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  • 1.
    Andersson, D. E.
    et al.
    College of Management, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Sustainability and the built environment: The role of durability2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 18, article id 4926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sustainable city combines stable long-term economic growth with a resilient ecological system. It is also a region of social sustainability with low levels of spatial segregation of different socio-economic groups. Spatial inclusion primarily involves provision of equalized city-wide access to territorial public goods. High durability of physical networks and buildings facilitates economic, environmental and social sustainability. This study shows that durability varies considerably between Asian, European and North American cities, with mean life expectancies of buildings that range from below 20 years in Chinese cities to over 100 years in European cities such as Paris. Urban planning principles that focus on the slow and steady expansion of accessibility and density within a durable built environment are consistent with general economic equilibria, while avoiding the pitfalls of political planning of the markets for private goods.

  • 2.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Miljö, MILJÖ.
    New Framework of Sustainable Indicators for Outdoor LED (Light Emitting Diodes) Lighting and SSL (Solid State Lighting)2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1028-1063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) and SSL (solid state lighting) are relatively  new light sources, but are already widely applied for outdoor lighting. Despite this, there is little available information allowing planners and designers to evaluate and weigh different sustainability aspects of LED/SSL lighting when making decisions. Based on a literature review, this paper proposes a framework of sustainability indicators and/or measures that can be used for a general evaluation or to highlight certain objectives or aspects of special interest when choosing LED/SSL lighting. LED/SSL lighting is reviewed from a conventional sustainable development perspective, i.e., covering the three dimensions, including ecological, economic and social sustainability. The new framework of sustainable indicators allow prioritization when choosing LED/SSL products and can thereby help ensure that short-term decisions on LED/SSL lighting systems are in line with long-term sustainability goals established in society. The new framework can also be a beneficial tool for planners, decision-makers, developers and lighting designers, or for consumers wishing to use LED/SSL lighting in  a sustainable manner. Moreover, since some aspects of LED/SSL lighting have not yet been thoroughly studied or developed, some possible future indicators are suggested.

  • 3.
    Kotilainen, Kirsi
    et al.
    Faculty of Business and Built Environment, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Faculty of Business and Built Environment, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Policy influence on consumers' evolution into prosumers-empirical findings from an exploratory survey in Europe2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy sector is in transition to a flexible and sustainable energy system based on renewable energy sources. This complex transition is affecting multiple levels in the sociotechnical system. One driver of the transition is climate change that enforces the policy push from the macro level to change the way energy is produced, delivered, and used. As part of the energy system evolution, the role of the end user in the energy sector is undergoing profound changes, and consumers are increasingly being empowered to participate actively in the production and use of energy. This article investigates how policies might affect consumers' interests in becoming prosumers of energy. We explore consumers' attitudes toward using renewable energy technologies (RET) by means of an empirical consumer survey that was conducted in five European countries. The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method was utilized to analyze the survey results. Our findings suggest that both economic and non-economic policies affect consumer attitudes toward using renewable energy technologies. We conclude that policies have different effects on consumers and prosumers, who have already made the decision to adopt renewable energy solutions. Based on the findings, we propose a set of policy and managerial implications. 

  • 4.
    Mourad, Khaldoon A.
    et al.
    Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Faculty of Social Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Faculty of Social Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The sustainability of post-conflict development: The case of Algeria2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 3036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Algerian civil war, 1992-2002, affected all aspects of life in the country. Major development efforts were therefore initiated in the post-conflict era. Almost 20 years later, the economy remains fragile, and the country's large hydrocarbon revenues have not been used to develop the infrastructure for sustainability, support energy transition or reduce structural vulnerabilities. This paper provides an overview of Algerian development strategies before and after the conflict, examining in particular the orientation of major development projects involving foreign financing. Two rural development programmes are described to illustrate the outcomes of such projects. The results show that the conflict stopped or hindered many ongoing and planned development projects in the country, especially in the agriculture sector, while new investments in industry started after the conflict. The review of individual development projects further revealed that many projects between 1980-2017 had doubtful benefits with respect to long-term development goals. Initiatives tended to be discontinued once the funding period closed, and the involvement of the private sector was low. It is therefore concluded that additional attention needs to be devoted to long-term and structural impacts of development projects, including considerations regarding sustainability, demographics, and climate-related future changes. 

  • 5.
    Månsson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    Kibria, B. M. Golam
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Florida International University, Miami, USA.
    Shukur, Ghazi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics. Department of Economics and Statistics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Pär
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    On the Estimation of the CO2 Emission, Economic Growth and Energy Consumption Nexus Using Dynamic OLS in the Presence of Multicollinearity2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 1315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces shrinkage estimators (Ridge DOLS) for the dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) cointegration estimator, which extends the model for use in the presence of multicollinearity between the explanatory variables in the cointegration vector. Both analytically and by using simulation techniques, we conclude that our new Ridge DOLS approach exhibits lower mean square errors (MSE) than the traditional DOLS method. Therefore, based on the MSE performance criteria, our Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that our new method outperforms the DOLS under empirically relevant magnitudes of multicollinearity. Moreover, we show the advantages of this new method by more accurately estimating the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC), where the income and squared income are related to carbon dioxide emissions. Furthermore, we also illustrate the practical use of the method when augmenting the EKC curve with energy consumption. In summary, regardless of whether we use analytical, simulation-based, or empirical approaches, we can consistently conclude that it is possible to estimate these types of relationships in a considerably more accurate manner using our newly suggested method.

  • 6.
    Oftedal, Elin Merethe
    et al.
    School of Business and Economics, UiT–The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Foss, Lene
    School of Business and Economics, UiT–The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Iakovleva, Tatiana
    Stavanger Business School, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Responsible for responsibility? A study of digital e-health startups2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 19, article id 5433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responsible innovation (RI) has received increased attention from policymakers and academics as a solution to grand challenges and is viewed as the main driver for innovation. The United Nations has suggested 17 Sustainable Development Goals and responsible innovation can be seen as a tool that allows the movement of society towards reducing inequality, coping with environmental challenges and sustaining countries’ economic and societal development. Our knowledge of how businesses act responsibly in solving these challenges is scarce. An inductive analysis of 14 e-health startups in Norway, shows that responsibility is highly prevalent. Entrepreneurs have instant contact with users (patients or healthcare professionals), which increases inclusiveness, anticipation and reflection as the main elements of responsibility. However, firms' contextual and strategic awareness of responsibility remains low, which means an absence of focused strategies to exercise responsibility. Consequently, entrepreneurial startups are prevented from reaching broader stakeholders and fully reflecting the knowledge obtained. Moreover, RI activities are often bundled with other activities on the "path" to successful commercialization. This paper contributes to and enriches the current RI understanding from a firm perspective and suggests some implications for practitioners as well as policymakers to enhance sustainable development in the healthcare sector.

  • 7.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Department of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Department of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Eco-friendly brands to drive sustainable development: Replication and extension of the brand experience scale in a cross-national context2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 7, article id 1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore how consumers perceive eco-friendliness in their brand experiences and how this can be measured cross-nationally. This is a replication-extension study based on an existing brand experience scale. Data were collected in India and Finland from smartphone users (N = 1008). The fitness of the brand experience model is validated cross-nationally with structural equation modeling. The empirical data consisting of consumers' responses on the Apple, Samsung, and Nokia brands confirm that there is a unique dimension of eco-friendliness in the general brand experiences of consumers, and it is generalizable cross-nationally in India and Finland. The study presents a consumer-focused measure of sustainable development that could be used to track how consumers perceive the eco-friendliness of brands. The paper links consumer experiences that guide sustainable consumption behavior to the macro-level management of sustainable development. This paper extends previous research on brand experience measurement by testing cross-nationally a scale including a dimension for measuring eco-friendliness. The brand experience measurement scale could aid companies in tracking the success of their sustainable development initiatives on the brand level.

  • 8.
    Siva, Vanajah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Division of Service Management and Logistics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Halldórsson, Árni
    Division of Service Management and Logistics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Organising sustainability competencies through quality management: Integration or specialisation2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant step in integrating environmental sustainability into daily operations is through product development. One way to achieve such integration of environmental considerations into product development is by relating sustainability competencies to practices of Quality Management. However, practices seem to vary for how competencies within environmental sustainability are organised in order to make sustainability more actionable. This study explores two ways of organising sustainability competencies in product development: integration and specialisation. The organisation of sustainability competency is illustrated through two cases; one case in which sustainability is integrated with the quality management competency, and the other in which a new competency focusing on sustainability has been added as a separate function in product development. It is suggested that the organisation of sustainability competency influences the extent of environmental impact. Further, trade-offs, such as material source versus weight may not be exploited when sustainability is integrated as one area of responsibility for another specialty competency, suggesting a lack of sufficient competency within environmental sustainability to recognise potential trade-offs between-for example-quality and environmental impact. 

  • 9.
    Vieira, Fátima L.
    et al.
    Human Technology Group, Department of Electromechanical Engineering and Centre for Mechanical and Aerospace Science and Technology, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Vieira, Paulo A.
    Department of Computer Science and Cloud Computing Competence Centre, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Coelho, Denis A.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Human Technology Group, Department of Electromechanical Engineering and Centre for Mechanical and Aerospace Science and Technology, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    A data-driven approach to development of a taxonomy framework for triple bottom line metrics2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 2717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a data-driven approach to develop a taxonomy in a data structure on list for triple bottom line (TBL) metrics. The approach is built from the authors reflection on the subject and review of the literature about TBL. The envisaged taxonomy framework grid to be developed through this approach will enable existing metrics to be classified, grouped, and standardized, as well as detect the need for further metrics development in uncovered domains and applications. The approach reported aims at developing a taxonomy structure that can be seen as a bi-dimensional table focusing on feature interrogations and characterizing answers, which will be the basis on which the taxonomy can then be developed. The interrogations column is designed as the stack of the TBL metrics features: What type of metric is it (qualitative, quantitative, or hybrid)? What is the level of complexity of the problems where it is used? What standards does it follow? How is the measurement made, and what are the techniques that it uses? In what kinds of problems, subjects, and domains is the metric used? How is the metric validated? What is the method used in its calculation? The column of characterizing answers results from a categorization of the range of types of answers to the feature interrogations. The approach reported in this paper is based on a screening tool that searches and analyzes information both within abstracts and full-text journal papers. The vision for this future taxonomy is that it will enable locating for any specific context, discern what TBL metrics are used in that context or similar contexts, or whether there is a lack of developed metrics. This meta knowledge will enable a conscious decision to be made between creating a new metric or using one of those that already exists. In this latter case, it would also make it possible to choose, among several metrics, the one that is most appropriate to the context at hand. In addition, this future framework will ease new future literature revisions, when these are viewed as updates of this envisaged taxonomy. This would allow creating a dynamic taxonomy for TBL metrics. This paper presents a computational approach to develop such taxonomy, and reports on the initial steps taken in that direction, by creating a taxonomy framework grid with a computational approach. 

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