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  • 1.
    Almgren, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Undoing Churnalism? Users sharing local news on Facebook2017In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1060-1079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the types of information that users of a local news site share on Facebook. This issue relates to the idea of "churnalism", which concerns a form of weakened journalism that diminishes the ability to perform expected tasks in a democratic society. As a major social media platform, Facebook has acquired substantial influence over news dissemination, and therefore, scholarly focus needs to be directed to users as news disseminators. The manners by which users share news on Facebook indicate whether churnalism is promoted or abated through users' interaction with online news. In this study, a quantitative content analysis illustrates how 348 news articles published on a local news site were shared 7266 times. The results show that concerns related to churnalism should be directed primarily to the fact that the news outlet only rarely provides users with opportunities to interact with serious or hard news, while lightweight news is frequently offered. Despite this, users abate churnalism in the sense that the news they prefer to share is news from in-house sources rather than from external sources. The news extensively shared covers changes in the vicinity, and health care, and has emerged from local and regional events.

  • 2.
    Gambarato, Renira R.
    Faculty of Communications, Media and Design, Department of Media, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russian Federation.
    The Sochi Project: Slow journalism within the transmedia space2016In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 445-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sochi Project is a distinguished example of slow journalism. The project, a transmedia experience built by Dutch photographer Rob Hornstra and journalist Arnold van Bruggen, depicts the hidden story behind the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. The project involves an interactive documentary, numerous print media extensions, digital publications, and an exhibition. Transmedia storytelling involves the unfolding of a storyworld in which instalments of the narrative are distributed across different media platforms to engage the audience and offer a meaningful experience. The case study paper aims to discuss the premises of slow journalism within the transmedia space as the theoretical background on which the analysis of the project is founded. The transmedia analysis delineates how The Sochi Project is developed and, consequently, how slow journalism can benefit from multiplatform media production. In conclusion, slow journalism is not necessarily attached to traditional media, but the opposite: it is aligned with the new possibilities offered by novel technologies. The relevance of the paper relies on the exemplification of slow journalism within transmedia dynamics.

  • 3.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Reinvented Journalist: The Discursive Construction of Professional Identity on Twitter2017In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 61-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there is much academic discussion about how journalism and journalists are affected by rapid change and convergence in the work context. Considering the fundamental transformations of the media ecology brought about by digitization and the advent of social media, it has been assumed that journalists are more or less compelled to reinvent their professional role and identity. We know a good deal about how social media is adopted by journalists, mostly through survey and interview studies investigating self-perceptions of identity in terms of norms and values. There are also some case studies, predominantly in the form of (quantitative) content analyses, exploring the (innovative) uses of Twitter. However, we still have little knowledge about how the professional identity of journalists is discursively constructed – how, in specific detail, traditional norms and ideals are discursively reinforced or challenged – in the Twitter flow. With a discourse theoretical and methodological approach, this article aims to contribute to our understanding of the discursive construction of professional identity on Twitter by qualitatively analyzing tweets from the most widely followed journalist in Sweden. The analysis of the most active j-tweeter can yield important clues as to what journalism may be in the process of becoming. The article identifies discourses that (1) reinforce the watchdog identity, (2) challenge the watchdog identity, (3) reinforce the disseminator/explicator identity, and (4) reinforce transparency but challenge professional identity. It concludes that the reinvented journalistic identity includes discursive processes that both shape and are shaped by Twitter in a dialectical relationship. 

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