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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Gwinnutt, Carl
    Resuscitation Council (UK), London, UK.
    Greig, Paul
    Department of Anaesthetics, Guy’s and St Thomas’s NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
    Smart, Jonathan
    Innosonian Europe, Farnborough, Hampshire, UK.
    Mackie, Kevin
    Resuscitation Council (UK), London, UK.
    Validating peer-led assessments of CPR performance2020In: Resuscitation Plus, E-ISSN 2666-5204, Vol. 3, article id 100022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A patient’s survival from cardiac arrest is improved if they receive good quality chest compressions as soon as possible. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training subjective assessments of chest compression quality is still common. Recently manikins allowing objective assessment have demonstrated a degree of variance with Instructor assessment. The aim of this study was to compare peer-led subjective assessment of chest compressions in three groups of participants with objective data from a manikin.

    Method

    This was a quantitative multi-center study using data from simulated CPR scenarios. Seventy-eight Instructors were recruited, from different backgrounds; lay persons, hospital staff and emergency services personnel. Each group consisted of 13 pairs and all performed 2 ​min of chest compressions contemporaneously by peers and manikin (Brayden PRO®). The primary hypothesis was subjective and objective assessment methods would produce different test outcomes.

    Results

    13,227 chest compressions were assessed. The overall median score given by the manikin was 88.5% (interquartile range 71.75–95), versus 92% (interquartile range 86.75–98) by observers. There was poor correlation in scores between assessment methods (Kappa −0.051 – +0.07). Individual assessment of components within the manikin scores demonstrated good internal consistency (alpha ​= ​0.789) compared to observer scores (alpha ​= ​0.011).

    Conclusion

    Observers from all backgrounds were consistently more generous in their assessment when compared to the manikin. Chest compressions quality influences outcome following cardiac arrest, the findings of this study support increased use of objective assessment at the earliest opportunity, irrespective of background.

  • 2.
    Hellström, Patrik
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Region Kalmar County, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hellström, Amanda
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Department of Health, Medicine and Care, Nursing and Reproductive Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; The Research Section, Region Kalmar County, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Is insomnia associated with self-reported health and life satisfaction in cardiac arrest survivors? A cross-sectional survey2023In: Resuscitation Plus, E-ISSN 2666-5204, Vol. 15, article id 100455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia symptoms seem to be common in cardiac arrest survivors but their associations with important outcomes such as self-reported health and life satisfaction have not previously been reported during the early post-event period. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate whether symptoms of insomnia are associated with self-reported health and life satisfaction in cardiac arrest survivors six months after the event.

    METHODS: This multicentre cross-sectional survey included cardiac arrest survivors ≥18 years. Participants were recruited six months after the event from five hospitals in southern Sweden, and completed a questionnaire including the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale, EQ-5D-5L, Health Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Satisfaction With Life Scale. Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U test, linear regression, and ordinal logistic regression. The regression analyses were adjusted for demographic and medical factors.

    RESULTS: In total, 212 survivors, 76.4% males, with a mean age of 66.6 years (SD = 11.9) were included, and of those, 20% reported clinical insomnia. Insomnia was significantly associated with all aspects of self-reported health (p < 0.01) and life satisfaction (p < 0.001), except mobility (p = 0.093), self-care (p = 0.676), and usual activities (p = 0.073).

    CONCLUSION: Insomnia plays a potentially important role for both health and life satisfaction in cardiac arrest survivors. Screening for sleep problems should be part of post cardiac arrest care and follow-up to identify those in need of further medical examination and treatment.

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