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  • 1. Carlander, Ida
    et al.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Constructing family identity close to death2013In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 379-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daily life close to death involves physical, psychological, and social strain, exposing patients and their family members to major transitions affecting relational patterns and identity. For the individual family member, this often means sharing life with a changing person in a changing relationship, disrupting both individual identity and family identity. Our aim was to deepen the understanding of individual experiences that are important in constructing family identity close to death at home. We performed a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected through 40 interviews with persons with life-threatening illness and the family members who shared everyday life with them. The analysis resulted in interpretive descriptions which provided three patterns important for creating family identity, which we here call “we-ness” close to death. The patterns were: being an existential person, being an extension of the other, and being together in existential loneliness. Together, these three patterns seemed to play a part in the construction of family identity; we-ness, close to death. One important finding was the tension between the search for togetherness in “we-ness” while dealing with an existential loneliness, which seemed to capture an essential aspect of being a family of which one member is dying.

  • 2.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlman, Gull-Britt
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ekwall, Anna K.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Glasdam, Stinne
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hommel, Ami
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Catharina
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Persson, Eva I.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Rantala, Andreas
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Sjöström-Strand, Annica
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Wihlborg, Jonas
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Essentials of teamcare in randomized controlled trials of multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary interventions in somatic care: A systematic review2015In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1089-1101Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Teamcare should, like all patient care, also contribute to evidence-based practice (EBP). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on teamcare have been performed but no study has addressed its essentials. How far this EBP has progressed in different health aspects is generally established in systematic reviews of RCTs.

    Aim: The aim is to determine the essentials of teamcare including the nurse profession in RCTs of multi- or interdisciplinary interventions in somatic care focusing on the stated context, goals, strategies, content as well as effectiveness of quality of care.

    Methods: A systematic review was performed according to Cochrane review assumptions to identify, appraise and synthesize all empirical evidence meeting pre-specified eligibility criteria. The PRISMA statement guided the data selection process of 27 articles from PubMed and CINAHL.

    Results: Eighty-five percent of RCTs in somatic care showed a positive effectiveness of teamcare interventions, of which interdisciplinary ones showed a greater effectiveness compared with the multidisciplinary approach (100% vs 76%). Also theory-based RCTs presented higher positive effectiveness (85%) compared with non-theory-based RCTs (79%). The RCTs with positive effectiveness showed greater levels for professional-centered ambition in terms of goals and for team-directed initiatives in terms of strategy, and a significantly higher level for patient-team interaction plans in terms of content was shown.

    Conclusions: Teamcare RCTs are still grounded in the multidisciplinary approach having a professional-centered ambition while interdisciplinary approaches especially those that are theory-based appear to be essential with regard to positive effectiveness and preferable when person-centered careis applied.

  • 3.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Baigi, Amir
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University.
    Developing and establishing the psychometric properties of an Ethos towards Wellness Questionnaire (EtWeQ)2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 538-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Validated instruments exist measuring parts of personal health, ill-health and lifestyle, but there are few, if any, instruments “grasping the big picture” of wellness and ethos. Accordingly the aim was to develop and establish the psychometric properties of 74-item Ethos towards Wellness Questionnaire (EtWeQ) with regards to content and construct validity, as well as homogeneity and stability reliability. 

    Methods: A questionnaire based on a methodological and developmental design was sent out twice with a four week gap between, on 221 healthy middle-aged participants in four steps: item generating, content validating, statistical analyzing and establishing the final questionnaire. 

    Results: The substantial base, consisting of content validity resulted in, besides basic characteristics, six well-defined and sufficient indexes comprising of; two health indexes (healthiness and ill-healthiness), three life context indexes (work, family, spare time), and one brief comprehensive index (ethos). The three life context as well as the ethos indexes at an ordinal scale level, identified overall satisfactory communalities of >0.30, factor loadings > 0.30, and factor total variance > 50% with regard to construct validity. The homogeneity reliability, in terms of Cronbach’s alpha coefficient > 0.70, at both occasions with a four week gap between, as well as the stability reliability in terms of intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.70, were also considered satisfactory in the same indexes. 

    Conclusions: This newly developed, and likely the only questionnaire focusing on “grasping the big human picture”, was based on both a philosophical reasoning and empirical recommendations of wellness, is shown to be a valid and reliable measurement in screening or in follow-up of healthy people’s wellness and ethos.

  • 4.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jönsson, A-C
    Andersson, EK
    Bala, S-V
    Dahlman, G-B
    Forsberg, A
    Glasdam, S
    Hommel, A
    Kristensson, A
    Lindberg, C
    Sivberg, B
    Sjöström-Strand, A
    Wihlborg, J
    Samuelson, K
    Essential of nursing care in randomized controlled trials of nurse-led interventions in somatic care: A systematic review2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 181-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing practice has to contribute to evidence pointing out why there is a need for more nurse-designed randomized control trials (RCTs) focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP). How far this EBP has progressed in different health aspects is usually established by systematic reviews of RCTs. Nurse-led RCTs exist but no study has addressed the essentials of nursing care. Aim: The aim was therefore to determine the essentials of nurses’ interventions by means of nurse-led RCTs in somatic care focusing on the stated context, goals, content, strategies as well as the nurse’s role related to effectiveness. Methods: A systematic review was realized according to Cochrane review assumptions to identify, appraise and synthesize all empirical evidence meeting pre-specified eligibility criteria. The PRISMA statement guided the data extraction process (n = 55) from PubMed and CINAHL. Results: Of the RCTs in somatic care, 71% showed a positive effectiveness of nurse-led interventions, of which the nurse had a significant role with regard to being the main responsible in 67% of the studies. Also, 47% of the RCTs presented a theoretical standpoint related to the nurse-led interventions and most prominent were international evidence-based guidelines. Goals were found to have either a patient-centered or a professional-centered ambition. Strategies were based on patient-directed initiatives, nurse-patient-directed initiatives or nurse-directed initiatives, while contents were built upon either a patient-nurse interaction or a nursing management plan. Conclusions: This review underlines the necessity of a holistic view of a person, as nurse-led RCTs comprising a patient-centered ambition, patient-directed initiative and patient-nurse interaction plan showed beneficial nursing care effectiveness, particularly if theory-based. In a nurse-led RCT, a basic theoretical perspective is advantageous as well as to elucidate the role of the nurse in relation to the estimated effects.

  • 5.
    Hove, Randi
    et al.
    Institute of Nursing, Department of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway.
    Fålun, Nina
    Institute of Nursing, Department of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nurses’ experiences of using the Liverpool Care Pathway Plan in hospitalized patients with heart failure in the end-of-life stage: A qualitative content analysis2016In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 591-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The introduction of care pathway plans for end-of-life cares such as the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) reveals a unique possibility for inter professional collaboration. Knowledge of symptom relief and how to meet the patients’ needs at the last stage of the palliative phase are essential for the nurses’ approach and care actions, but the documentation of such implementations is still rare and sometimes criticized.

    Aim: To explore and describe nurses’ experiences of using the LCP plan with patients hospitalized with heart failure at the end-of-life stage. An explorative design was applied, using qualitative content analysis of 20 interviews with nurses practicing the LCP plan in two district hospitals in Norway.

    Results: The nurses found the LCP plan as quality assurance for treatment and care in patients with heart failure in the last hours and days of life. The use of the LCP plan implied: 1) individualized adjustment, 2) symptom relief and 3) a holistic approach.

    Conclusion: Nurses experienced that using the LCP plan as a comprehensive action plan contributed in the decision making process and improved inter professional communication. Using the LCP plan should be seen as a tool to practice individualized and holistic nursing to patients at the end-of-life and their families, as well as a purposeful relief of symptoms associated with heart failure.

  • 6.
    Malm, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Futurum Academy for Healthcare, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ebefors, Eva-Marie
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Conlon, Lisa
    Futurum Academy for Healthcare, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Reducing the prevalence of catheter-related infections by quality improvement: Six-year follow-up study2016In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Peripheral venous catheter (PVC) insertion is a crucial nursing action during life support. Several factors that increase the risk of thrombophlebitis associated with PVCs have been reported. Objective: We wish to evaluate the impact of a quality improvement regarding PVC treatment for patients with coronary heart diseases.

    Method: A longitudinal, quantitative observational study was carried out in 2008 and 2013 in a hospital in southern Sweden with 360 consecutive patients suffering from acute chest pain. New routines for PVC treatment were included in the hospital with daily inspection according to a checklist. A structured observation protocol was used to survey the prevalence of thrombophlebitis between 2008 and 2013. Also, we examined the relationship between the location and luminal diameters of PVCs.

    Results: The student’s t-test showed significant differences between 2008 and 2013 with respect to luminal diameter of PVCs (p = 0.002), prevalence of thrombophlebitis (p = 0.003) and number of days with PVC left in situ (p < 0.001).

    Conclusion: These findings emphasize the value of using systematic daily inspections and checklists to achieve quality and safety in patients with acute chest pain having PVC-based treatment.

  • 7.
    Malm, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Regaining normalcy in relatives of patients with a pacemaker2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 139-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic diseases, such as those with pacemakers, have shown that they have a worsened well-being, which means an increased interest in investigating how relatives of patients with pacemakers experience their situations and how the disease affects their life situations. The aim of this study was to explore the main concerns for the relatives of patients with a pacemaker and how they resolve these issues. A classic grounded theory was used throughout the study for data collection and analysis. Interviews were conducted with ten participants. Striving for normalcy emerged as the main concern for relatives of patients with a pacemaker and was handled through a process of regaining normalcy where the relatives strive to find a way to live as normal as possible. Regaining normalcy is done through developing trust, dwindling and finally life stabilizing, in which they are either holding back or new normalizing. Distinguishing signs are constantly done during the process to quickly notice possible symptoms of the patient. Increased knowledge and understanding of how the relatives of patients with a pacemaker regain normalcy can be used as a guide in order to support and inform the patient as well as their relatives in conjunction with implantation occasions but also in connection with recurring and lifelong follow-up occasions.

  • 8.
    Strid, Camilla
    et al.
    Höglandssjukhuset.
    Lingfors, Hans
    Health Centre of Habo.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Lifestyle changes in coronary heart disease - Effects of cardiac rehabilitation programs with focus on intensity, duration and content: A systematic review2012In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 420-430Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death worldwide the literature shows a wide variation in the arrangement of cardiac rehabilitation and achieved lifestyle changes. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of intensity (number of patient follow-ups), duration (length of intervention) and content in cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRP) regarding lifestyle changes in patients with CHD. Method: A systematic literature review of articles published in the databases PubMed and CINAHL between 1990 and 2007 was conducted. This resulted in 1120 hits of which 25 articles finally met the set criteria for inclusion. Results: The majority of significant positive results on lifestyle factors were shown among the studies describing high intensity and long duration. Included studies showed a wide variation in content, but four different interventions (informative content, educational content, practical content, behavioral and self care-oriented content) emerged. The group of studies which contained all four interventions focused on most lifestyle factors and achieved the most significant positive results. Conclusion: This systematic literature review shows that CRP should include high intensity, long duration and an intervention content covering information, knowledge, practical training, self care-activity and behavior changes in order to achieve effect on all four lifestyle factors of diet, physical activity and exercise, smoking and stress. Lifestyle changes can be reached in less lifestyle factors, with a longer duration and a variation of intensity of contacts but in combining with an informative and educational content with an additional content of a practical nature or self activity.

  • 9.
    Wieslander, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Svedberg, Petra
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Factors influencing female patients' recovery after their first myocardial infarction as experienced by cardiac rehabilitation nurses2013In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 230-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the developed part of the world, coronary heart disease is the major cause of death and is one of the leading causes of disease burden. In Sweden, more than 30,000 people per year are affected by myocardial infarction and out of these approximately 40% are women. Nearly 70% of the women survive and after a myocardial infarction a recovery process follows. Today’s health care focuses more on treatment, symptoms and risk factors than on the individuals’ perceptions of the recovery process. Aim: To explore cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first myocardial infarction. Methods: Twenty cardiac rehabilitation nurses were interviewed. The study was conducted using qualitative content analysis. Results: The cardiac rehabilitation nurses experienced that women’s recovery after a first myocardial infarction was influenced whether they had a supportive context, their ability to cope with the stresses of life, if they wanted to be involved in their own personal care and how they related to themselves. Conclusions: Women’s recovery after a myocardial infarction was influenced by factors related to surroundings as well as own individual factors. The underlying meaning of women’s recovery can be described as the transition process of a recovery to health. Our findings suggest that a focus on person-centered nursing would be beneficial in order to promote the every woman’s personal and unique recovery after a myocardial infarction. Finally, the cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing male patients’ recovery after their first myocardial infarction should be important to investigate.

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