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  • 1.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå Universitet.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Uppsala universitet.
    The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF Study2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, p. 1-7, article id 371905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common heart rhythm disorder. Several life-style factors have been identified as risk factors for AF, but less is known about the impact of work-related stress. This study aims to evaluate the association between work-related stress, defined as job strain, and risk of AF. Methods. Data from the Swedish WOLF study was used, comprising 10,121 working men and women. Job strain was measured by the demand-control model. Information on incident AF was derived from national registers. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between job strain and AF risk. Results. In total, 253 incident AF cases were identified during a total follow-up time of 132,387 person-years. Job strain was associated with AF risk in a time-dependent manner, with stronger association after 10.7 years of follow-up (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.10–3.36 after 10.7 years, versus HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67–1.83 before 10.7 years). The results pointed towards a dose-response relationship when taking accumulated exposure to job strain over time into account. Conclusion. This study provides support to the hypothesis that work-related stress defined as job strain is linked to an increased risk of AF.

  • 2.
    Rundqvist, Louise
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Department of Clinical Physiology, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Emma
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Resting level of insulin-like growth factor 1 is not at play in cardiac enlargement in endurance-trained adolescents2019In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, p. 1-7, article id 9647964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The study aimed to investigate resting levels of several selected growth and metabolic hormones in a group of 24 endurance-trained adolescents (aged 13-19 years) compared with 24 untrained age- and sex-matched controls, and to investigate if increased cardiac dimensions were related to these hormones at rest with emphasis on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).

    Methods. The hormones (cortisol, IGF-1, IGF-2, follicle-stimulating hormone, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone) were analysed with chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) or multiplex fluorochrome (Luminex) technique. Cardiac dimensions were assessed by echocardiographic examination at rest. Peak oxygen uptake was obtained by a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill.

    Results. Circulating levels of analysed hormones at rest did not differ between the groups. A correlation was found between increased cardiac dimensions and IGF-1 in the controls, but not in the active group. This correlation declined also among the controls when the cardiac parameters were indexed for body surface area.

    Conclusion. Increased cardiac dimensions in endurance-trained adolescents could not be related to resting levels of hormones associated with growth and metabolism, including IGF-1 and GH. In addition, the resting levels of these hormones seem not to be affected by intense regular endurance exercise in adolescents. These findings may contribute to the knowledge about cellular signaling that trigger growth as well as cardiac adaptation to endurance training in young athletes. 

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