Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adolfsson, P.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindstedt, H.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, I.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hermansson, L. N.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, G.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Perception of the influence of environmental factors in the use of electronic planning devices in adults with cognitive disabilities2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adults with cognitive disabilities often have difficulties in dealing with the complexity of everyday life. With cognitive assistive technology (e.g. electronic planning devices [EPDs] and individual support), they can bring order to their often chaotic life. Assumptions are that environmental factors influence with non-use of EPDs.

    Objective: To explore how adults with cognitive disabilities perceive the influence of environmental factors in the use of EPDs.

    Methods: A reference group with experience of use of EPDs assisted the researchers. Twelve adults with cognitive disabilities and experience of using EPDs participated. An interview guide was implemented covering environmental factors according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Qualitative content analysis was applied in the analyses.

    Results: Five categories and two themes emerged, which were integrated into a model of facilitating factors influencing the use of EPDs. Measures to prevent or eliminate negative influences of the device use are important to be taken.

    Conclusions: Professionals need more knowledge about EPDs, while users need individual adaption of the EPDs. EPDs need to be user-friendly, manageable and work in any seasons.

    Implications for Rehabilitation: The users should have access to specially trained prescribers. There is a need for development of user-friendly and manageable products to function in any climate. Knowledge is lacking on how to implement the users in all stages of the prescribing process. Prescribers should increase knowledge in the use of EPDs to influence the attitudes of the social environment.

  • 2.
    Boman, I.-L.
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Lena
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lundberg, S.
    Royal Institute of Technology, School of Technology and Health, Handen, Sweden.
    Nygård, L.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Huddinge, Sweden.
    First steps in designing a videophone for people with dementia: identification of users' potentials and the requirements of communication technology.2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 356-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To identify, based on the literature, people with dementia's potentials to manage an easy-to-use videophone, and to develop a videophone requirement specification for people with dementia.

    METHOD: The study is based on the Inclusive Design method, utilising the first two of four phases. Content analyses of literature reviews were used to identify users' potentials for managing a videophone and to gather recommendations regarding communication technology design for the target group. Existing videophones in Sweden were examined regarding potential fit to users with dementia.

    FINDINGS: This led to detailed identification of cognitive, physical and psychosocial challenges that people with dementia will probably have when using an ordinary telephone or videophone. A requirement specification for videophone design to fit users with dementia was formulated, with the seven principles of Universal Design as a framework.

    CONCLUSIONS: The requirement specification presented here is aimed at designing a videophone but might also facilitate design of other products for people with dementia, particularly in the field of communication technology. Based on this, further work will focus on developing a design concept and a prototype to be empirically tested by people with dementia and their significant others, i.e. the final two design process phases.

  • 3.
    Boman, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nygård, Louise
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Lena
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Users' and professionals' contributions in the process of designing an easy-to-use videophone for people with dementia2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 164-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To develop a design concept for an easy-to-use videophone for people with dementia and to evaluate the design and need of such a product.

    Method: In this project, we have used an inclusive design approach that includes the target users in the design process. In an earlier study, the need of a videophone was examined and a requirement specification was developed. In this study, a preliminary design concept was developed. Five focus groups of people with dementia, significant others and occupational therapists working with people with dementia were formed to capture their experiences, expectations and thoughts concerning the videophone and the design concept. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach.

    Findings: The participants pointed out that the design of the videophone should be flexible in order to meet the needs of people with dementia, be easy-to-use and not look like assistive technology. In order to facilitate learning, the videophone should be introduced in an early stage of the disease.

    Conclusions: A videophone has potentials to enable videophone calls without assistance, add quality in communication and provide possibilities for monitoring. Further work will focus on developing a prototype to be empirically tested by people with dementia and significant others.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    • An easy-to-use videophone was viewed as an important device that could support people with dementia in making videophone calls without assistance. It was also viewed as a product that significant others could use for monitoring the person with dementia, for example to judge the well-being of the person. But monitoring should be used with caution and not without the consent of the person with dementia.
    • It was viewed as important that the videophone be introduced in an early stage of the disease in order to facilitate learning, so that the person can get used to the new way of making telephone calls and incorporate the new habit in his/her routines.
    • In order to motivate people with dementia to start using a videophone, it was recommended that the videophone should be introduced as a product which is a pleasure to use, and not as a compensation for impairment or to solve a problem.
  • 4.
    Burrola-Mendez, Yohali
    et al.
    School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada; CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre, Montréal, Canada.
    Kamalakannan, Sureshkumar
    Department of Clinical Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Public Health Foundation of India, Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, India.
    Rushton, Paula W
    School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada; CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre, Montréal, Canada.
    Bouziane, Selsabil-A
    School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
    Giesbrecht, Ed
    Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada.
    Kirby, R. Lee
    Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
    Gowran, Rosemary J.
    School of Allied Health, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, Health Research Institute, Health Implementation Science and Technology, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland; Assisting Living and Learning (ALL) Institute Maynooth University, Maynooth, Ireland.
    Rusaw, David
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tasiemski, Tomasz
    Department of Adapted Physical Activity, Poznan University of Physical Education, Poznan, Poland.
    Goldberg, Mary
    Department of Rehabilitation Science and Technology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Tofani, Marco
    Department of Intensive Neurorehabilitation and Robotics, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
    Pedersen, Jessica P.
    Department of Physical Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
    Pearlman, Jon
    Department of Rehabilitation Science and Technology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Wheelchair service provision education for healthcare professional students, healthcare personnel and educators across low- to high-resourced settings: a scoping review2023In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 67-88Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This review aimed to collate and summarize available research literature about wheelchair service provision education available to healthcare professional students, healthcare personnel and educators across low- to high-resourced settings.

    METHODS: The Joanna Briggs Institute methodological steps for scoping reviews were followed. Included studies were mainly sourced from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Academic Search Complete and ProQuest. Independent title, abstract and full-text screening with defined inclusion and exclusion criteria was performed. All screening and extraction were performed independently by two authors. A thematic approach was used to synthesize results. Data extracted from included studies were charted according to a template that we created. The study quality was also appraised.

    RESULTS: A total of 25 articles were included (11, 36% from high-income settings) with 12 (48%) observational studies and 13 (52%) experimental studies. The literature addressed three main topics: (1) assessing wheelchair service provision knowledge, (2) implementing training interventions using in-person, online and/or hybrid learning approaches and (3) describing current wheelchair service provision education globally. The most frequently reported training programs used were the Wheelchair Skills Program and the World Health Organization Wheelchair Service Training Package - Basic Level.

    CONCLUSION: Limited information has been published about the integration of wheelchair content into the curricula of professional rehabilitation programs. Efforts to build international partnerships, improve the quality and currency of training programs and build resources that can assist educators in the integration of wheelchair-related content into professional rehabilitation programs should be prioritized.Implications for RehabilitationThis is the first review that examined and synthesized the current state of wheelchair service provision education for rehabilitation students and personnel across low- to high-income countries.Findings from this review indicate that there is limited information about the integration of wheelchair-related content into professional rehabilitation programs.Efforts to build international partnerships, standardize wheelchair service provision content and evaluation and integrate training into professional rehabilitation programs worldwide should be prioritized.

  • 5.
    Farries, Kevin
    et al.
    School of Civil Environmental and Mining Engineering, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Baldock, Matthew
    Centre for Automotive Safety Research, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Thompson, James
    Centre for Automotive Safety Research, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Stokes, Christopher
    Centre for Automotive Safety Research, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Institute of Health and Wellbeing, Federation University, Australia; Department of Neurosciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia; Department of Occupational Therapy, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.
    Entrapment and extraction of wheelchairs at flange gaps with and without flange gap fillers at pedestrian railway crossings2023In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Where pedestrian crossings meet rail tracks, a flange gap allows the train wheel flanges to pass. This gap can be hazardous for wheelchair users as castor wheels may become trapped. While compressible gap fillers can eliminate the flange gap, fillers are subject to wear, pose a derailment hazard to light rail vehicles and can strip grease from passing wheels. These issues could be mitigated by partially filling the flange gap with a compressible filler. The aim was to investigate the risk of entrapment and ease of extraction of wheelchair castors from flange gaps fully and partially filled with compressible fillers, and assess ride quality.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Entrapment risk and ease of extraction for four wheelchairs were tested at various crossing angles with flange gap fillers. Twelve wheelchair users tested ease of extraction and ride quality for partially and fully filled flange gaps.

    RESULTS: It was found that risk of entrapment is low if a standards-compliant crossing with open flange gaps is traversed in a straight line. However, castors can become trapped if the user alters direction to avoid an obstacle or if the crossing surface is uneven. Once trapped, castors are extremely difficult to remove without external assistance.

    CONCLUSIONS: Flange gap fillers that reduce the gap to 10 mm or less eliminate entrapment while retaining acceptable ride quality. Filling flange gaps or leaving a residual gap depth of less than 10 mm is the best option to eliminate risk of entrapment and ensure good ride quality for wheelchair users.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONRail crossings flange gaps pose an entrapment hazard for wheelchair usersPartial or complete flange gap fillers may reduce entrapment but require researchRehabilitation professionals need to educate wheelchair users on techniques to cross flange gaps safelyConsumers and health professionals can consult rail operators to partially fill flange gaps.

  • 6.
    Hsieh, Yu-Hsin
    et al.
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Odom, Samuel L.
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Hwang, Ai-Wen
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Tao-Yuan City, Taiwan; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Tao-Yuan City, Taiwan.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Increasing participation in computer activities using eye-gaze assistive technology for children with complex needs2024In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 492-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Eye-gaze assistive technology offers children with severe motor and communication difficulties the opportunity to access and control a computer through eye movements. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of eye-gaze assistive technology intervention on participation in computer activities and technology usability among children with complex needs in Taiwan.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study involved a multiple baseline design across individuals. The participants were four children aged three to six years with severe motor and communication difficulties and low eye-control skills. The six-month intervention consisted of two collaborative team meetings and 12 individual supports to facilitate the use of eye-gaze assistive technology at home or in educational environments. Participation in computer activities (diversity, frequency, and duration) was repeatedly measured through a computer use diary. Other outcomes included assessments of goal achievements and parents/teachers' ratings on children's performance in computer activities.

    RESULTS: The young children increased the diversity of their computer activities and their frequency and duration of computer use from baseline to the intervention phase. The children attained six of eight predefined goals related to play, communication, and school learning. Parents and teachers perceived the children's changes in performance as meaningful.

    CONCLUSION: This study strengthens the evidence that eye-gaze assistive technology is useful in everyday contexts for children with complex needs in Taiwan. The findings add knowledge that children with weak eye-control skills increased participation in computer activities as a result of the eye-gaze assistive technology.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    • Eye-gaze assistive technology (EGAT) as an access method to control a computer can provide opportunities for children with severe motor and communication difficulties to participate in computer activities.
    • Children with severe motor and communication difficulties and low eye-control skills with sufficient practice can learn to use EGAT for communication and learning, with support from stakeholders and collaborative service.
    • EGAT could be introduced for children with complex needs at early ages as a means of using computers for play, communication, and school learning, which could be helpful for later education and learning.
    • Stakeholders in educational environments could include EGAT in educational computer systems so that pupils with severe motor and communication difficulties could interact with a computer, thereby enhancing their engagement and learning.
  • 7.
    Kamalakannan, Sureshkumar
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Public Health Foundation of India, Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, India.
    Rushton, Paula W.
    School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada; CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre, Montréal, Canada.
    Giesbrecht, Ed
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Rusaw, David
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bouziane, Selsabil-A.
    School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
    Nadeau, Melodie
    Department of Biology, University of Concordia, Montréal, Canada.
    McKee, Jennifer
    School of Allied Health, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Gowran, Rosemary J.
    School of Allied Health, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, Health Research Institute, Health Implementation Science and Technology, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Kirby, R. Lee
    Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
    Pedersen, Jessica P.
    Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin.
    Tasiemski, Tomasz
    Department of Adapted Physical Activity, Poznań University of Physical Education, Poznań,Poland.
    Burrola-Mendez, Yohali
    Department of Rehabilitation Science & Technology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA; Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT), Ciudad de México, México.
    Tofanin, Marco
    Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT), Ciudad de México, México; Neurorehabilitation Unit, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy.
    Goldberg, Mary
    International Society of Wheelchair Professionals, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Human Engineering Research Laboratories, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Pearlman, Jon
    Department of Rehabilitation Science & Technology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA.
    Wheelchair service provision education for healthcare professional students, healthcare personnel and educators across low- to high-resourced settings: a scoping review protocol2023In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 343-349Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Appropriate wheelchair provision is necessary for addressing participation barriers experienced by individuals with mobility impairments. Health care professionals involved in the wheelchair service provision process require a specific set of skills and knowledge to enable wheelchair use that meets individual posture, mobility and daily living requirements. However, inconsistencies exist in academic programmes globally about providing comprehensive education and training programmes. The planned scoping review aims to review and synthesize the global literature on wheelchair service provision education for healthcare professional students, healthcare personnel and educators offered by universities, organizations and industries.

    Methods

    This scoping review will be guided by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) methodological framework. Comprehensive literature searches will be conducted on various global electronic databases on health to seek out how wheelchair service provision education is organized, integrated, implemented and evaluated. Two independent reviewers will perform eligibility decisions and key data extractions. Data from selected studies will be extracted and analysed using conventional content analysis. Information related to wheelchair service provision education including curriculum development, content, teaching methods, evaluation and models of integration will be synthesized.

    Implications and dissemination

    The planned scoping review will be the first to examine all aspects of wheelchair service provision education across professionals, settings and countries. We anticipate that results will inform the content of a Wheelchair Educators’ Package, and if appropriate, a follow-up systematic review. An article reporting the results of the scoping review will be submitted for publication to a scientific journal.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    • A comprehensive examination of wheelchair service provision education could help develop strategies to address the unmet need for wheelchair services globally.
    • Findings for this review will facilitate the planning and development of an evidence-based education package that could bridge the existing knowledge gaps related to safe and effective wheelchair service provision among health professionals involved.
    • This review will also inform the potential barriers and enablers for effective integration and implementation of wheelchair service provision education worldwide.
  • 8.
    Magnusson, Lina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Prosthetist/Orthotist Educational Experience & Professional Development in Pakistan2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 385-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To explore areas in which the education at the Pakistan Institute of Prosthetic & Orthotic Science (PIPOS) could be improved or supplemented to facilitate clinical practice of graduates. To describe educational opportunities PIPOS graduates have had since their graduation and explore their further educational needs.

    METHOD: 15 graduates from PIPOS participated in semi-structured interviews. A qualitative content analysis was applied to the transcripts.

    FINDINGS: Respondents indicated a need to upgrade the education at PIPOS. This should include upgrading of resources such as literature and internet access as well as providing staff with the opportunity to further their own education. Females experienced inequality throughout their education but were supported by management. Upon entering the workforce graduates reported that they were supported by senior staff but experienced difficulties in determining appropriate prescriptions. They further indicated that a multidisciplinary approach to patient care is lacking. Graduates knowledge of workshop management was identified as a problem when entering the workforce. Limited awareness of the prosthetics and orthotics profession by both the general community and the medical community was also identified as a problem. If offered the opportunity to continue their studies the respondents would like to specialize. "Brain drain" was noted as a risk associated with post graduate education. Interaction from international collaborators and networking within the country was desired.

    CONCLUSION: The education at PIPOS meets a need in the country. Graduates indicated that P&O services for Pakistan can be better provided by modifying program content, upgrading teachers' knowledge, improving access to information and addressing issues of gender equality. PIPOS graduates have had limited opportunities for professional development and have a desire for further education.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Möller, Saffran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. 0000-0002-5360-7776.
    Hagberg, Kerstin
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Perceived self-efficacy and specific self-reported outcomes in persons with lower-limb amputation using a non-microprocessor-controlled versus a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 220-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To measure self-efficacy in a group of individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and investigate the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic-specific outcomes including prosthetic use, mobility, amputation-related problems and global health. A second purpose was to examine if differences exist in outcomes based upon the type of prosthetic knee unit being used.

    Method: Cross-sectional study using the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale and the Questionnaire for Persons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA). Forty-two individuals participated in the study. Twenty-three used a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (non-MPK) and 19 used a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (MPK).

    Results: The study sample had quite high GSE scores (32/40). GSE scores were significantly correlated to the Q-TFA prosthetic use, mobility and problem scores. High GSE scores were related to higher levels of prosthetic use, mobility, global scores and negatively related to problem score. No significant difference was observed between individuals using a non-MPK versus MPK joints. Conclusions: Individuals with high self-efficacy used their prosthesis to a higher degree and high self-efficacy was related to higher level of mobility, global scores and fewer problems related to the amputation in individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and were using a non-MPK or MPK knee. Implications for rehabilitationPerceived self-efficacy has has been shown to be related to quality of life, prosthetic mobility and capability as well as social activities in daily life. Prosthetic rehabilitation is primary focusing on physical improvement rather than psychological interventions. More attention should be directed towards the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic related outcomes during prosthetic rehabilitation after a lower-limb amputation. 

  • 10.
    Narbutaitienė, J.
    et al.
    Haapsalu Neurological Rehabilitation Centre, Haapsalu, Estonia.
    Björklund Carlstedt, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fischl, Caroline
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Stroke survivors’ experiences and meaning of digital technology in daily life: a phenomenological study2023In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the experiences and meaning of digital technology in daily life by stroke survivors. Materials and methods: A phenomenological study design helped to collect rich and in-depth understanding of stroke survivors’ experiences and meaning of digital technology in their daily life and their perspective of applying digital technology in the implementation of stroke-related telerehabilitation services. Thematic analysis was used for data analysis. Findings: An overarching theme emerged: A spectrum of challenges, personal preferences, strategies to manage, and attitudes towards the use of digital technology in daily life. Conclusion: The findings revealed that participants’ different experiences influenced their perceived meaning of digital technology in daily life and the interest to participate in telerehabilitation services.

  • 11.
    Rezae, Mortaza
    et al.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    McMeekin, David
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Krishna, Aneesh
    School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Public transport planning tool for users on the autism spectrum: from concept to prototype2021In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 177-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research explored the challenges of public transport use for individuals on the autism spectrum. It, subsequently, proposed a mobile application solution, coproduced by individuals on the autism spectrum, to facilitate public transport use.

    Methods: We, first, conducted a review of the literature to highlight the challenges people on the autism spectrum face when utilizing public transport. We, then, designed a list of mobile application functionalities that address the identified problems. To validate these functionalities, 27 young autistic adults and 19 families of autistic individuals were employed. Finally, based on the findings, we designed a mobile application that helps facilitate public transport use for those on the autism spectrum.

    Results: We found that the most prevalent concerns, in public transport use, amongst autistic individuals and their families are safety and spatial awareness. Specific problems include finding one’s way to the bus stop, boarding the correct service and disembarking at the correct stop. Interestingly, anxiety about unexpected events was also a barrier. Sensory sensitivity, similarly, was found to be an obstacle.

    Conclusions: This study defined the challenges of public transport use for autistic individuals and proposed a technological solution. The findings can also inform innovators, public transport providers and policymakers to improve public transport accessibility.

    Implications for rehabilitation:

    • People on the autism spectrum heavily rely on other individuals, namely family and friends, for their transportation needs. This dependence results in immobility for the autistic individuals and significant time and economical sacrifice for the person responsible for the transportation.
    • Public transport, a cheap and widely available form of transportation, has not yet been clearly studied with individuals on the autism spectrum.
    • We clearly define the challenges of using public transport and put forward a trip planner mobile application, coproduced by autistic individuals, that facilitate it.
    • In the long term, this enhanced travel independence can lead to greater education and employment opportunities and an overall improved quality of life. 
  • 12.
    Rusaw, David
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Adaptations from the prosthetic and intact limb during standing on a sway referenced support surface for transtibial prosthesis users2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 682-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the bilateral postural adaptations as a result of standing on an increasingly unstable sway-referenced support surface with both the intact and prosthetic limb for transtibial prosthesis users (TPUs).

    Method: TPUs (n = 14) and matched controls (n = 14) stood quietly in multiple foot placement conditions (intact foot, prosthetic foot and both feet) on a sway-referenced support surface which matched surface rotation to the movement of the centre of pressure (CoP). Force and motion data were collected and used to analyse CoP mean position, displacement integral and force components under intact and prosthetic limbs.

    Results: Significant differences were found between prosthesis users and controls in CoP mean position in anteroposterior (1.5 (95% CI, 1.2–1.8) cm) and mediolateral directions (3.1 (95% CI, 0.5–5.7) cm. CoP displacement integrals were significantly different greater for prosthesis user group in the anteroposterior direction. Force components differences were found in all planes (anteroposterior: 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4–0.8 N); mediolateral: 0.1 (95% CI, 0.0–0.2 N & 0.3 (95% CI, 0.2–0.4) N, inferosuperior: 2.2 (95% CI, 1.4–3.0) N).

    Conclusions: TPUs have bilateral static and dynamic postural adaptations when standing on a sway-referenced support surface that is different to controls, and between prosthetic and intact sides. Results further support evidence highlighting importance of the intact limb in maintenance of postural control in prosthesis users. Differences indicate clinical treatment should be directed towards improving outcomes on the intact side.

    Implications for rehabilitation:

    • Prosthesis users have bilateral adaptations when standing on a sway referenced support surface

    • These adaptations are different to controls, and between prosthetic and intact sides.

    • The intact limb is the major contributor to maintenance of postural control in prosthesis users.

    • Clinical treatment should account for this when interventions are designed.

  • 13.
    Rusaw, David
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    The validity of forceplate data as a measure of rapid and targeted volitional movements of the center of mass in transtibial prosthesis users2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 686-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To validate outcome variables from the Limits of Stability protocol that are derived from the center of pressure with those same variables derived from the center of mass during rapid, volitional responses in transtibial prosthesis users.

    Method: Prosthesis users (n=21) and matched controls (n=21) executed movements while force and motion data were collected.  Correlation coefficients were used to investigate relationships between center of pressure and center of mass for: x/y coordinates positions, Limits of Stability outcome variables and muscular reaction times. 

    Results: Significant differences were seen in correlation between x/y coordinate positions toward the intact limb (mean effect size of differences: r = 0.38).  Limits of Stability variables were positively correlated (reaction time and maximum excursion range rs: 0.585 – 0.846; directional control and mean velocity range rs: 0.307 – 0.472).  Muscular reaction times correlated weakly with those from center of pressure (mean rs prosthesis users – 0.186 and controls –  0.101). 

    Conclusions: Forceplate measures are valid in describing rapid, volitional movements in unilateral transtibial prosthesis users.  Limits of Stability outcomes extracted from center of pressure and center of mass are highly correlated but can be sensitive to direction.  Muscular reaction time correlates very little with reaction times extracted from the other variables.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Saeed, Nazish
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Manzoor, Mirfa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Department of Computer Science, Sardar Bahadur Khan Women’s University, Quetta, Pakistan.
    Khosravi, Pouria
    Business School, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    An exploration of usability issues in telecare monitoring systems and possible solutions: A systematic literature review2020In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 271-281Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The idea of product usability has been discussed in several research areas including product research and development. Usability, in telecare monitoring systems, determines how much the system is effective and efficient for the telecare users. Usability has been considered an important factor in the acceptance of telecare monitoring systems by individuals who encounter challenges in the use of such systems and who possess a limited knowledge of their use.

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to explore the relevant usability issues and identify possible solutions to improve the usability of telecare monitoring systems.

    METHOD: The study is based on eight research questions and to find the answers to those research questions, a systematic literature is performed.

    RESULTS: The research findings highlight various usability issues, including the complexity of the interface, difficulty in reading the text, and insufficient provision of instructions. These studies have also suggested solutions to enhance the usability of systems, including development of the technical skills of users, explanations of usability evaluation techniques for telecare monitoring systems, and engaging the appropriate users during the development of telecare monitoring systems. Implications for rehabilitation Successful implementation of telecare monitoring systems can increase the chances of acceptance of telecare monitoring systems by the users. Implementing an efficient and effective system will make telecare users more independent at their homes. The development of usable telecare monitoring systems can significantly contribute to a basis for clinical and home-based implementation of the telehealth technology to promote remote monitoring for elderly and people with disabilities. Considering the usability issues and solutions identified in this study, it will go a long way towards aiding subsequent researchers and developers in the implementation of more usable and valid telecare monitoring systems.

  • 15.
    Tsertsidis, Antonios
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Kolkowska, Ella
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Rapado, Irene
    Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Consumer direction in the field of digital technologies and people with dementia: a literature review2021In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1364-1376Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Digital technologies have a great potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, this group is usually not involved in their development and dissemination. A consumer-directed role in the delivery of digital technologies could allow this group to regain autonomy and certain independence. This article aims to conceptualise the components of the Consumer Direction theory in the context of digital technologies and people with dementia.

    METHOD: A literature review was conducted. We searched for studies within the aforementioned context in five relevant databases, covering the years 2012-2020. Identified studies were screened and assessed for inclusion. The data were categorised using two-stage qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Forty articles were included. The results provide definitions of the four components of the Consumer Direction theory in the context of this study. Namely, what it means for people with dementia to be (1) in control of technology use, (2) offered a variety of technological options, (3) informed and supported regarding the use and training of digital technologies, and (4) actively participating in systems design. These can lead to the empowerment of people with dementia.

    CONCLUSION: The four theoretical components of the Consumer Direction theory are conceptualised differently in the context of this study. By providing new definitions, this paper contributes to research and practice. We expect the definitions to be deployed by researchers, practitioners, and policymakers for the creation of a more consumer-directed delivery of digital technologies to people with dementia.Implications for rehabilitationDigital technologies have a great potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia.A consumer-directed role in the delivery of digital technologies could empower people with dementia and give them the opportunity to take control over the offered services as well as maintain a degree of independence. The Consumer Direction theory and its components should be conceptualised differently in the context of digital technologies and people with dementia than in previous contexts that used the theory. The new definitions can be utilised by researchers, practitioners and policymakers for the creation of a more consumer-directed delivery of digital technologies to people with dementia.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf