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  • 1.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The geography of economic segregation2018In: Social Sciences, ISSN 2076-0760, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 7, no 8, article id 123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the key factors that are associated with the geography of economic segregation across US metros. It connects the sociological literature on the extent and variation of economic segregation to the urban economics literature on the factors associated with urban and regional performance. It advances the hypothesis that economic segregation will be greater in larger, denser, more knowledge-based regions as well as in light of racial factors and income inequality. It utilizes measures of Income, Educational, and Occupational Segregation along with a combined measure of Overall Economic Segregation. Our findings are in line with the hypothesis and indicate that economic segregation is associated with larger, denser, more highly educated metros. Economic segregation is also to a certain extent related with race and ethnicity, commuting style, and income inequality. 

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