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  • 1.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Sex business in the toy store: A narrative analysis of a teaching case2007In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 673-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a narrative analysis of an entrepreneurship case performed from a post-structuralist feminist perspective. Acknowledging the social construction of reality, gender is conceptualized as performed rather than as an essential quality attached to male and female bodies. The analysis finds that the case reproduces discriminatory gender relations. While using such cases in entrepreneurship training may teach pragmatic lessons, they also teach women that there is no place for them in business. Suggestions for improvement include cases with female protagonists, gender-inclusive language, stories that challenge received entrepreneurship ideas, and the introduction of narrative analysis to enrich students' learning opportunities.

  • 2.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Nelson, Teresa
    Simmons College, Boston USA.
    How policy positions women entrepreneurs: A comparative analysis of state discourse in Sweden and the United States2015In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 273-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research compares the positioning of women entrepreneurs through entrepreneurship policy over two decades (1989–2012) in Sweden and the United States. Given Sweden’s uniquely family-friendly welfare state, we could expect different results, yet in both countries we find a legacy of discourse subordinating women’s entrepreneurship to other goals (i.e., economic growth) and a positioning of women as ‘other’, reinforcing a dialogue of women’s inadequacy or extraordinariness without taking full account of the conditions shaping women’s work experience. From this analysis we derive a conceptual schematic of assumptions presented through the discourse, aligning and distinguishing the U.S. and Swedish approaches

  • 3.
    Bradley, Steven W.
    et al.
    Hankamer School of Business, Baylor University.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Shepherd, Dean A.
    Kelley School of Business, Indiana University.
    Swinging a double-edged sword: The effect of slack on entrepreneurial management and growth2011In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 537-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource slack represents a double-edged sword, simultaneously fueling and hindering growth. Drawing on Penrose's growth theory and Stevenson's entrepreneurial management theory, we have developed and tested a conceptual model that provides a more nuanced account of the resource slack–growth relationship. Using a large dataset spanning six years, we have found that slack has a positive direct effect on growth but a negative effect on entrepreneurial management, and that entrepreneurial management has a positive effect on growth. Our empirical and conceptual findings are important to the development of firm growth theory and explicate causal mechanisms transforming slack into firm-level outcomes.

  • 4.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Patzelt, Holger
    Sheperd, Dean
    Managers' Emotional Displays and Employees' Willingness to Act Entrepreneurially2008In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 221-243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Chandler, G. N.
    et al.
    Honig, Benson
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ont., Canada.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Creation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Antecedents, moderators, and performance consequences of membership change in new venture teams2005In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 705-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on initial team size and membership change of new venture teams in two studies: (1) a panel study of 408 emerging ventures, and (2) a cross-sectional study of 124 new ventures. The findings suggest that larger initial team size provides an advantage for new organizations, and that the benefits of adding and dropping team members are contingent on the stage of development of the organization and the dynamism of the environment. Both external environment and team composition factors are associated with turnover in venture teams.

  • 6. Chandler, Gaylen
    et al.
    McKelvie, Alexander
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Asset specificity and behavioral uncertainty as moderators of the sales growth: employment growth relationship in emerging ventures2009In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 373-387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Chandler, G.N.
    et al.
    Honig, B.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Antecedents, moderators and performance consequences of membership changes in new venture teams2005In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 705-725Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dahlqvist, Jonas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The market newness of new venturesIn: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dahlqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Measuring the market newness of new ventures2012In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 185-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present lack of instruments for measuring entrepreneurial opportunity is hampering progress in entrepreneurship research and fundamental hypotheses about opportunity variance are not being tested. This paper sets out to validate a measure of market newness in new ventures based in Austrian Economics, assuming a view of opportunity as objective and discoverable. Empirically, a sample of 250 new internal ventures in gestation was examined regarding to whom these ventures presented something new in terms of geographical extension or new customer groups. The measure improves on existing instruments by providing more intrinsic range while being firmly anchored in an Austrian Economics framework.

  • 10.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Honig, Benson
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel.
    The role of social and human capital among nascent entrepreneurs2003In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 301-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines nascent entrepreneurship by comparing individuals engaged in nascent activities (n=380) with a control group (n=608), after screening a sample from the general population (n=30,427). The study then follows the developmental process of nascent entrepreneurs for 18 months. Bridging and bonding social capital, consisting of both strong and weak ties, was a robust predictor for nascent entrepreneurs, as well as for advancing through the start-up process. With regard to outcomes like first sale or showing a profit, only one aspect of social capital, viz. being a member of a business network, had a statistically significant positive effect. The study supports human capital in predicting entry into nascent entrepreneurship, but only weakly for carrying the start-up process towards successful completion.

  • 11.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Steffens, P.
    Fitzsimmons, J.
    Growing profitable or growing from profits: Putting the horse in front of the cart?2009In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 388-406Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Delmar, Frédéric
    et al.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Gartner, William
    Arriving at the high growth firm2003In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 189-216Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Honig, Benson
    University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Human capital and structural upheaval: A study of manufacturing firms in the west bank2001In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 575-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms in various worldwide locations are repeatedly subjected to radical political, economic, and social upheavals, including changes in administrative governance, new economic paradigms, natural disasters, and warfare. Perhaps because of the difficulty of conducting research in these environments, little is known regarding the unique requirements of entrepreneurs and their business organizations in such troubled locations. Reliable research and information is necessary in order to design and assess methods of providing institutional support both during, and after, such turmoil. Based on data collected from field interviews over a six-month period, this article examines the characteristics of the owners of 64 small manufacturing businesses that have undergone or were experiencing radical political and economic upheaval in the West Bank town of Ramallah in the Palestinian Territories. The objective of the study is to examine characteristics that influence and assist an entrepreneur's resource allocation decision-making processes. This was done by comparatively assessing the effects on profitability of both firm and individual assets in a highly constrained rapidly changing environment. Understanding this allocation process will lead to more effective targeted assistance in regions experiencing or exiting environmental transitions and upheavals. Human capital theory is utilized in this study as a framework for understanding the comparative response of owners to reallocate resources under the stressful environment of the pre- and post-intifada West Bank territories. While human capital has been well studied in literature examining resource allocation in "typical" competitive environments, our understanding of the influence of human capital in transitional environments is quite limited. This study provides some useful, and perhaps surprising results, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Owner's human capital (coded from formal education) was found to impact profitability only with the micro firms studied (those with three or fewer employees), however, it is possible that this finding reflects dilution of human capital in comparatively larger small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). One interesting departure from similar studies is that experience was not found to affect the profitability of the firm. Plant capital, on the other hand, was found to be associated with the profitability of only larger SMEs, controlling for business age and experience of the owner. This finding is significant because, presently, institutions such as the World Bank, NGOs and national development agencies focus their efforts primarily on providing credit to small businesses, whereas training and education currently are somewhat out of favor. A model is proposed in this study comparing resource requirements according to both the size and the productivity/technological level of the firm. The object is to explain the reduced importance of human capital and experience in environments of radical transition, specifically the arbitrary nature and lack of predictability of transitional governance, and the increased importance of financial capital only with large SMEs. It is argued that skills acquired in functional expertise do not necessarily prepare an entrepreneur for the abrupt environmental transformations characteristic of tumultuous political events. This research suggests that owners are in a better position to maximize their cognitive skills in decision making within smaller organizations. However, these skills are naturally diffused and so less effective at influencing the outcomes of somewhat larger organizations. Larger SMEs are necessarily more capital intensive and more bureaucratic, and so the cumulative human capital at the organizational level may be more important to allocative efficiency than the human capital of the individual firm owner. Further, larger SMEs require organizational expertise that may not be captured in the individual level characteristics of entrepreneurs. This research suggests that efforts to support such environments should carefully consider the size of the firms in question before designing and implementing programs of assistance, differentiating microenterprises from small businesses. In particular, the findings of this study suggest that smaller firms experiencing rapid environmental upheaval will benefit most from formal education, training and advice. Larger firms, in contrast, appear to benefit most from loans providing traditional capital support, and from advice across the entire firm's human capital base, particularly regarding organizational management and delegation skills. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  • 14.
    Honig, Benson
    Tel Aviv International School of Management, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    What determines success?: Examining the human, financial, and social capital of Jamaican microentrepreneurs1998In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 371-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the performance of 215 informal microenterprises in Jamaica, studying the influence of human capital, social capital, and financial capital of the owners on their business profitability. Understanding the importance of particular relationships that result in successful micro-businesses is important for a number of reasons. First, among many developing countries, the growth of microenterprise provides the most visibly vibrant and growing economic activity. Although considerable effort and resources are being directed toward microenterprise promotion schemes, empirical research on the subject is quite limited. Second, economies in developing countries mirror many of the social and institutional problems existent in urban economically disadvantaged areas of the United States and other developed countries. For these areas, microenterprise may be an essential component of urban renewal and community development. This study helps in identifying important characteristics of social and individual attributes that may be relevant to those attempting to strengthen this subsector. Finally, this study seeks to provide insight into a dimension of microbusiness research for which there are limited data, specifically, the role that social capital plays among practicing entrepreneurs and owners. This research found that different structural environments, even within a singular and small economy, may considerably alter the rates of return to human, social, and financial capital. As a result, the analysis of enterprises includes segmentation according to both the usage, or not, of employees, and the sophistication of the technologies used. Several factors were determined to enhance the profitability of the businesses in all categories. Vocational training, for example, demonstrated consistently strong and positive effects. Mother's high occupational status (a proxy for socioeconomic status) and years of experience in the business were also consistently positive and strongly associated with increasing profits. Although additional starting capital played an important role for both the businesses with and without employees, increasing amounts failed to differentiate the success of those firms that were already operating in the higher technological tier. Obtaining a small business loan acted in a similar manner, enhancing the profitability of all firms, except those segmented into a high technological tier. One interpretation of this finding is that the role of technological choice is extremely important, and appears to dwarf that of varying amounts of starting capital. Social capital, as operationalized by frequent church attendance and marital status of the owner, was found generally to increase the profitability of the business. The data demonstrate that social networks play an important role in the success of these businesses, and that conditions in the highest tier utilize social capital in a somewhat unique manner.

  • 15.
    Jenkins, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Individual responses to firm failure: Appraisals, grief, and the influence of prior failure experience2014In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 17-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a systematic assessment of how entrepreneurs react to firmfailure. We use appraisal theory as an overarching theoretical framework andhypothesize that the more the failure experience is appraised as stressful interms of its implications for harm or loss, the greater the feelings of grief. Totest this hypothesis we developed a unique database of entrepreneurs whorecently filed for firm bankruptcy. Our results support that there is greatvariation in responses to firm failure, and we provide theoretically validexplanations to why this is the case. These findings have substantialimplications for how scholars conceive and theorize about entrepreneurialfailure.

  • 16.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Honig, Benson
    Wilfrid Laurier University, School of Business and Economics, Waterloo, Ont., Canada.
    Judging a business by its cover: An institutional perspective on new ventures and the business plan2009In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 27-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business plans are widely spread among new businesses, and they are supported by various universities, governmental assistance agencies, management consultants and a wide array of literature. Business plans are often taken for granted as highly useful tools that should be frequently updated and used. This study is based on data from six companies and their environments, over five years, using several forms of data collection such as interviews, observations, and archival data. In contrast to previous studies, we found that initial conformity to business plan norms gradually and without exception lead to loose coupling. Entrepreneurs who wrote business plans never updated or rarely referred to their plans after writing them.

  • 17.
    Naldi, Lucia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Entrepreneurial growth: the role of international knowledge acquisition as moderated by firm age2014In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 687-703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with repeated recent calls for research on specific forms of growth rather than on an undifferentiated notion of “total growth,” our study contributes to the understanding of entrepreneurial growth. By this we mean growth through expansion into new geographic markets and/or via the introduction of new products or services. Building on Penrose's theory of the growth of the firm and on the research streams she has in part inspired, we investigate the impact of knowledge acquisition from international markets on entrepreneurial growth both at home and abroad. We further suggest that the effects of international knowledge acquisition on entrepreneurial growth will vary with firm age. Utilizing longitudinal data on 138 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), we find that the acquisition of knowledge from international markets fuels growth through market development, and that this effect is stronger for international expansion than domestic expansion. Our results also show that firm age negatively moderates the relationship between international knowledge acquisition and entrepreneurial growth via the introduction of new products or services. Specifically, international knowledge acquisition has a positive effect on growth via new products/services development in young firms, but a negative effect in mature firms. We assume this reflects changes over time in how international knowledge is managed.

  • 18.
    Perez-Luño, Ana
    et al.
    Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla, Spain.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Valle Cabrera, Ramón
    Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla, Spain.
    The dual nature of innovative activity: How Entrepreneurial Orientation influences innovation generation and adoption2011In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 555-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes two modes of innovation that differ in their scope of newness — innovation generation and adoption. Building a theoretical model based on the Entrepreneurial Orientation literature and utilizing a unique sample of innovating firms, we find that 54% adopt innovations of other firms, 7% generate innovations internally whereas 39% combine the two. We also find that proactivity and risk taking influence the number of innovations generated and the extent to which firms favor generation over adoption and that environmental dynamism moderates one of these relationships. These findings add to the innovation and Entrepreneurial Orientation literatures.

  • 19.
    Shepherd, Dean A.
    et al.
    Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, USA.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Haynie, J. M.
    Department of Entrepreneurship and Emerging Enterprises, Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, USA.
    Moving forward: Balancing the financial and emotional costs of business failure2009In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 134-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do owner-managers delay business failure when it is financially costly to do so? In this paper we acknowledge that delaying business failure can be financially costly to the owner-manager and the more costly the delay, the more difficult the recovery. But we complement this financial perspective by introducing the notion of anticipatory grief as a mechanism for reducing the level of grief triggered by the failure event, which reduces the emotional costs of business failure. We propose that under some circumstances delaying business failure can help balance the financial and emotional costs of business failure to enhance an owner-manager's overall recovery — some persistence may be beneficial to recovery and promote subsequent entrepreneurial action.

  • 20.
    Wennberg, Karl
    et al.
    Imperial College London.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    DeTienne, Dawn R
    Colorado State University.
    Cardon, Melissa S
    Pace University.
    Reconceptualizing entrepreneurial exit: Divergent exit routes and their drivers2010In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 361-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We develop a conceptual model of entrepreneurial exit which includes exit through liquidation and firm sale for both firms in financial distress and firms performing well. This represents four distinct exit routes. In developing the model, we complement the prevailing theoretical framework of exit as a utility-maximizing problem among entrepreneurs with prospect theory and its recent applications in liquidation of investment decisions. We empirically test the model using two Swedish databases which follow 1,735 new ventures and their founders over eight years. We find that entrepreneurs exit from both firms in financial distress and firms performing well. In addition, commonly examined human capital factors (entrepreneurial experience, age, education) and failure-avoidance strategies (outside job, reinvestment) differ substantially across the four exit routes, explaining some of the discrepancies in earlier studies.

  • 21.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Baker, Ted
    Shepherd, Dean
    The age-effect of financial indicators as buffers against the liability of newness2010In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 423-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper builds on the liabilities of newness literature to suggest that accounting information is important for new firms. Using a sample of over 30,000 companies followed during their first 7 years of existence, we find evidence that financial indicators mitigate the liability of newness and that this buffering effect is stronger the younger the organization. These results represent three primary contributions to the literature. First, our conceptualization of accounting measures as indicators of external (creditworthiness enhancing legitimacy) as well as internal (targets for management) buffers to the liabilities of newness provides a novel way of viewing these constructs and explains why they are important to new firms despite their uncertainty and opacity. Second, we theoretically justify and empirically validate that these constructs are more important the younger the new firm is, which runs counter to the common wisdom of these constructs in the entrepreneurship literature. Third, we identify buffers against failure for new firms that are generalizable across industries.

  • 22.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Shepherd, D.A.
    Entrepreneurial orientation and small business performance: A Configurational Approach2005In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 71-91Article in journal (Refereed)
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