Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    “Striving for a Good Life”: The Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis as Experienced by Patients2011In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 5, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To generate a theoretical model how patients experience their management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in everyday life.Method: An explorative design with the grounded theory approach was used by interviewing 16 informants with RA.Results: The generated theoretical model emerged in a core category- Striving for a good life with two categories; making use of personal resources and grasping for support from others, which formed the base of managing RA. When relating these categories together, four dimensions emerged which characterised patients’ different ways of managing RA: mastering, relying, struggling and being resigned.Discussion: The management of RA incorporated the use of personal resources and the grasping for support from others. Both self-management strategies and patients’ need of support were highlighted as aspects that were of importance when managing RA. Patients’ experiences of their need of support to manage RA give extended knowledge that is of importance for nurses and other healthcare providers. The relationship between patients and healthcare providers is always the key to a good encounter. Interventions to increase self-management in RA have to incorporate this knowledge when trying to increase patients’ self-efficacy and with their experience of support

  • 2.
    Ekblad, Helena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Conlon, Lisa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Rönning, Helén
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    The well-being of relatives of patients with atrial fibrillation: a critical incident technique analysis2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The well-being of relatives of patients having chronic heart diseases (CHD) has been found to be negatively affected by the patient's condition. Studies examining relatives of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) indicate that their well-being may be affected in a similar manner, but further research is needed.

    AIM: To explore and describe critical incidents in which relatives of patients experience how AF affects their well-being and what actions they take to handle these situations.

    DESIGN AND METHOD: An explorative, descriptive design based on the critical incident technique (CIT) was used. Interviews were conducted with 19 relatives (14 women and five men) of patients hospitalised in southern Sweden due to acute symptoms of the AF.

    RESULTS: The well-being of relatives was found to be affected by their worries (patient-related health), as well as the sacri-ficing of their own needs (self-related health). In handling their own well-being, these relatives adjusted to and supported the patient (practical involvement), along with adjusting their own feelings and responding to the mood of the patients (emotional involvement).

    CONCLUSION: The well-being of relatives of patients with AF was affected depending on the patients' well-being. In their attempt to handle their own well-being, the relatives adjusted to and supported the patients. Further research is needed in order to evaluate the effects of support to relatives and patients respectively and together.

  • 3.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Ersta University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Seiger-Cronfalk, Berit
    Ersta University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stord Haugesund University College, Norway.
    Henriksen, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholms Sjukhem foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Ersta University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Karlsson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Institutionen för vård och natur, Högskolan i Skövde.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Registered nurses' view of pain assessment among persons with dementia as consultant advisors2012In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, no 6, p. 62-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain assessment in persons with dementia is well known as a challenging issue to professionalcaregivers, because of these patients´ difficulties in verbalising pain problems. Within municipal dementia care inSweden, pain assessment has become problematic for registered nurses, as they have entered a new role in their nursingprofession, from being clinical practitioners to becoming consultant advisers to other health care staff.

    Aim: To present municipal registered nurses´ view of pain assessment in personswith dementia in relation to their nursingprofession as consultant advisers.

    Methods: Purposive sampling was undertaken with 11 nurses invited to participate. Data were collected by focus groups.Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Findings: Four categories were identified to describe registered nurses´ view of pain assessment: estrangement frompractical nursing care, time consuming and unsafe pain documentation, unfulfilled needs of reflection possibilities, andcollaboration and coordination.

    Conclusions: The performance of pain assessment through a consultant advising function is experienced as frustrating andas an uncomfortable nursing situation. The nurses feel resistance to providing nursing in this way. They view nursing as aclinical task demanding daily presence among patients to enable them to make accurate and safe assessments. However,due to the consultative model, setting aside enough time for the presence seems difficult to accomplish. It is necessary topromote the quality of systematic routines in pain assessment and reflection, as well as developing professionalknowledge of how pain can be expressed by dementia patients, especially those with communication difficulties.

  • 5. Karlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Hedman, Karl
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Views on patient safety by operations managers in somatic hospital care: a qualitative analysis2011In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare outcome is to achieve optimal health for each patient. It is a well-known phenomenon that patients suffer from care injuries. Operations managers have difficulties in seeing that the relationship between safety culture, values and attitudes affects the medical care to the detriment of the patient. The aim was to describe the views on patient safety by operations managers and the establishment of patient safety and safety culture in somatic hospital care. Four open questions were answered by 29 operations managers in somatic hospital care. Data analysis was carried out by deductive qualitative content analysis. Operations managers found production to be the most important goal, and patient safety was linked to this basic mission. Safety work meant to achieve optimal health outcomes for each patient in a continuous development of operations. This was accomplished by pursuing a high level of competence among employees, having a functioning report system and preventing medical errors. Safety culture was mentioned to a smaller extent. The primary target of patient safety work by the operations managers was improving care quality which resulted in fewer complications and shorter care time. A change in emphasis to primary safety work is necessary. To accomplish this increased knowledge of communication, teamwork and clinical decision making are required.

  • 6.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, Östersund, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Bräcke Diakoni Foundation, Research Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden / Karolinska Institutet, Institution of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Living in the Presence of Death: An Integrative Literature Review of Relatives' Important Existential Concerns when Caring for a Severely Ill Family Member2012In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 6, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore relatives’ existential concerns when caring for a seriously ill family member as well as to describe interventions that meet these concerns.

    Methods: In this integrative literature review we assessed and classified 17 papers, 12 qualitative and 5 quantitative. Literature was sought in the databases Cinahl, PubMed, Psykinfo and Web of Science in September 2009 and in March 2010. Search terms used in different combinations were: family, family caregiver, next of kin, relatives, palliative, palliative care, end-of-life care, existential, spirit*. Data were redrawn from the papers results/findings, and synthesized into a new descriptive content.

    Results: The results were categorized from 13 papers exploring relatives’ important existential concerns and 4 papers describing interventions aimed to support them in the existential area. A majority of the reviewed papers had been written in Sweden and concerned relatives of patients with cancer. One overarching theme, living in the presence of death, and three categories: responses to life close to death; support when death is near; and beyond the presence of death were created.

    Conclusion: There is an urgent demand for large-scale studies using accurate methodology, as well as a need to design qualified investigations regarding the effects of various interventions, and to determine which interventions are the most effective in supporting relatives who experience existential distress manifested physically and/or psychologically. There is also a considerable demand for educational interventions among professionals in various healthcare settings to increase their knowledge regarding existential concerns among relatives.

  • 7.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Batalden, Paul B.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Dartmouth Institute, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, USA.
    Fritzell, Peter
    Futurum Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Borst, Sanna
    Department of Radiology at the Region County of Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Exploring the meaning of coproduction as described by patients after spinal surgery interventions2019In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 13, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    In the procedures of surgical pathways it is important to create opportunities for developing active forms of engagement and extending the patients’ health maintenance knowledge, which is essential in nursing. One way is to understand more about the concept of coproduction.

    Objective:

    The purpose was to use experiences from spinal surgery patients’ narratives to explore the conceptual model of healthcare service coproduction.

    Method:

    A prospective qualitative explorative approach was performed and analyzed in two phases with inductive and deductive content analysis of data retrieved from five focus group interviews of 25 patients with experiences from spinal surgery interventions.

    Result:

    The findings indicate that mutual trust and respect, as well as guidance given in dialogue, are two important domains. An illustration of how to apply the conceptual model of healthcare service coproduction was revealed in the descriptions of the three core concepts co-planning, co-execution and civil discourse.

    Conclusion:

    This study highlights what is needed to reach coproduction in healthcare services concerning patients with spinal disorders. Development of care plans that focuses on co-planning and co-execution is recommended which are structured and customizable for each patient situation to make coproduction to occur.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf