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  • 1.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    To sell or not to sell: Overweight users’ effect on fashion assortments2010In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 66-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. Fashion companies disagree. Despite the controversy, actual research has been scarce. This study compares the sizes of clothes that the four leading mass-marketing fashion retailers in Sweden offer to the body sizes of the population. Although branding theory would support the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands, such practices were not evident. The main contribution of this article is that it provides the first quantified empirical evidence on the theory of typical user imagery. In the discussion, it is posited that, although mass-market fashion brands should be susceptible to negative user imagery related to overweight and obese users, the companies avoid such problems by making garments that are not directly attributable to a specific brand, thus mitigating the negative effect of overweight and obese user imagery.

  • 2. Anisimova, Tatiana
    Corporate brand: The company-customer misalignment and its performance implications2010In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 488-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fit or co-alignment between company and customer perspectives is an important theoretical proposition in corporate branding theory. Utilizing three corporate brands in the Australian automobile industry, this research conceptualizes co-alignment as profile deviation and examines the effects of deviation from the company-specified corporate brand on customer loyalty and satisfaction. Management practice tells us that organizations invest significant resources to encourage customer satisfaction and loyalty. From the comparison of congruence models, this study demonstrates that in addition to the quantum of spend, alignment of company and customer corporate brand perspectives can be an important source of customer satisfaction and loyalty. The ideal corporate brand, as specified by senior management was used as a benchmark. The corporate brand construct included corporate associations, corporate personality and customer benefits. The results, which were robust across three corporate brands, generally support the hypotheses of negative performance impact of company-customer misalignment. However, positive performance implications of customer deviation on corporate personality suggest that the effects of misalignment are complex and that it is useful to explore corporate brand dimensions individually.

  • 3.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Invented corporate heritage brands2023In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 30, p. 157-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the phenomenon of invented corporate heritage brands, i.e. heritage that is made up, exaggerated or far-fetched, to an extent that stakeholders may challenge its accuracy. Along six empirical cases, three dimensions characterizing invented heritage are identified, namely facticity, historical connectedness/disconnectedness, and temporal expansion/contraction. Companies draw on three different strategies to build invented corporate heritage brands: The appropriation strategy builds a heritage brand by leveraging the past of organizations that are forerunners of the present firm The forgetting strategy omits or tones down parts of the past that are deemed as not being useful for the brand. Eventually, the fantasizing strategy constructs a brand based on a purely invented past. Overall, the article provides evidence of the high degree of pragmatic flexibility (Burghausen and Balmer in Corporate Communications: an International Journal 19: 384–402, 2014a) inherent in corporate heritage. It also demonstrates how young brands can be infused with heritage, by appropriating the past of historical forerunners that are meaningfully connected to the brand.

  • 4.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Department of Industrial Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Measuring brand experiences cross-nationally2017In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 86-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for reliable and valid metrics for tracking consumers' experiences of products and brands cross-nationally is becoming ever more important as companies are increasingly operating in international markets. Brand experiences associated with global brands can manifest themselves very differently in different parts of the world; thus, the scales developed to track brand experiences should be validated cross-nationally. This research tests and revises an existing brand experience measurement scale cross-nationally in two countries that have very different cultural settings. Based on the findings from a survey with a sample of 1008 respondents, the authors propose a revised and shortened scale that provides more reliable and valid measurement results of brand experiences of global high-tech brands. In general, the results demonstrate the need for tests on the cross-national applicability of measurement scales and, even further, they underline the importance of replication research.

  • 5.
    Sasinovskaya, Olga
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    From brand awareness to online co-design: How a small bathroom provider turned interactive on the web2011In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of virtual communities in marketing development and brand management is gaining growing attention both from scholars and practitioners. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs[1]) often lack organizational readiness and pre-adoption awareness related to new tools available online. This article presents an in-depth case study on how a small company transforms itself into an interactive platform on the web from merely a provider of online information to help customers participate actively in bathroom design. Online design community hosted by the small bathroom supplier combines social network features and toolkits for 3D bathroom design, attracting both hobbyists and professionals. The study shows that the company benefits from the its move to interactivity with the community perceiving and providing a brand strengthening tool. However, the study also shows relative reluctance on the part of the company towards exploiting the full range of possibilities available online.

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