Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tingström, Pia
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-232012In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Empowerment is a central concept in both rheumatology and diabetes care. A Swedish empowerment instrument for patients with rheumatic diseases has not been created before now. The aim of the present study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-23, such as construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-item correlations and discriminant validity.

    METHODS: The already existing instrument, the Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale (SWE-DES-23), was adapted for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The adapted instrument was called the SWE-RES-23. In 2009, 260 patients with rheumatic diseases from a rheumatology unit in Sweden completed the instrument. Construct validity was tested by using exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency reliability was tested by the use of Cronbach's α-coefficient. In order to determine unidimensionality of the empowerment subscales, inter-item correlations were calculated. To establish discriminant validity, an item about self-perceived health from the Short Form (SF) 36 was used in addition to the SWE-RES-23.

    RESULTS: The exploratory factor analysis resulted in five factors (empowerment subscales) with eigenvalues >1, explaining 64.1% of the total variance: Goal achievement and overcoming barriers to goal achievement; Self-knowledge; Managing stress; Assessing dissatisfaction and readiness to change; and Support for caring. Cronbach's α values ranged from 0.59 to 0.91, and the value for the total score was 0.92.

    CONCLUSION: The results support the possibility of adapting the SWE-DES-23 for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The SWE-RES-23 shows acceptable psychometric properties, in terms of construct validity and internal consistency reliability. To validate the SWE-RES-23 fully, further studies are needed, with a focus on test-retest correlations.

  • 2.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Forslind, Kristina
    Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health & Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring person-centred care in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics2018In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 296-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Measurement of person-centred care (PCC) outcomes is underdeveloped owing to the complexity of the concept and lack of conceptual clarity. A framework conceptualizing outpatient PCC in rheumatology nurse-led clinics has therefore been suggested and operationalized into the PCC instrument for outpatient care in rheumatology (PCCoc/rheum).

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the extent to which the PCCoc/rheum represents the underpinning conceptual outpatient PCC framework, and to assess its measurement properties as applied in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics.

    Methods: The 24-item PCCoc/rheum was administered to 343 persons with rheumatoid arthritis from six nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics. Its measurement properties were tested by Rasch measurement theory.

    Results: Ninety-two per cent of individuals (n = 316) answered the PCCoc/rheum. Items successfully operationalized a quantitative continuum from lower to higher degrees of perceived PCC. Model fit was generally good, including lack of differential item functioning (DIF), and the PCCoc/rheum was able to separate individuals with a reliability of 0.88. The four response categories worked as intended, with the exception of one item. Item ordering provided general empirical support of a priori expectations, with the exception of three items that were omitted owing to multidimensionality, dysfunctional response categories and unexpected ordering. The 21-item PCCoc/rheum showed good accordance with the conceptual framework, improved fit, functioning response categories and no DIF, and its reliability was 0.86.

    Conclusion: We found general support for the appropriateness of the PCCoc/rheum as an outcome measure of patient-perceived PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics. While in need of further testing, the 21-item PCCoc/rheum has the potential to evaluate outpatient PCC from a patient perspective.

  • 3.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Forslind, Kristina
    Department of Clinical Science, Section of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Department of Clinical Science, Section of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health & Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Person-centred care in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics: Conceptualization and initial development of a measurement instrument2018In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Person-centred care (PCC) is considered a key component of effective illness management and high-quality care. However, the PCC concept is underdeveloped in outpatient care. In rheumatology, PCC is considered an unmet need and its further development and evaluation is of high priority. The aim of the present study was to conceptualize and operationalize PCC, in order to develop an instrument for measuring patient-perceived PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics.

    METHODS: A conceptual outpatient PCC framework was developed, based on the experiences of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), person-centredness principles and existing PCC frameworks. The resulting framework was operationalized into the PCC instrument for outpatient care in rheumatology (PCCoc/rheum), which was tested for acceptability and content validity among 50 individuals with RA attending a nurse-led outpatient clinic.

    RESULTS: The conceptual framework focuses on the meeting between the person with RA and the nurse, and comprises five interrelated domains: social environment, personalization, shared decision-making, empowerment and communication. Operationalization of the domains into a pool of items generated a preliminary PCCoc/rheum version, which was completed in a mean (standard deviation) of 5.3 (2.5) min. Respondents found items easy to understand (77%) and relevant (93%). The Content Validity Index of the PCCoc/rheum was 0.94 (item level range, 0.87-1.0). About 80% of respondents considered some items redundant. Based on these results, the PCCoc/rheum was revised into a 24-item questionnaire.

    CONCLUSIONS: A conceptual outpatient PCC framework and a 24-item questionnaire intended to measure PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics were developed. The extent to which the questionnaire represents a measurement instrument remains to be tested.

  • 4.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Section of Rheumatology at the Institution of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hesselgård, Karin
    Corporate office, Skåne Regional Council, Malmö, Sweden.
    The experience of care at nurse-led rheumatology clinics2012In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 202-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe how people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience the care provided by Swedish nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics.

    METHODS: Eighteen adult people with a diagnosis of RA who had had at least three documented contact sessions with a nurse-led clinic were interviewed. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Care was expressed in three categories: social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures. A social environment including a warm encounter, a familial atmosphere and pleasant premises was desired and contributed to a positive experience of care. The nurses' professional approach was experienced as empathy, knowledge and skill, as well as support. The care was described as person centred and competent, as it was based on the individual's unique experience of his/her disease and needs. The nurses' specialist knowledge of rheumatology and rheumatology care was highly valued. The offered care represented added value for the participants, instilling security, trust, hope and confidence. It was perceived as facilitating daily life and creating positive emotions. The nurse-led clinics were reported to be easily accessible and provided continuity of the care. These features were presented as fundamental guarantees for health care safety.

    CONCLUSION: The experiences emphasized the need for a holistic approach to care. In this process, the organization of care and the role and skills of the nurse should be focused on the individual's needs and perspectives. The social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures are particularly relevant for optimal care at nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics.

  • 5.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Berglund, Anita
    Petersson, Ingemar F
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Patients' conceptions of the cause of their rheumatoid arthritis: A qualitative study2009In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 243-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients' perspective of the causes and consequences of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can conflict with that of healthcare professionals and lead to misunderstanding, difficulties in management and a poorer outcome. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the variation in how patients' conceive the cause of their RA.Methods: An open written question from the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, aimed at patients recently diagnosed with RA, was answered by 38 strategically selected patients during 2003 and analysed using the phenomenographic approach.Results: Two descriptive categories and six concepts emerged: the category 'consequences beyond personal control' comprised not having a clue, being exposed to climatic change, being genetically exposed and unexpected effects of events; the category 'overloaded circumstances' involved work and family-related strain. Consequences beyond personal control implied that the patients could not prevent the disease and expressed their lack of understanding as to why they contracted it. Overloaded circumstances were described as strained situations that were both work and family related and could be influenced by the patient.Conclusions: The patient's perspective of the cause of their RA includes aspects that complement the current pathogenetic models and should therefore be considered in the management of the disease. When dealing with rheumatic diseases, it is necessary to be aware of the patient's perspectives in order to new management strategies. In addition to epidemiological studies, further studies of patients' own experience are needed in order to achieve a more tailored care model.

  • 6.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Björk, M.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Håkansson, C.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Occupational balance and its association with life satisfaction in men and women with rheumatoid arthritis2020In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Despite improved treatments and reduced disability, people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience difficulties in daily life, which may negatively affect their balance of everyday life activities (occupational balance). The aim of this study was to describe occupational balance and its association with self-rated life satisfaction in men and women with RA.

    Methods:

    A survey, including demographic and health-related questions, was sent to 1,277 people who met the following criteria: with RA >4 years, aged 18–80 years, included in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (SRQ), and had at least one registered visit to the participating rheumatology units in the year before inclusion. The 682 who answered all items in the Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ) were included in the study. Their answers were analysed with descriptive statistics, and logistic regression analyses were conducted on men and women separately.

    Results:

    Significantly higher occupational balance was identified in those participants who were >65 years, had no children at home, had a lower disease activity score, were not continuously stressed and reported low pain intensity. The results of the logistic regression analyses of both genders showed that higher occupational balance was significantly associated with a higher probability for rating themselves as being satisfied with life as a whole.

    Conclusion:

    Occupational balance was identified as related to satisfaction with life as a whole, which is valuable information for health professionals. Enhanced occupational balance may be achieved in people with RA by working towards reducing their stress and pain.

  • 7.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation Center, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Department of Rehabilitation and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Department of Rehabilitation and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lived experiences of sex life difficulties in men and women with early RA – The Swedish TIRA Project2015In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 248-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Men and women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience restrictions in everyday life, in spite of the development of new medications. Recent research has described in detail how participation limitations are experienced in everyday life from a patient perspective. However, knowledge of how sex and intimate relationships are affected is still scarce.

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to explore sex life experiences in relation to sexual function and sexual relationships in men and women with early RA.

    Methods: The study formed part of TIRA-2 (the Swedish acronym for the prospective multicentre early arthritis project). The data collection included 45 interviews with 21 men and 24 women, aged 20–63, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The critical incident technique was used to collect data, and content analysis to categorize the results.

    Results: Half the participants stated that RA affected their sex life. The general descriptions formed five categories: sex life and tiredness; sex life and ageing; emotional consequences of impaired sexual function; facilitators of sexual function and sexual relationships; and strain on the sexual relationship.

    Conclusions: Sex life is affected in early RA, in spite of new effective treatment strategies. New strategies of communication, assessment and self-managing interventions concerning the sex lives of patients with RA need to be implemented by a multidisciplinary healthcare team.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf