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  • 1.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Organisationslernen: institutionelle und kulturelle Dimensionen2000In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 463-465Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reviews the book "Organisationslernen--institutionelle und kulturelle Dimensionen (WZB-Jahrbuch)," edited by Horst Albach, Meinolf Dierkes, Ariane Berthoin Antal and Kristina Vaillant.

  • 2.
    Barry, Daved
    et al.
    Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal.
    Carroll, Brigid
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Hansen, Hans
    Texas Tech University, USA.
    To text or context? Endotextual, exotextual, and multi-textual approaches to narrative and discursive organizational studies2006In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1091-1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational researchers doing narrative and discursive research have three choices in how they approach a text: an ‘endotextual’ approach where the researcher works within a text, an ‘exotextual’ approach where the researcher works outward from a text to its context(s), or a combined exo/endotextual approach which embeds a textual analysis within contextual inquiry. Although all three methods are now widely used in mainstream organizational research, the merits of combining, sequencing, or separating them have never been systematically considered. After reviewing the advantages and limitations of each perspective, we discuss an experiment in which endo and exo methods were applied to a skit co-written by management and a communications company specializing in organizational theater. The finding that using one approach creates multiple, subtle blind spots towards the other, and even more significantly affects a researcher's capacity to effectively adopt a combined method, is used to construct an alternative ‘diatextual’ framework. This is used to frame a discussion of how multi-method textual studies of organizations might be conducted in the future.

  • 3.
    Barry, Daved
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Meisiek, Stefan
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Seeing more and seeing differently: Sensemaking, mindfulness, and the workarts2010In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 1505-1530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past years have seen a marked rise in arts-based initiatives in organizations, a field we term the workarts. In this paper, we review the workarts in light of sensemaking theory, and especially the role of mindfulness within it. We propose that the workarts foster mindfulness by directing attention away from immediate work concerns and towards analogous artifacts. We identify three distinctive workarts movements - art collection, artist-led intervention, and artistic experimentation. In each movement, we find analogous artifacts that defamiliarize organizational members' habitual ways of seeing and believing, enabling them to make new distinctions and to shift contexts: to see more and see differently. Our review raises a number of questions for the workarts in particular and research on analogical artifacts in general.

  • 4.
    Drori, I.
    et al.
    College of Management, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    A Process Model of Internal and External Legitimacy2013In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 345-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the results of a longitudinal case study depicting the relationship between internal and external legitimacy at Orion, an emergent creative professional firm. We address the following questions: How do different types of legitimacy emerge, and how do they interact to shape organizational evolution? Introducing a staged process model, we demonstrate that organizational legitimacy is a product of action, which is continually reproduced and reconstructed by members of an organization in concert with external legitimation activities. Internal and external legitimacy evolve through a process of emergence, validation, diffusion and consensus, sometimes recursively repeating the cycle when imbalances result in conflict and friction.

  • 5.
    Hjern, Benny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Political Science.
    Porter, David O.
    Implementation Structures: A New Unit of Administrative Analysis1981In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 211-227Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lampel, J.
    et al.
    Cass Business School, City University London, United Kingdom.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University College of Management, Canada.
    Drori, I.
    School of Business Administration, Faculty of Management, Tel-Aviv University, Israel.
    Discovering Creativity in Necessity: Organizational Ingenuity under Institutional Constraints2012In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 279-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lampel, J.
    et al.
    City University London, United Kingdom.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Drori, I.
    College of Management, Academic Studies, Israel.
    Organizational Ingenuity: Concept, Processes and Strategies2014In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 465-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introduction to the special issue we explore the main features of 'organizational ingenuity', defined as 'the ability to create innovative solutions within structural constraints using limited resources and imaginative problem solving'. We begin by looking at the changing views of the importance of ingenuity for economic and social development. We next analyse the nature of ingenious solutions. This is followed by a discussion of structural, resource and temporal constraints that face problem solvers. We next turn our attention to creative problem solving under constraints. We contrast 'induced' and 'autonomous' problem solving. The first arises when external stakeholders or top managers impose tasks that define problems for the individuals and groups that must solve them; the second arises when these individuals and groups recognize and define the problems for themselves. We argue that in both induced and autonomous problem solving, individuals and groups that wish to act creatively confront two types of constraint. The first are 'product constraints' that define the features and functionalities that are necessary for a successful solution. The second are 'process constraints' that stand in the way of creative problem solving in a given organizational context. We argue that both types of constraints can lead to organizational ingenuity, but that dealing with process constraints is crucial for organizational ingenuity, and hence for sustaining organizational ingenuity more generally. We provide an overview summary of the articles in the special issue, and conclude with suggestions for future research.

  • 8.
    Meisiek, Stefan
    et al.
    Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Barry, Daved
    School of Economics and Management, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Through the looking glass of organizational theatre: Analogically mediated inquiry in organizations2007In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 1805-1827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational theatre is now widely used as a platform for analogically mediated inquiry and change. Using an alternate template research strategy, we combined interview, visual, and survey methods to study the processes underlying an organizational theatre effort over a year, clarifying how theatre performances analogically affect employees' understanding of their workplace. We identified a 'looking glass' effect, where analogies create shifting reflections over time that lead to unpredictably emergent changes in the way employees perceive their organization. Our study not only informs the organizational theatre literature, but addresses broader debates on analogical thinking in organization studies, suggesting that current explanations of analogical processes may be overly restricted both in their scope and their conclusions. Specifically, we propose that compound analogues such as organizational theatre, sculpture and film will not only work differently from more abstract and singular analogues, but create very different effects as well.

  • 9. Oliver, D.
    et al.
    Roos, Johan
    Imagination Lab Foundation, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Decision-making in high-velocity environments: The importance of guiding principles2005In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 889-913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a field study of decision-making processes at two organizations operating in high-velocity environments. It reviews existing literature on managerial knowledge structures and decision-making, and identifies methodological and conceptual limitations with these approaches with respect to organizations in high-velocity environments. The authors develop two interpretive cases that focus on the articulated and social methods management teams used to make decisions. They found that both organizations used rules of thumb or heuristic reasoning in their decision-making, that these rules of thumb functioned as headlines of deeper organizational narratives, and that these narratives were grounded in emotional as well as purely rational considerations. They suggest that the term 'guiding principle' usefully integrates their three findings into a second-order concept that may be further explored in future research of both a descriptive and prescriptive nature. Copyright © 2005 SAGE Publications.

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