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  • 1.
    Hugo, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Practice Based Educational Research, Epistemic Cultures & Teaching Practices.
    Sandblom, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Dybelius, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Kan elever i årskurs 5 lära sig att resonera historiskt? Uttryck för historiskt tänkande genom resonemang och historiespecifik litteracitet i vardande2023In: Nordic Journal of Literacy Research, E-ISSN 2464-1596, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 141-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can 5th grade students learn historical reasoning? The expression of historical thinking through reasoning and history-specific literacy in the making

    History teaching in primary school has shifted in line with changes in history didactic research. By 6th grade, students must have mastered historical reasoning to pass examination. This study contributes knowledge about opportunities that history teaching offers 5th grade students regarding historical reasoning, focusing on both historical thinking and history-specific literacy. Data were generated through participant observation, audio recordings and the compilation of students’ texts. The material has been analysed using two complementary theories: a model for historical reasoning and a theory of history-specific texts. These theories represent two fields of research that are both needed to capture content and expression. The analysis is supported by a grammatical focus on temporality and causality. The study shows that students in grade 5 use simple text activities such as retelling in historical reasoning about continuity and change. Complex text activities, e.g., explanation and argumentation, which are important for reasoning about causes and consequences, occur less often. However, oral processing of historical material offers opportunities to try more complex forms of historical reasoning and text activities. To further support the development of historical reasoning skills, teaching should highlight social structures, causal relationships, perspective-taking and text structure more clearly.

  • 2.
    Lundström, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå university of technology.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Worlds of many languages. Transformations in fictional text universes2020In: Nordic Journal of Literacy Research, E-ISSN 2464-1596, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 152-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of how meaning is created when participating in a fictional text universe, and thereby provides insight into literacy aspects of recreational use of fictional stories. The analysed material consists of transcriptions of pen-and-paper role-playing sessions. The results show that the role-players transform fragments of information from different languages, modalities and semiotic systems into the situated practice of role-playing. In the conclusion, the competence to transform in relation to the role-playing, and in a wider context to participate in text universes, is discussed as a multiliteracies competence needed in the situated activity. The way in which language and communication is used requires, among other things, the ability to integrate different languages, modalities and semiotic systems, which in turn opens up new perspectives on what literacy in a recreational use of text universes can be.

  • 3.
    Schmidt, Catarina
    et al.
    Institutionen för didaktik och pedagogisk profession, Göteborgs universitet.
    Skoog, Marianne
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Classroom interaction and its potential for literacy learning2017In: Nordic Journal of Literacy Research, E-ISSN 2464-1596, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 45-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article elaborates on classroom interaction in relation to literacy learning across the curriculum. Drawing on a study in two grade six classrooms in Sweden, we report on identified possibilities of interaction during 12 lessons in the two subject areas of Law and Rights and World Religions. The analysis focuses on the register of repertoires for interaction through organisation and teaching talk and, to some extent, learning talk (Alexander, 2008). These repertoires, and the possibilities they create, are related to Cummins’ (2001) framework. The results elucidate the important role interaction plays for students’ learning of literacy through subject content and vice versa. Drawing on the results, we argue it is necessary to consider the students to be participants with resources, who can increase their possibilities of taking active part in both the initial, intermediate and final phases of learning in various subject areas if interaction is more present. In this way the students can get access to classroom practices, drawing on various subject content, that more strongly support them to develop sustainable abilities of literacies and specific subject knowledge. The latter is necessary for the learning of all subjects across the curriculum, but also for future commitment within society and citizenship.

  • 4.
    Ylenfors, Mari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Linnaeus universitet, Sverige.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Rack, John
    Linnaeus universitet, Sverige.
    Arbete för flerspråkiga elever som möter svårigheter i läs- och skrivutveckling – en enkätstudie2022In: Nordic Journal of Literacy Research, E-ISSN 2464-1596, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 82-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Schools’ teaching practices for multilingual pupils experiencing difficulties in their literacy development process

    The aim of the present study is to investigate how the elementary schools in one municipality describe how they work to prevent difficulties with literacy development, to identify specific reading and writing difficulties among multilingual pupils and how they work to develop their literacy skills. A questionnaire was sent to all schools in the municipality (response rate, 77 %). A literacy model within a sociocultural theoretical framework was used in the analysis of codebreaking and meaning-making practices. The results show the need for schools to improve their capability in two crucial areas: firstly, to better utilize the students’ different linguistic resources and sociocultural experiences, and secondly to improve the collaboration with mother tongue teachers and study guidance tutors. The main conclusion is that the schools can improve their practices by taking advantage of the students’ linguistic resources to a greater extent, which plausibly can support these students’ literacy development.

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