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  • 1.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Environmental Sociology Section, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting: Swedish media’s coverage of wildfires in three continents2019In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines domestic media’s coverage of foreign wildfires from a climate change perspective. It explores Swedish newspapers’ coverage of wildfires in Australia, the Mediterranean region, and the USA during a three-year period (February 2013–March 2016), focusing on how and to what extent climate change is viewed as an underlying cause. A central result is that climate change is mentioned far more often in the case of Australian wildfires than of fires in the other two regions. Another finding is that the climate change issue became more prominent after a severe domestic wildfire in 2014. These observations are also examined qualitatively through a combined frame and discourse study where the importance of foreign news values, the use of foreign sources, cultural proximity/distance, and domestication procedures are analysed. In conclusion, foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting in relation to extreme events are further discussed.

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  • 2.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    “Stop Blaming the Cows!”: How Livestock Production is Legitimized in Everyday Discourse on Facebook2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 28-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2016, Swedish climate reporting declined in quantity and shifted focus somewhat from climate change as such to the harmful climate impacts of meat consumption. The latter prompted discussions in social media – an increasingly important forum for public debate but infrequently studied in environmental communication research. Despite strong evidence that a meat and dairy based diet is devastating for the environment, meat consumption is increasing, and this qualitative study aims to – through the lens of social representation theory – contribute knowledge about how livestock production is legitimized in everyday discourse on Facebook. The article identifies representations that legitimize livestock production through polarization between (1) livestock production and other (environmental) issues, (2) environmentally “good” and “bad” countries, and (3) “reliable” and “unreliable” information. It concludes by discussing the influence of national ideology on the legitimization of livestock production and the potential of social media to counter the post-politicization of environmental issues.

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    Fulltext
  • 3.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    "We’re the ones to blame": Citizens' representations of climate change and the role of the media2011In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 281-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the discussion on how to meet the challenges of climate change the important role of news reporting is often emphasized; the media are considered to have significant influence on citizens' understandings of the issue. However, studies that empirically explore the media's role in shaping these understandings are rather scarce compared with analyses of media content alone. While fully acknowledging the fruitfulness of the study of media material, this article argues that there are tendencies in these studies to, in a somewhat "media-centric" fashion, reduce the complexity of the relationship between media content and audience reception. The article, which reports on findings from a focus-group study containing 53 Swedish citizens, starts from the premise that this relationship must be subjected to empirical analysis rather than axiomatically asserted, and aims to contribute empirically based knowledge on the connection between media staging of climate change and citizens' representations of this global risk.

  • 4.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    Media and climate change: Four long-standing research challenges revisited2014In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 249-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests some further avenues of empirical and theoretical investigation for media research on climate change. “Old” suggestions, whose significance, as we see it, needs to be further reinforced, are included, as are “new” ones, which we hope will generate innovative research questions. In order to integrate the analysis with knowledge generated by media research at large, we revisit four research challenges that media scholars have long grappled with in the investigation of journalism: (1) the discursive challenge, i.e. the production, content and reception of media discourse; (2) the interdisciplinary challenge, i.e. how media research might engage in productive collaboration with other disciplines; (3) the international challenge, i.e. how to achieve a more diverse and complex understanding of news reporting globally; and (4) the practical challenge, i.e. how to reduce the theory–practice divide in media research.

  • 5.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    Media Research on Climate Change: Where have we been and where are we heading?2014In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 139-141Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6. Uggla, Ylva
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    The enrollment of nature in tourist information: framing urban nature as "€˜the other"€™2013In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on the assumption that nature inevitably plays a role in urban placemaking. Today, cities worldwide are engaged in place promotion in which nature is constructed as a commodity to consume. This article explores the enrollment of nature in tourist information with a specific analytical focus on the relationship between nature and culture. Guided by framing theory and citing the case of tourist information in Stockholm, the article empirically demonstrates how nature is enrolled in tourist information and turned into a commodity through three distinct but related frames that, in various ways, construct nature as ‘‘other’’: nature as the familiar other, nature as the exotic other, and pristine nature. The article concludes that the enrollment of nature in city marketing reproduces the modern nature-culture divide, which enables the commodification of nature and helps conceal the environmental consequences of increased urban density.

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