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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Anxiety caused by simulated prehospital emergency care2019In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 29, p. 24-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the simulation, participants experience different degrees of stress and anxiety. It could be described as “Anxiety is like perpetually hearing the enemy music but never seeing the threat”. This study aimed to describe the Emergency Medical Services personnel's feelings of anxiety during simulation. The study had a qualitative design with interviews of 28 participants. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The result shows how the simulation could be perceived as a stage performance in the form of a theatre. The perceived acting was unpleasant and embarrassing due to unfamiliarity to perform. To be scrutinized meant having spectators reviewing ones' performance. It was considered more natural to care for actors than manikins. The interaction and connection with a human, even unconscious, were more natural. To care for a human did not require the imagination to empathize in the simulation.

  • 2.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Effect of repeated simulation on the quality of trauma care2017In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Simulation participants are not dependent on learning during an actual clinical situation. This allows for a learning environment that can be constructed to meet the knowledge and experience needs of the participant. Simulations in a prehospital emergency are an ideal way to address these needs without risking patient safety.

    Method

    Nurses in prehospital emergency care (n = 63) participated in simulation interventions. During the simulation, the performed trauma care was assessed in two groups of participants with different frequency of simulation.

    Results

    Several statistically significant differences and clinical improvements were found within and between the groups. Differences were noted in specific assessments, examinations, care actions, and time from assessment to action.

    Conclusion

    The result suggested that repeated simulation may contribute to a clinical improvement in trauma care, and more frequent simulation may led to even greater improvements.

  • 3.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, PreHospen - Centre for prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Learning high-energy trauma care through simulation2018In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 17, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation provides the opportunity to learn how to care for patients in complex situations, such as when patients are exposed to high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle accidents. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' perceptions of high-energy trauma care through simulation in prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with 20 nurses after performing a simulated training series. Data were analyzed using a phenomenographic method. The result indicates that simulation establishes, corrects, and confirms knowledge and skills related to trauma care in prehosp ital emergency settings. Trauma knowledge is readily available in memory and can be quickly retrieved in a future trauma situation. 

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