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  • 1.
    Andersson, David Emanuel
    et al.
    National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Infrastructural change and secular economic development2008In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 75, no 6, p. 799-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term economic development is determined by changes to the infrastructure, especially material and non-material infrastructural networks that link agents in different locations. The infrastructure consists of the slowly changing, collective arena that supports production, exchange, and consumption, such as the built environment, transport networks, and institutions. In the short run the infrastructure can be regarded as fixed. Changes to the infrastructure are under normal conditions small enough to be disregarded by producers and consumers. With the creation of a critical link of a network, there will however be a revolutionary restructuring of the arena. Critical links are here defined as additions to infrastructural networks that create opportunities for new information and transport flows between previously unconnected regions. Such a revolutionary restructuring of infrastructural networks has been called a logistical revolution. Certain institutional pre-conditions are necessary for a logistical revolution, while the creation of a critical link is both a necessary and a sufficient condition. This paper discusses the three logistical revolutions that occurred in the 13th century, around 1600, and in the 19th century, which each had crucial similarities with the current “information revolution.”

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Klas
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ernkvist, Mirko
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    A revised perspective on innovation policy for renewal of mature economies – Historical evidence from finance and telecommunications in Sweden 1980–19902019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 147, p. 152-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the role of innovation policy for accomplishing renewal of mature industries in Western economies? Drawing upon an unusually rich dataset spanning 9752 digitized archival documents, we categorize and code decisions taken by policymakers on several levels while also mapping and quantifying the strategic activities of both entrant firms and incumbent monopolists over a decade. Our data concerns two empirical cases from Sweden during the time period 1980–1990: the financial sector and the telecommunications sector. In both industries, a combination of technological and institutional upheaval came into motion during this time period which in turn fueled the revitalization of the Swedish economy in the subsequent decades. Our findings show that Swedish policymakers in both cases consistently acted in order to promote the emergence of more competition and de novo entrant firms at the expense of established monopolies. The paper quantifies and documents this process while also highlighting several enabling conditions. In conclusion, the results indicate that successful innovation policy in mature economies is largely a matter of strategically dealing with resourceful vested interest groups, alignment of expectations, and removing resistance to industrial renewal. 

  • 3.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Digital Disruption beyond Uber and Airbnb—Tracking the long tail of the sharing economy2018In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy can be regarded as a discontinuous innovation that creates increased abundance throughout society. Extant literature on the sharing economy has been predominantly concerned with Uber and Airbnb. As little is known about where the sharing economy is gaining momentum beyond transportation and accommodation, the purpose of this paper is to map in what sectors of the economy it is perceived to gain traction. Drawing on data from social and traditional media in Sweden, we identify a long tail of 17 sectors and 47 subsectors in which a total of 165 unique sharing-economy actors operate, including sectors such as on-demand services, fashion and clothing, and food delivery. Our findings therefore point at the expanding scope of the sharing economy and relatedly, we derive a set of implications for firms.

  • 4.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden, & The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Klas
    Department of economic history, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    School of Business, Örebro University, and The Ratio Institute, Örebro, Sweden.
    Digital entrepreneurship and field conditions for institutional change – Investigating the enabling role of cities2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 146, p. 877-886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital entrepreneurship may result in institutional turbulence and new initiatives are frequently blocked by vested interest groups who posit superior financial and relational resources. In this paper, we explore the role of cities in facilitating digital entrepreneurship and overcoming institutional resistance to innovation. Drawing upon two historical case studies of digital entrepreneurship in the city of Stockholm along with an extensive material on the sharing economy in Sweden, our results suggest that cities offer an environment that is critical for digital entrepreneurship. The economic and technological diversity of a city may provide the field conditions required for institutional change to take place and to avoid regulatory capture.

  • 5.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Kumbhakar, S. C.
    Department of Economics, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, United States.
    Technical change and total factor productivity growth: The case of Chinese provinces2011In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 575-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the literature technical change (TC) is mostly assumed to be exogenous and specified as a function of the time trend or time dummies. However, some exogenous external factors other than time can also affect TC. In this paper we model TC via time trend (external non-economic) as well as other exogenous (external economic) factors (technology shifters). For this we define technology indices based on the external economic factors and the time trend. The specification of production function is then amended to accommodate these technology indices which are not necessarily separable from the traditional inputs. That is, these technology indices allow for non-neutral shift in the production function. In doing so we are able to decompose TC (a component of TFP change) into two parts. One part is driven by time and the other part is related to producer-specific external economic factors. The latter can further be decomposed into each external economic factors. The empirical model uses panel data on Chinese provinces. We identify a number of key technology shifters and their effect on technical change and TFP growth of provinces are examined. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  • 6.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Department of Economics and the Center for Public Sector Research (CEFOS), Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Nafar, N.
    Department of Economics, Göteborg University, S-411 80 Göteborg, Sweden.
    A production analysis of the manufacturing industries in Iran1998In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 183-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is concerned with the estimation of production functions, returns to scale, and measurement of the rate of technical change using panel data. Technical change is represented by single as well as multiple time trends. The underlying production technology is represented in translog functional form. A random effects model with heteroscedastic variances is used. The models are estimated using the generalized least squares method. The disturbances of cross-sectional units are assumed to be correlated over time. Empirically, our focus is on measuring technical change in Iranian manufacturing industries during the period 1971-1993. Empirical results show that single or multiple time trend representations yield different time behavior of technical change. In the multiple time trends model, we observe a sharp decline in the pattern of technical change in 1978 in relation to the political changes. In the single time trend, as expected, the sharp decline cannot be revealed due to the smooth pattern of technical progress during the entire period of study.

  • 7.
    Kim, T. -Y
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Department of Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.
    Park, J.
    Technology Management, Economics and Policy Program, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.
    Decelerating agricultural society: Theoretical and historical perspectives2010In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 479-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, societies are divided into agricultural and industrial types. This study presents theoretical and historical perspectives on decelerating agricultural societies. Agricultural demand and supply play major roles in society development. Three descriptions of an agricultural society and theories of its deceleration patterns are presented: the neo-classical production function, stage theory, and induced innovation. Two important cases of decelerating agricultural societies and their ultimate replacement by industrial societies, medieval Europe and nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States, are examined. The limitations of decelerating agricultural societies with a focus on structural problems, impacts of industrial structure, and problems of agriculture in market and non-market areas, are also discussed. The position of agriculture as described by economic development theory is established by analyzing the stages of economic development, the theory of structural change, and the theory of leading industry. Finally, the transition from an agricultural to a commercial society is described with a focus on the formation, development, value creation, and structural limitations of a commercial society. ©2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Science and Technology Studies, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, The Ratio Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Comparing coverage of disruptive change in social and traditional media: Evidence from the sharing economy2018In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 129, p. 339-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do social media differ from traditional media in their coverage of disruptive technological change? We explore how two entrants transforming the personal transportation and accommodation sectors are covered in social and traditional media. Using content analysis, we conclude that these two forms of media differ substantially. Traditional media is focused on how the two entrants affect society and their respective sectors at large, whilst social media instead function as accelerators for the entrants as they receive predominantly positive coverage. Therefore, our findings suggest that the rise of social media may accelerate the growth of disruptive innovations which can, in turn, reduce the window for response.

  • 9.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology and the Ratio Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The sharing economy in social media: Analyzing tensions between market and non-market logics2017In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 125, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is the sharing economy framed and who are the main actors driving current developments? Utilizing Social Media Analytics (SMA) for institutional analysis, we track the formation of the sharing economy in Sweden, its actors and their impact. Our findings reveal that the sharing economy in Sweden currently encompasses a wide variety of both non-market and market practices. Discussions concerning commercial exchanges, the role of profit-driven firms such as Uber and Airbnb, and the emergence of a market logic has created a state of instability. Our results point at several unresolved issues, such as taxation and regulation. Based on these findings, we suggest an expanded definition of the sharing economy which incorporates both market and non-market logics. © 2017 The Authors.

  • 10.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    Centre for Innovative Practice, School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Assessing the interplay between crowdfunding and sustainability in social media2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 141, p. 117-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to assess the degree to which sustainability-oriented dimensions are integrated within the public discourse on crowdfunding in social media. Utilizing Social Media Analytics (SMA), we track discussions on crowdfunding in user-generated content published in social media. Based on an empirical material of 141,754 user-generated content, we identify 308 entries (0.21 percent) explicitly or implicitly relating to sustainability and 80 percent of these 308 entries came from professional actors. In this material, 37 sustainability-oriented campaigns are identified and 26 of them (70 percent) received one entry. Taken together, this paper adds to previous literature by assessing and describing the seemingly minor role played by social media with regards to the interplay between crowdfunding and sustainability.

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