moderate to good test-retest reliability of various channels of the developed system (0.512 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.988, p < 0.05), significantly high correlation between the developed system and Vicon system in ankle joint angles (0.638R ≤ 0.707, p < 0.05), and significant changes in muscle activity of gastrocnemius during a gait cycle (p < 0.05) were found. Conclusion: A newly developed wearable motion capture and measurement system with ultrasound imaging that can accurately capture the motion of one leg was evaluated in this study, which paves the way towards real-time comprehensive evaluation of muscles and joint motions during different activities in both indoor and outdoor environments.

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  • 2.
    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao
    et al.
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Wan, Anson H. -P
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Wong, Duo W.-C.
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Zheng, Yong-Ping
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Lee, Winson C.-C.
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    A vibrotactile and plantar force measurement-based biofeedback system: Paving the way towards wearable balance-improving devices2015In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 31709-31722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits. 

  • 3.
    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao
    et al.
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Wong, Duo W.-C.
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Lam, Wing K.
    Li Ning Sports Science Research Center, Beijing, China.
    Wan, Anson H.-P.
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Lee, Winson C.-C.
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Balance improvement effects of biofeedback systems with state-of-the-art wearable sensors: A systematic review2016In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 16, no 4, article id 434Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Falls and fall-induced injuries are major global public health problems. Balance and gait disorders have been the second leading cause of falls. Inertial motion sensors and force sensors have been widely used to monitor both static and dynamic balance performance. Based on the detected performance, instant visual, auditory, electrotactile and vibrotactile biofeedback could be provided to augment the somatosensory input and enhance balance control. This review aims to synthesize the research examining the effect of biofeedback systems, with wearable inertial motion sensors and force sensors, on balance performance. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials were included in this review. All studies were evaluated based on the methodological quality. Sample characteristics, device design and study characteristics were summarized. Most previous studies suggested that biofeedback devices were effective in enhancing static and dynamic balance in healthy young and older adults, and patients with balance and gait disorders. Attention should be paid to the choice of appropriate types of sensors and biofeedback for different intended purposes. Maximizing the computing capacity of the micro-processer, while minimizing the size of the electronic components, appears to be the future direction of optimizing the devices. Wearable balance-improving devices have their potential of serving as balance aids in daily life, which can be used indoors and outdoors. 

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