Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abellan, Antonio
    et al.
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Perez, Julio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Pujol, Rogelio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Partner care, gender equality, and ageing in Spain and Sweden2017In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 69-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used national surveys to study how older persons’ changing household patterns influence the gender balance of caregiving in two countries with distinct household structures and cultures, Spain and Sweden. In both countries, men and women provide care equally often for their partner in couple-only households. This has become the most common household type among older persons in Spain and prevails altogether in Sweden. This challenges the traditional dominance of young or middle-aged women as primary caregivers in Spain. In Sweden, many caregivers are old themselves. We focus attention to partners as caregivers and the consequences of changing household structures for caregiving, which may be on the way to gender equality in both countries, with implications for families and for the public services.

  • 2.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Sjölander, Per
    Akademi Norr, Storuman, Sweden.
    The level of development of nursing assistants' value system predicts their views on paternalistic care and personal autonomy2014In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 35-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality of care is substantially influenced by the staff‘s value priorities. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize value systems among nursing assistants and nurses’ aides, and to assess relations between their value systems and views on good care. A cross-sectional, quantitative study in a Swedish municipality was performed (N226). Three distinct value systems were identified, and they corresponded to early (n121), middle (n88), and late (n17) conventional stages ofego development. Early conventional value systems emphasized strict rules, routines and working conditions of staff, while middle and, in particularly, late conventional value systems stressed individualization and autonomy of older people. Assessment of value system, socio-demographic, and occupational variables showed that the value systems had a stronger predictive impact on views on care ethics, participation, and autonomy. The results indicate that staff with late conventional value systems prioritized older persons’ exercise of autonomy, while paternalism held priority in staff with early conventional value systems.

  • 3.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Abellán, Antonio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Ayala, Alba
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Pérez, Julio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Pujol, Rogelio
    Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Madrid, Spain.
    Souto, Javier
    Unión Democrática de Pensionistas, Madrid, Spain.
    Men and older persons also care, but how much? Assessing amounts of caregiving in Spain and Sweden2018In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 75-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate how much caregiving men and women respectively do, and how much of the caregiving is done by older (65+) and younger persons, inside their household and for other households, in Spain and in Sweden. To assess this, we use self-reported hours of caregiving from two national surveys about caregiving, performed in 2014 (Spain, N = 2003; Sweden, N = 1193). Spain and Sweden have dissimilar household structures, and different social services for older (65+) persons. Caregivers, on average, provide many more hours of care in Spain than in Sweden. Women provide about 58% of all hours of caregiving, in Spain in all age groups, in Sweden only among younger caregivers. The reason is the dominance of partner caregivers among older Swedes, with older men and women providing equal hours of care. Family caregiving inside the household is more extensive in the more complex Spanish households than in Swedish households. Family care between households prevails in Sweden, where the large majority of older persons live with a partner only, or alone. This is increasingly common in Spain, although it remains at a lower level. We estimate that older persons provide between 22% and 33% of all hours of caregiving in Spain, and between 41% and 49% in Sweden. Patterns of caregiving appear to be determined mainly by demography and household structure.

  • 4.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Tortosa, Maria Ángeles
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Vern L. Bengtson, with Norella M. Putney and Susan Harris (2015). Families and Faith: How Religion Is Passed Down across Generations. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 267 pp. ISBN 978 0199 9486 59 (hardcover)2016In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 95-98Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Wilinska, Monika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Jaco Hoffman and Katrien Pype (eds.) (2016). Ageing in Sub-Saharan Africa. Spaces and Practices of Care. Bristol: Policy Press, 248 pp. ISBN 978 1 4473 2525 3 (hardback)2018In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 91-94Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf