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  • 1.
    Almusaed, Amjad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Almssad, Asaad
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Engn & Chem Sci, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Yitmen, Ibrahim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Homod, Raad Z. Z.
    Basrah Univ Oil & Gas, Dept Oil & Gas Engn, Basra 61004, Iraq..
    Enhancing Student Engagement: Harnessing "AIED"'s Power in Hybrid Education - A Review Analysis2023In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 632Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid learning is a complex combination of face-to-face and online learning. This model combines the use of multimedia materials with traditional classroom work. Virtual hybrid learning is employed alongside face-to-face methods. That aims to investigate using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to increase student engagement in hybrid learning settings. Educators are confronted with contemporary issues in maintaining their students' interest and motivation as the popularity of online and hybrid education continues to grow, where many educational institutions are adopting this model due to its flexibility, student-teacher engagement, and peer-to-peer interaction. AI will help students communicate, collaborate, and receive real-time feedback, all of which are challenges in education. This article examines the advantages and disadvantages of hybrid education and the optimal approaches for incorporating Artificial Intelligence (AI) in educational settings. The research findings suggest that using AI can revolutionize hybrid education, as it enhances both student and instructor autonomy while fostering a more engaging and interactive learning environment.

  • 2.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    The PRU: The solution for whom?2021In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, pupil referral units (PRUs) have been recommended by the government, suggesting that “inclusion has gone too far”. This governmental recommendation is not based on research focusing on PRUs, as such research is sparse. Furthermore, there has been a lack of evaluations of the efficacy of PRUs, and no national evaluations of such provision have been undertaken. Furthermore, more attention must be paid to PRU students’ own perspectives and experiences as we lack knowledge of their needs and situation. This study aimed to investigate how educational needs have been and should be addressed in one PRU according to nine stakeholder groups, for example, current students, former students, parents, school staff, and various groups of people who, in their work, were responsible for deciding about the PRU (e.g., chief education officers or politicians) or supporting the PRU (e.g., school healthcare unit staff). Comparative analysis of all groups’ perceptions considered similarities and differences of views of this topic. Preliminary results indicate substantial between-and within-group variation concerning the purpose of the PRU and uncertainty about educational quality, partly due to insufficient documentation. Some students described a “Catch-22”: having been told to catch up educationally with peers and that PRU placement would help in this, they were disappointed, as the emphasis on non-educational practices impeded catching up.

  • 3.
    White, Jia
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Sch Educ, Perth, WA 6102, Australia.;Autism CRC, Brisbane, Qld 4068, Australia..
    McGarry, Sarah
    Curtin Univ, Curtin Sch Allied Hlth, Perth, WA 6102, Australia..
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Scott, Melissa
    Curtin Univ, Curtin Sch Allied Hlth, Perth, WA 6102, Australia..
    Williams, P. John
    Curtin Univ, Sch Educ, Perth, WA 6102, Australia..
    Black, Melissa H.
    Curtin Univ, Curtin Sch Allied Hlth, Perth, WA 6102, Australia.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Neurodev Disorders KIND, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, S-17177 Stockholm, Region Stockhol, Sweden..
    Creating Inclusive Schools for Autistic Students: A Scoping Review on Elements Contributing to Strengths-Based Approaches2023In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 709Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strengths-based approaches leveraging the strengths and interests of autistic students are increasingly recognised as important to meeting their school-related needs. A scoping review exploring elements contributing to strengths-based approaches for autistic students in schools was undertaken. Eighteen articles were identified, with results conceptualised according to the Bioecological Model of Development. One personal (strengths and interests), six microsystem (specialised instructions, curriculum integration, curriculum differentiation, common interests with peers, reciprocal roles and adult involvement), three mesosystem (matching resources and activities, real-life learning experiences and benefiting all students), and three exosystem (cost-effective and timesaving, collaboration with colleagues and parents and teachers' attitude and knowledge) elements were identified. Findings highlight the interrelatedness of the elements contributing to strengths-based approaches for autistic students, which can be used to aid in the development of more inclusive school environments.

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