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  • 1.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University.
    Design information for efficient equipment supplier/buyer integration2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 484-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the underlying design information and success factors for production equipment acquisition, in order to support the design of high-performance production systems.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research strategy employed was an in-depth case study of an industrialization project, together with a questionnaire of 25 equipment suppliers.

    Findings – The study provides the reader with an insight into the role of design information when acquiring production equipment by addressing questions such as: What type of information is used? How do equipment suppliers obtain information? What factors facilitate a smooth production system acquisition?

    Research limitations/implications – Limitations are primarily associated with the chosen research methodology, which requires further empirical studies to establish a generic value.

    Practical implications – The implications are that manufacturing companies have to transfer various types of design information with respect to the content and kind of information. More attention has to be placed on what information is transferred to ensure that equipment suppliers receive all the information needed to design and subsequently build the production equipment. To facilitate integration of equipment suppliers, manufacturing companies should appoint a contact person who can gather, understand and transform relevant design information.

    Originality/value – External integration of equipment suppliers in production system design by means of design information is an area that has been rarely addressed in academia and industry.

  • 2.
    Fjällström, Sabina
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Stahre, Johan
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Information enabling production ramp-up2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 178-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper seeks to identify information enabling and supporting production ramp-up processes, by exploring critical events and the role of information in such events.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research approach was based on empirical and theoretical investigations. A selection of 30 events, considered the most critical for production ramp-up realization and/or performance at one Swedish automotive company, were categorized and constituted the base for the analysis which focused information types and sources enabling event handling.

    Findings – Information enabling event handling is a balanced combination of problem and domain information, regardless of event category. However, a differentiation concerning preference and usage of information types between experienced and less experienced personnel is identified. Problem-solving information has the character of pragmatic information, composed of complementary parts of confirmation and novelty in terms of domain and problem information. The preferred information source in all event categories was “other people”.

    Research limitations/implications – The study focuses on the application of information in relation to critical events during production ramp-up. General information theory is not addressed in depth.

    Practical implications – Information type and information source are not dependent on certain event categories, which allows a general information strategy enabling production ramp-up. To facilitate production ramp-up and event handling managers and key personnel need to apply a holistic perspective and need to be updated on domain information of the products, the equipment, and the production process during production ramp-up.

    Originality/value – The originality is in the focus and role of information to achieve an efficient production ramp-up performance. A supporting model is developed which describes the structure of pragmatic information for personnel with various levels of experience, regardless of event category.

  • 3.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    How to Improve the Use of Industrial Robots in Lean Manufacturing Systems2011In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 891-905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify how industrial robotics fits into lean manufacturing systems. This paper presents results from case studies where Swedish and Japanese manufacturing industries have been compared in order to identify differences on how advancedmanufacturing technologies and industrial robotics are utilized. Design/methodology/approach: The research has been conducted via case studies where researchers from academia have worked together with industrial companies. During the case studies, the results of interviews, observations and data collection in the form of performance measures and historical production data have been analyzed. Findings: This paper highlights some of the differences between how Swedish and Japanese companies work with industrial robotics. It also proposes some key areas where development could lead to better integration of industrial robotics into lean manufacturing systems. Originality/value: This research has been performed with the intention of identifying how manufacturing industries could increase their competitiveness through industrial robotautomation. The companies involved in the research project have received feedback on their automation solutions. The overall goal is to create a guideline for how to design industrial robotic work cells that can easily be integrated into lean manufacturing systems. This research area is important in order to increase competitiveness in industry. It is thus of value for both industry and the scientific community.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Medbo, Lars
    On the use of product data in the design of the materials supply system2004In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 641-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing focus on reducing time-to-market for new products and a prerequisite for succeeding in this is the ability to transfer and use information about the products early on in projects, thus facilitating early problem-solving. This paper focuses on the use of product data and information systems for the design of materials supply systems in product development projects. The results from a case study show that there are product data available at an early stage in the project. However, the product data have to be retrieved from several information systems and from information systems, which the materials supply systems designers cannot use. In addition, product data can be obtained by means of personal communication much earlier than they can be retrieved from the information systems. It is concluded that research and development are required so that the information systems can be utilised for early release as well as for early retrieval of preliminary information.

  • 5.
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Homogeneity of manufacturing choices in subcontractor SMEs2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 261-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the choices made in manufacturing decision categories by subcontractor small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) and determines if subcontractor SMEs make homogenous manufacturing choices.

    Design/methodology/approach – A literature review was used to develop theoretical propositions. A multiple case study with 19 subcontractor SMEs was conducted.

    Findings – Factors that might lead to homogenous choices in the manufacturing strategy decision categories were formalised into four theoretical propositions. The propositions were based on new institutionalism factors as well as SME factors. The findings reveal that there is considerable heterogeneity across the subcontractor SMEs in the various manufacturing decision categories. However, there are similarities between some manufacturing choices. This can partly be explained by the proposed factors and partly by other factors, such as SME characteristics and process choices.

    Research limitations/implications – The study reinforces the need for more research that is focused on manufacturing decisions and choices in SMEs. All cases were of Swedish SMEs belonging to three different industries, potentially limiting the generalisability of findings to other industries or countries.

    Practical implications – This study highlights the importance of the different choices made considering manufacturing and the factors influencing those choices. This provides guidance for managers when they make manufacturing choices in various decision categories.

    Originality/value – By addressing new institutionalism, SME characteristics and decision categories in the same study, the author provides new insights into the categories of manufacturing decisions.

  • 6.
    Löfving, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Manufacturing strategy frameworks suitable for SMEs2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 7-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The paper aims at increasing the understanding of how manufacturing strategy formulation can be facilitated in SMEs.

    Design/methodology/approach: The research presented in this paper follows a four-stage logic. Initially a literature review was conducted identifying a number of manufacturing strategy frameworks. Thereafter, theoretical and practical assessment criteria were established. The SME requirements were identified through five case studies. Based on these assessment criteria, identified manufacturing strategy formulation frameworks were evaluated. When a framework was found that fulfilled most of the requirements set out, a detailed analysis of the framework was done, based on criteria related to specific SME characteristics.

    Findings: In total 15 different manufacturing strategy formulation frameworks were identified in the literature. To evaluate the suitability of these frameworks in SMEs, a number of assessment criteria were established, both in theory and in practice. These assessment criteria were grouped into three parts based on their character: procedure, realisation and contextual issues. The assessment of the 15 frameworks revealed that among the identified frameworks there was one framework that stood out and fulfilled several of the criteria. However, the frameworks still need to be adapted to the specific SME characteristics.

    Practical implications: Based on an assessment of the existing manufacturing strategy frameworks we have been able to identify one framework that fulfills 10 out of 14 of the theoretical and empirical requirements.

    Originality/contribution: Although a number of manufacturing strategy frameworks exist, their applicability in practice has seldom been investigated. The results presented provide valuable knowledge for the continued work of rendering manufacturing strategy frameworks suitable and thereby useful for SMEs.

  • 7.
    Malm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Industriell Produktion.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Kommunikations- och transportsystem.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköpings universitet, Maskinkonstruktion.
    Bridging capability gaps in technology transfers within related offsets2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 640-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how capability gaps can be identified and how they can be dealt with in aircraft technology transfers in future offset deals.

    Methodology – The study is based on lessons learned as identified from three case studies of technology transfers from Saab, a Swedish aircraft manufacturing company to South Africa, the Czech Republic, and India.

    FindingsThe capability gap between sender and receiver has to be dealt with on two levels: on an organizational level; and on an individual level. It is proposed that the disseminative capacity constitutes the ability to assess the capability gap between the sender and receiver, and to convert this assessment to adaptations of the product and production process to include in an industrialization process. On the individual level, the capability-raising activities were connected to employees’ knowledge, Personal Development Plans for the transfer of explicit knowledge, as well as on-the-job training to facilitate the exchange of tacit knowledge.

    Research limitations The research is based on case studies from one company.

    Originality/value – The paper focuses on the context of offset and reports on actual experiences from a capability perspective of technology transfers within the aircraft manufacturing area. It proposes a structured way of identifying and bridging the capability gap within such transfers.

  • 8.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Department of Product Realization, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Exploring the design process of reconfigurable industrial production systems activities, challenges, and tactics2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 85-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore activities, challenges, and suggest tactics for the design of industrial reconfigurable production systems that can easily adapt to changing market opportunities.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper synthesizes the empirical findings of seven case studies including 47 in-depth interviews at four manufacturing companies.

    Findings – A conceptual production system design process and including activities that enables a long-term perspective considering reconfigurability is proposed. Additionally, critical challenges indicating that reconfigurable production system design is not a trivial issue but one that requires separate control and coordination are identified and tactics to overcome the challenges described.

    Research limitations/implications – The authors propose a process for designing reconfigurable production systems that are better suited to adjust to future needs. The knowledge of reconfigurability from the reconfigurable manufacturing system literature is applied in the general production system literature field. This study contributes to a clearer picture of managerial challenges that need to be dealt with when designing a reconfigurable production system.

    Practical implications – By clarifying key activities facilitating a long-term perspective in the design process and highlighting challenges and tactics for improvement, the findings are particularly relevant to production engineers and plant managers interested in increasing the ability to adapt to future changes through reconfigurability and improve the efficiency of their production system design process.

    Originality/value – Although reconfigurable production systems are critical for the success of manufacturing companies, the process of designing such systems is not clear. This paper stretches this by giving a comprehensive picture of the production system design process and the activities that need to be considered to meet these challenges. 

  • 9.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Reconfigurable Production System Design - theoretical and practical challenges2013In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 998-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore theoretical and practical challenges to achieve reconfigurable production system designs. Design/methodology/approach – Presented results are based on a multiple-case study involving two industrial companies and in total four production system design projects in which considerations of reconfigurability were studied. Additionally, literature related to reconfigurability and production system design was reviewed.

    Findings – For more than a decade foresight reports have pointed out the need for responsiveness to change through reconfigurability in production system design. In order to achieve reconfigurable production systems, three challenges were identified: to use a structured design methodology, to gain knowledge in reconfigurability and its characteristics, and to include the reconfigurability knowledge in a structured design methodology. Still there is no comprehensive support available for reconfigurability in the production system design process.Research limitations/implications – Limitations are mostly related to the chosen methodology approach, and additional empirical studies to establish generic results are required. Practical implications By combining knowledge from the production system design field with the reconfigurable manufacturing system field a potential of meeting identified challenges is pointed out. Originality/value This paper adds to current knowledge by pointing out three main challenges to achieving reconfigurable production systems. The paper also contributes with ideas on how to respond to these challenges.

  • 10.
    Soosay, Claudine
    et al.
    University of South Australia Business School, Adelaide, Australia.
    Nunes, Breno
    Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham, UK.
    Bennett, David J.
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden AND University of South Australia Business School, Adelaide, Australia.
    Sohal, Amrik
    Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Jabar, Juhaini
    Faculty of Technology and Technopreneurship, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Melaka, Malaysia.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strategies for sustaining manufacturing competitiveness: Comparative case studies in Australia and Sweden2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 6-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of local sustainable production in Australia and Sweden aimed at exploring the factors contributing to survival and competitiveness of manufacturing companies.

    Design/methodology/approach – In Australia, six companies were studied in 2010, with comparisons being made with three of them from earlier projects. In Sweden, eight manufacturing companies were studied on two occasions 30 years apart, in 1980 and 2010. To provide a valid comparative perspective a common format for data collection and analysis was used.

    Findings – There has been a shift in the nature of competition in both Sweden and Australia due to an increasing complexity of the global business environment as well as changes in technology and customer expectations. Despite the differences in country context, the findings suggest that all the manufacturing companies have a good awareness of the elements of the market environment and the relationships with their competitive strategy. However, in general, the Swedish companies have more experience of managing the risks and benefits from operating in the international environment.

    Research limitations/implications – The results of the research are based on a relatively small sample of case companies in a limited number of industrial sectors. There are methodology implications for future research in the area.

    Practical implications – The research results have practical implications for the manufacturing industry, especially for companies operating in a competitive international environment.

    Originality/value – The paper is based on original case research and comparative analysis of data from different geographical contexts. It contributes to both theory and management practice about the strategic resources, decision choices, competitive environments and firm values needed to address external market demands as well as in building internal capabilities.

  • 11.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping university.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping university.
    Interface challenges and managerial issues in the industrial innovation process2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 218-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of challenges related to interfaces in industrial innovation processes, together with suggestions on how these interface challenges can be managed. The paper investigates similarities and differences between the interfaces and identified challenges in terms of required managerial issues.

    Design/methodology/approach: The result presented in this paper is based on in-depth case studies of ten product development projects from five different manufacturing firms in Sweden. The empirical results are supplemented with results from a review of relevant literature.

    Findings: To manage the interface challenges market uncertainty, technological uncertainty, product complexity and/or degree of change in product, production complexity and/or degree of change in production, geographical and/or organisational dispersion between technology development and product development, and between product development and production, it was found that several issues have to be considered. Most of the identified managerial issues concern transfer synchronisation, transfer management and transfer scope. The authors have shown that despite many differences between the different phases in the innovation process, a quite concordant picture emerges when it comes to how to manage interface challenges.

    Practical implications: The classification of managerial issues into transfer synchronisation, transfer management and transfer scope provides an overview of areas that need to be addressed to manage interface challenges during the industrial innovation process. This knowledge provides some guidance for managers aiming at a smooth transition process, from technology development to production.

    Originality/value: By addressing both the interface between technology development and product development, and between product development and production in the same study, the authors have been able to provide a comprehensive overview of managerial issues related to interfaces challenges in industrial innovation processes in manufacturing firms.

  • 12.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    A longitudinal study of Swedish manufacturing: eight short cases2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 535-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study the status of Swedish manufacturing industry and compare with the status of 30 years ago.

    Design/methodology/approach – The author conducted a series of semi-structured interviews with follow-up questions, transcribed and sent back to the companies for approval.

    Findings – It was found that all eight factories are still running, although one is to be switched to another owner and other types of production. Another company faces severe financial problems and it is questionable if it will survive. All but two of the companies.

    Research limitations/implications – The study was made at factory and production systems level, thus no studies were made at the group level. Sometimes it was hard to determine the financial key performance indicators (KPIs) for the factory, since they were kept secret.

    Practical implications – Most companies have worked hard on lean production and it can be seen that this has had a considerable impact on their routines. Even when companies change owners and go global, it is possible to keep the tradition of the companies and to keep the core products and processes at factory level.

    Social implications – The companies are consistent at keeping their skilled employees, but the traditional “Swedish model” in work organisation, which emphasises cross-functional teams and self-managing groups, has been abandoned.

    Originality/value – The research described in the paper is valuable since it was possible to re-do a study made 30 years ago at the same factories. The focus of the follow-up study was the same, but extended with additional issues such as globalisation and sustainability.

  • 13.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University.
    Sustainable production indicators at factory level2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 842-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Sustainable production (SP) is a very broad area and the awareness and communication of the concept differ between varying levels in a company. The supposition is that the awareness and improvement of sustainability on shop floor level would improve, if a suitable set of indicators for measuring sustainability was available. The purpose of this paper is therefore to identify a list of performance indicators relevant for a production manager.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents a two-step analysis, where the first step is a literature review with the purpose of compiling a gross list of sustainability indicators relevant on shop floor level. In the second phase, the relevance of this list for production managers in Swedish small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is tested in a questionnaire survey.

    Findings – The conclusion from the survey is that 27 out of 52 proposed indicators were relevant with statistical significance and that another 20 indicators were supported by at least 50 percent of the respondents. The respondents found the economic indicators to be most relevant for their purpose. However, the economic field seems to need more indicators in order to be more useful for daily operation.

    Practical implications – This set of indicators may be beneficial for companies seeking relevant indicators to drive sustainability improvements.

    Originality/value – This paper takes a new perspective on SP, as it focusses on shop floor production, which is possible to influence for a production manager.

  • 14.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    R&D in Sweden and manufacturing in China: a study of communication challenges2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 258-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore communication challenges related to geographic distance, with emphasis on differences in national culture and language between R&D and manufacturing engineers, in a development project faced with uncertainty and equivocality.

    Design/methodology/approach: The results originate from a longitudinal single-case study of a commercial product development project.

    Findings: Three communication challenges are identified: clarity of shared information, intention to share information, and responsiveness to information received. The challenges are strongly associated with differences in national culture and language. The study also indicates that the communication challenges cannot only be handled by the use of rich communication media, but also by employment of communication media of low richness such as e-mails or “picture books”.

    Research limitations/implications: The single-case study approach limits the ability to generalize the findings. Future research should thus focus on additional studies of geographically separated R&D and manufacturing.

    Originality/value: The results from the study provide important insights for the management of product development in geographically dispersed settings. The findings emphasize the need to consider potential differences in national culture and language within a product development team. Acknowledging these differences and managing them properly can support efficiency of product development projects.

  • 15.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM–supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up.

    Design/methodology/approach: The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research.

    Findings: This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM–supplier integration, the OEM’s research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM’s (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM–supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator’s role, the OEM’s face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers’ formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally.

    Originality/value: This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up. 

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