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  • 1.
    Bradley, Steven W.
    et al.
    Baylor University.
    Shepherd, Dean A.
    Indiana University.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    The importance of slack for new organizations facing 'tough' environments2011In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 1071-1097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategy-based models centre on the management of unique and valuable resources to take advantage of specific market opportunities. Less examined in this approach are the roles of slack resources in the process of generating firm value – particularly for new firms in ‘tough’ environments where fewer opportunities are available. Using a cohort panel of 951 new manufacturing firms over nine years, our findings provide evidence for the importance of financial slack resources in understanding opportunity generation and also for reconciling theoretical arguments regarding the slack resource–performance link. We find that while financial slack does provide buffering capacity (in hostile and dynamic environments), and flexibility for experimentation (in munificent and dynamic environments) as suggested by prior theory, the most positive relationship between financial slack and performance for new firms was in low discretion environments (hostile and stable environments) – where firms need to develop their own opportunities. The implications of these findings for theory are discussed.

  • 2.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Macquarie Business School, Macquarie University, Department of Management, Sydney, Australia.
    Welsh, Dianne H. B.
    Bryan School of Business & Economics, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States.
    Ireland, R. Duane
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States.
    Sieger, Philipp
    Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Family versus non-family firm franchisors: Behavioral and performance differences2021In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 165-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from resource-based theory, we argue that family firm franchisors behave and perform differently compared to non-family firm franchisors. Our theorizing suggests that compared to a non-family firm franchisor, a family firm franchisor cultivates stronger relationships with franchisees and provides them with more training. Yet, we predict that a family firm franchisor achieves lower performance than a non-family firm franchisor. We argue, however, that this performance relationship reverses itself when family firm franchisors are older and larger. We test our hypotheses with a longitudinal dataset including a matched-pair sample of private U.S. family and non-family firm franchisors.

  • 3.
    Geiger, Susi
    et al.
    Univ Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.;Univ Coll Dublin, Coll Business, Dublin, Ireland..
    Stendahl, Emma
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Breaching, Bridging, and Bonding: Interweaving Pathways of Social-Symbolic Work in a Flanked Healthcare Movement2023In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how heterogeneous and distributed forms of social-symbolic work combine over time to yield synergistic relationships that precipitate institutional change. We study a collective effort by patient activists to change the technological and regulatory standards of Type 1 diabetes care. We offer contributions to radical flank theory by conceptualizing radical and moderate flanks as dynamic and overlapping pathways of action rather than fixed actor positions, and we show how a medial 'bonding' pathway can provide important social glue to connect the radical and moderate flanks. While in our case the material and discursive 'hacking' work in the breaching pathway disrupted institutions, triggered technology innovation, and created momentum for change, material and relational 'bridging' embedded these efforts into existing institutional structures and longer-term innovation trajectories. Values and amplification work in the bonding pathway served to keep the two other pathways aligned over time. By addressing how a complex social problem - patient-centric innovation - may be affected through heterogeneous social-symbolic work that leads to institutional accommodation, our study holds considerable policy and societal relevance.

  • 4.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Lampel, J.
    City University London, United Kingdom.
    Siegel, D.
    Drnevich, P.
    Ethics in the production and dissemination of management research: Institutional failure or individual fallibility?2014In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 118-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 50 years, we have witnessed considerable growth in business education, increased competition among business schools, and higher expectations for faculty scholarship. Increasing competition among scholars for limited publication opportunities in top-tier journals and the proliferation of bottom-tier journals has given rise to a variety of systemic ethical issues and dilemmas, for scholars and their institutions. In this article, we critically examine the current state of normative publishing activities and expectations, including doctoral education, promotion and tenure processes and research expectations, editorial and peer review processes, academic freedom, acceptable breadth, depth, and accuracy or legitimacy of research designs and methodologies, academic integrity, replication, and data availability concerning the trends and implications of contemporary and future management scholarship. We also provide recommendations for additional research and discussion on these issues.

  • 5.
    Ilyas, Imran M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kammerlander, Nadine
    WHU Otto Beisheim Sch Management, Vallendar, Germany..
    Turturea, Roxana
    Stockholm Sch Econ, House Innovat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    van Essen, Marc
    Univ South Carolina, Columbia, SC USA.;Univ South Carolina, 1014 Greene St, Columbia, SC 29208 USA..
    When Business Model Innovation Creates Value for Companies: A Meta-Analysis on Institutional Contingencies2023In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a meta-analysis based on 147 primary studies from 27 countries, we synthesize extant knowledge on the relationship between business model innovation (BMI) and firm performance. Our results show that the positive BMI-firm performance relationship is robust across various conceptualizations of and measures for BMI. Building on prior research suggesting that not all companies benefit equally from engaging in BMI, we set out to study important institutional-level contingencies for the BMI-performance relationship. We build on the institution-based view as theoretical perspective and combine it with insights from the innovation literature to theorize that the magnitude of the positive effect of BMI on firm performance depends on institutional contingencies, specifically national culture and pro-market institutions, because these national institutions affect BMI-driven organizational learning processes. Specifically, we argue and show that the positive relationship between BMI and performance is weaker in countries characterized by high levels of masculinity and individualism, and stronger in countries characterized by high levels of customer orientation, economic freedom, and education. Besides the country-level contingencies, the inclusion of various control variables in our meta-analysis also reveals that, even if located in the same institutional environment, start-up firms benefit more from BMI than mature firms and that there are no observable differences regarding BMI benefits among different industries. Moreover, a nuanced analysis shows that the positive effect on performance is stronger when BMI rely on changes in cognitive schemas compared to BMI that are of more technical nature.

  • 6.
    Ivanycheva, Diana
    et al.
    Macquarie Business School - Macquarie University, NSW, Sydney, Australia.
    Schulze, William S.
    University of Utah - David Eccles School of Business, Salt Lake City, UT, United States.
    Lundmark, Erik
    Macquarie Business School - Macquarie University, NSW, Sydney, Australia.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Macquarie Business School - Macquarie University, NSW, Sydney, Australia.
    Lifestyle entrepreneurship: Literature review and future research agenda2023In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in leading entrepreneurship and management journals has tended to conceptualize entrepreneurship as motivated by the goals of wealth, income, or social value creation. This research has thus largely overlooked entrepreneurial motivations such as the desire to engage in particular activities that the entrepreneurs find rewarding or the desire to live in particular locations. The literature on such Lifestyle Entrepreneurship (LE) includes research on artisan, artistic, craft, creative, fitness, hobbyist, leisure, sport, and tourism entrepreneurship. This literature has grown quickly over the last decade, but it is scattered across a range of domains, disciplines, and journals and lacks conceptual clarity. In this review, we take stock, synthesize and offer definitions and a framework for investigation of LE that allows for its development and theoretical integration with, and contribution to, existing entrepreneurship theory. We conceptualize LE in relation to its purpose and function, identify different types of LE, and examine their respective antecedents, behaviors, and outcomes. We propose a research agenda based on the merits of viewing LE as a distinctive and theoretically important domain for the study of entrepreneurship and highlight the vital role that LE plays in enriching both individual and social welfare.

  • 7.
    Lockett, A.
    et al.
    Nottingham University Business School.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Girma, S.
    Nottingham University Business School.
    Organic and acquisitive growth: Re-examining, testing and extending Penrose’s growth theory2011In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 48-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Edith Penrose's theory of firm growth postulates that a firm's current growth rate will be influenced by the adjustment costs of, and changes to a firm's productive opportunity set arising from, previous growth. Although she explicitly considered the effect of previous organic growth on current organic growth, she was largely silent about the effect of previous acquisitive growth. In this paper we extend Penrose's work to examine how previous rates of organic and acquisitive growth influence current organic growth. Employing a panel of Swedish firms over a 10-year period, our results suggest the following. First, previous organic growth acts as a constraint on current organic growth. Second, previous acquisitive growth has a positive effect on current organic growth. We conclude that organic growth and acquisitive growth constitute two distinct strategic options facing the firm, which have a differential impact on the future organic growth of the firm.

  • 8. Marotto, M.
    et al.
    Roos, Johan
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Victor, B.
    Collective virtuosity in organizations: A study of peak performance in an orchestra2007In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 388-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to build theory on peak performance at the group level. Peak performance transcends ordinary performance and is associated with a subjective experience in which one loses a sense of time and space as well as feels great joy and bliss. We chose to study this phenomenon at the group level through a methodology of participant observation in an orchestra. We found that groups can be transformed by their own performance in a reflexive process in which virtuosity, or individual peak performance, becomes collective. We offer a prepositional model of collective virtuosity in organizations, and offer directions for further research. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2007.

  • 9.
    Melin, Leif
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Johnson, Gerry
    Whittington, Richard
    Guest Editors' Introduction. Micro Strategy and Strategizing: Towards an Activity-Based View2003In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 3-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Miller, Danny
    et al.
    HEC Montreal and University of Alberta, Canada.
    Le Breton-Miller, Isabelle
    HEC Montreal and University of Alberta, Canada.
    Minichilli, Alessandro
    Bocconi University, CRIO, Italy.
    Corbetta, Guido
    Bocconi University, CRIO, Italy.
    Pittino, Daniel
    University of Udine, Italy.
    When do non-family CEOs outperform in family firms? Agency and behavioural agency perspectives2014In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 547-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family firms represent a globally dominant form of organization, yet they confront a steep challenge of finding and managing competent leaders. Sometimes, these leaders cannot be found within the owning family. To date we know little about the governance contexts under which non-family leaders thrive or founder. Guided by concepts from agency theory and behavioural agency theory, we examine the conditions of ownership and leadership that promote superior performance among non-family CEOs of family firms. Our analysis of 893 Italian family firms demonstrates that these leaders outperform when they are monitored by multiple major family owners as opposed to a single owner; they also outperform when they are not required to share power with co-CEOs who are family members, and who may be motivated by parochial family socioemotional priorities.

  • 11.
    Minichilli, Alessandro
    et al.
    Bocconi University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Corbetta, Guido
    Bocconi University.
    Daniele, Mario
    Bocconi University.
    CEO Succession Mechanisms, Organizational Context, and Performance: A Socio-Emotional Wealth Perspective on Family-Controlled Firms2014In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 1153-1179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article extends the literature on CEO succession and financial performance by addressing corporate owners' mixed motives and desires to protect their interest in being in business. We draw on a Socio-Emotional Wealth (SEW) perspective to investigate how the choice of one of three succession mechanisms – relay succession, ‘horse races’ among internal CEO candidates, and hiring from outside – may effectively balance trade-offs between corporate owners' non-financial SEW motives and the firm's financial performance. We find that implementing one of these succession mechanisms reduces the negative impact that typically characterizes CEO transitions in family firms. We also show that family presence on the board of directors offsets the benefits of having selected these balancing succession mechanisms, in either placing too much emphasis on SEW, or creating negative dynamics that make the chosen succession mechanisms less effective.

  • 12.
    Pinelli, Michele
    et al.
    Department of Management, University Ca’ Foscari, Venice, Italy.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Macquarie Business School – Macquarie University, Australia.
    De Massis, Alfredo
    Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy.
    Zattoni, Alessandro
    Department of Business and Management, Luiss University, Roma, Italy.
    Acquisition relatedness in family firms: Do the environment and the institutional context matter?2023In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the acquisition behavior of family firms has produced conflicting theoretical arguments and mixed empirical findings on their propensity to acquire related or unrelated targets. While previous work has mainly focused on firm-level variables, this study examines the environment in which family firms operate and the institutional context where acquisitions take place. Drawing on the mixed gambles logic of the behavioral agency model, we theorize that family firms are more likely than nonfamily firms to undertake related acquisitions when they operate in uncertain environments to avoid losses to the family’s current socioemotional wealth. However, family firms are more likely to undertake unrelated acquisitions, when the environment is uncertain but the target operates in a similar and more developed institutional context where prospective financial gains are more predictable. Overall, building on a sample of 1,014 international acquisitions, our study offers important contributions to the literature on family firms and acquisitions.

  • 13.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lundberg, Hans
    Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City and School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Växjö/Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Next generation external venturing practices in family owned businesses2021In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 63-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an Entrepreneurship as Practice (EaP) approach, this article examines how next generation members in family owned businesses (FOBs) engage in external venturing. Our study builds on longitudinal qualitative research in two Mexican FOBs where the next generation launched ten ventures. It reveals five different practices of external venturing used by next generation family members: ‘obtaining family approval', ‘bypassing family', ‘family venture mimicking', ‘jockeying in family', and ‘jockeying around family.' The five practices are combined into three routes for external venturing: ‘imitating the family business', ‘splitting the family business', and ‘surpassing the family business.' Building on notions from de Certeau's practice theory (1988/1984), we present the five practices as ways of operating and the routes as modes of sensing to better understand how next generation family members deal with settings featured by dominant orders within the family and the FOB in their attempts to originate and launch their new ventures.

  • 14. Zahra, Shaker
    et al.
    Sapienza, Harry
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Entrepreneurship and Dynamic Capabilities: A Review, Model and Research Agenda2006In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 917-955Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 14 of 14
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