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  • 1.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, East Building #217, Anam-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701, South Korea.
    Kim, H.
    Department of Political Science, University of Rochester, Harkness Hall, Rochester, NY 14627-0146, United States.
    The R&D and productivity relationship of Korean listed firms2011In: Journal of Productivity Analysis, ISSN 0895-562X, E-ISSN 1573-0441, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 125-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes the relationship between R&D investment and the productivity of Korean R&D-engaged firms. An interdependent chain of equations including the propensity to invest, R&D investment and productivity are estimated in a multi-step procedure accounting for selectivity and simultaneity biases. Using Korean firm level panel data of listed firms from 1986 to 2002, we find four main empirical results. First, there is a two-way causal relationship between R&D investment and productivity for Korean listed firms. Second, Chaebol firms were associated with lower R&D growth as well as lower labor productivity growth in comparison to non-Chaebol firms. Third, there was a substantial reduction in growth rates both in R&D investment and labor productivity in 1997-1998, immediately following the Asian financial crisis. Fourth, considering the positive feedback effect from productivity growth to R&D growth, a decrease in R&D investment growth after the Asian financial crisis should have been harmful by further decreasing productivity growth. ©2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 2.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg, Viktoriagatan 30, Gothenburg, S-411 25, Sweden.
    Kumbhakar, S. C.
    Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, 78712-1172, TX, United States.
    Farm heterogeneity and technical efficiency: Some results from Swedish dairy farms1994In: Journal of Productivity Analysis, ISSN 0895-562X, E-ISSN 1573-0441, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 45-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces farm-heterogeneity in measuring technical efficiency of Swedish dairy farms using farm-level data. In calculating technical efficiency which is allowed to vary over time and across farms, we control for farm-specific effects. This is possible only when panel data is available. Furthermore, we separate technical efficiency from technical change-the presence of which is indicated by a shift in the production function over time, ceteris paribus. We also calculate percentage change in technical efficiency to examine whether farm efficiencies have improved over time. Finally, a comparison of technical efficiency, elasticities of different inputs, and technical change is made across different years and panels. The data includes four panels of dairy farms observed during the period 1976-1988, excluding 1985. ©1994 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  • 3.
    Hjalmarsson, L.
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Göteborg University, Vasagatan 1, S-411 80 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kumbhakar, S. C.
    Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1172, United States.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Department of Economics, Göteborg University, Vasagatan 1, S-411 SO Göteborg, Sweden.
    DEA, DFA and SFA: A comparison1996In: Journal of Productivity Analysis, ISSN 0895-562X, E-ISSN 1573-0441, Vol. 7, no 2-3, p. 303-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nonparametric data envelopment analysis (DEA) model has become increasingly popular in the analysis of productive efficiency, and the number of empirical applications is now very large. Recent theoretical and mathematical research has also contributed to a deeper understanding of the seemingly simple but inherently complex DEA model. Less effort has, however, been directed toward comparisons between DEA and other competing efficiency analysis models. This paper undertakes a comparison of the DEA, the deterministic parametric (DFA), and the stochastic frontier (SFA) models. Efficiency comparisons across models in the above categories are done based on 15 Colombian cement plants observed during 1968-1988. ©1996 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  • 4.
    Kim, Y.
    et al.
    Technology Management, Economics and Policy Program, Colleague of Engineering, Seoul National University, Bldg # 37-305-1, 599 Gwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742, South Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, East Building, 217, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701, South Korea.
    Analysis of Korean IT startups’ initial public offering and their post-IPO performance2010In: Journal of Productivity Analysis, ISSN 0895-562X, E-ISSN 1573-0441, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 133-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the financial crisis in Korea, by focusing on core technology, IT startups have played an important role in the recovery of Korea’s economy through innovating technologies and creating new jobs. Even though there are many startups, it is not very common to reach the point of the initial public offering (IPO) and the post-IPO performance of the firms is mostly declining. Since it is rather difficult to apply conventional performance measures to very young firms, IPO has been used as a tool for performance evaluation. This study adopts the IPO as an early-stage measure for the performance of high technology startups. It is important to find out whether an earlier IPO of firms leads to a better performance and capability of firms. We investigate the relationship between the time to IPO of firms and their post-IPO performance for 3 years after their IPO by adopting samples of 79 information technology hardware firms founded after 1996 and listed between 2000 and 2004 in the KOSDAQ. Four determinant factors, including entrepreneurs’ experience, venture capital investment, startups’ technology sourcing, and technology portfolios which determine the firm’s time lag to getting to the IPO, are identified. The findings contain several results. First, the patent has positive effects on the firms’ performance after an IPO and on the firms’ growth before the IPO. Second, a faster technology acquisition via technology alliance has a positive influence on the firms’ IPO regardless of internal technologies. Third, concentrating on core technology, instead of diversifying can mature the startup firms faster. These indicate that a startup’s efficient initial strategy is critical for its performance and it enhances the credit and confidence of the market. ©2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 5.
    Kravtsova, Victoria
    Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (WIIW), Vienna, Austria.
    Foreign presence and efficiency in transition economies2008In: Journal of Productivity Analysis, ISSN 0895-562X, E-ISSN 1573-0441, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 91-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents empirical evidence on the role of foreign presence in the performance of domestic manufacturing firms in five Central and Eastern European countries. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) was used to estimate a frontier for each sector with similar technology common for five transition countries in the sample - Bulgaria, Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Romania. Following Simar and Wilson (J Econom 136(1):31-64, 2007), this study applies a truncated regression and bootstrap technique in a second stage post-DEA analysis. Some evidence is found to support the hypothesis that foreign presence has an overall positive spillover effects on the performance of domestic firms.

  • 6.
    Kumbhakar, S. C.
    et al.
    Department of Economics, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902, United States.
    Heshmati, Almas
    United Nations University (UNU), World Inst. for Devmt. Econ. Res., Katajanokanlaituri 6B, Fin-00160 Helsinki, Finland.
    Hjalmarsson, L.
    Department of Economics, Göteborg University, SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
    How fast do banks adjust?: A dynamic model of labor-use with an application to Swedish banks2002In: Journal of Productivity Analysis, ISSN 0895-562X, E-ISSN 1573-0441, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 79-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with a dynamic adjustment process in which adjustment of a key variable input (labor) towards its desired level is modeled in a panel data context. The partial adjustment type model is extended to make the adjustment parameter both firm- and time-specific by specifying it as a function of firm- and time-specific variables. Desired level of labor use is represented by a labor requirement function, which is a function of outputs and other firm-specific variables. The catch-up factor is defined as the ratio of actual to desired level of employment. Productivity growth is then defined in terms of a shift in the desired level of labor use and the change in the catch-up factor. Swedish banking data is used as an application of the above model.

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