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  • 1.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Book review: Fernando G. Alberti, Salvatore Sciascia, Carmine Tripodi and Federico Visconti, Entrepreneurial Growth in Industrial Districts: Four Italian Cases, Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, 2008; 269 pp.: 9781847200853, £69.00 (hbk)2010In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 428-430Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Women and entrepreneurship: Contemporary classics2006In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 661-664Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Book Review: Mary Barrett and Ken Moores, Women in Family Business Leadership Roles. Daughters on the Stage2012In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 101-103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Book review: Silke Scheer:The entrepreneur as business leader: Cognitive leadership in the firm2010In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 531-532Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 5.
    Chirico, Francesco
    University of Lugano, Switzerland.
    Knowledge accumulation in family firms: evidence from four case studies2008In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 433-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to make a contribution to the understanding of how knowledge can be accumulated in family business. Four family firms from Switzerland and Italy are part of this research. Existing literature combined with the case studies analysed lead to the development of a model that outlines factors responsible for knowledge accumulation viewed as an `enabler of longevity' in family business.The relationships depicted in the model can be read by researchers as hypotheses and suggestions for further research, and by managers as possible factors needed to accumulate knowledge in order to be successful across generations.

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  • 6.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    University of Lugano / Texas A&M University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Dynamic capabilities and trans-generational value creation in family firms: The role of organizational culture2010In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 487-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While some research on entrepreneurship in family businesses has focused on transgenerational value creation, a gap exists in understanding how such value is generated across generations. The present research offers insights through the lens of dynamic capabilities, which are created by knowledge and in turn generate entrepreneurial performance and value creation. A model is built based on literature and case research. The crucial role of the organizational culture emerges through the empirical study. Family inertia is considered to be a factor preventing the creation of dynamic capabilities. We find that family inertia depends on characteristics of the family business culture, where paternalism and entrepreneurial orientation influence family inertia positively and negatively, respectively. Family firms from Switzerland and Italy active in the beverage industry represent the empirical context. Theoretical and practical implications are offered.

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    fulltext
  • 7.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hunter, Erik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University.
    Institutional forces: The invisible hand that shapes venture ideas?2006In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 115-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutional theory is employed for examining how and to what extent external pressure leads to changes in the venture idea during the start-up and early life of new, knowledge-intensive ventures. From a population of 321 young, knowledge-intensive firms that underwent a training program at Linkping University, Sweden, structured telephone interview data were obtained from 167 firms. The results confirmed that the venture idea had undergone more change in ventures that had more external owners, a dominant customer, and an incubator location. The results imply that institutional theory is a meaningful tool for understanding why and how venture ideas change over time.

  • 8.
    De Clercq, D.
    et al.
    Brock University, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Martin, B.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    The roles of learning orientation and passion for work in the formation of entrepreneurial intention2013In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 652-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to extend understanding of the drivers that underlie entrepreneurial intention formation, this article investigates the hitherto underexplored roles of people's learning orientation and passion for work. It considers how these personal characteristics may moderate the instrumentality of their perceived ability to become a successful entrepreneur, and perceptions of the attractiveness of becoming an entrepreneur. Using a survey of 946 university students, it finds that learning orientation and passion for work invigorate the role of these feasibility and desirability considerations in enhancing entrepreneurial intention. A follow-up analysis reveals that the moderating effects of learning orientation and passion for work on the perceived attractiveness-entrepreneurial intention relationship are stronger to the extent that people value the intrinsic goal of autonomy in their future career more, but these moderating effects are immune to the importance of the extrinsic goal of earning financial rewards. Several implications for research and practice emerge.

  • 9.
    Díaz García, María-Cristina
    et al.
    Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Spain.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Gender identities and practices: interpreting women entrepreneurs' narratives2013In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 384-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that the discourse on womanhood is in conflict with that of entrepreneurship. This qualitative study examines how women construct their identities differently, finding that some of them perceive dissonance between womanhood and entrepreneurship discourses whereas others do not. The results indicate specific ways of constructing gender identity which result in gendered practices: how women act as entrepreneurs by ‘doing’ and ‘redoing’ gender. Since identity construction is contextually produced, other variables intersect with gender in establishing women’s status position. Women with higher status, engage in ‘redoing’ gender, trying to add value to it. The results offer new insights for those interested in promoting women entrepreneurs, by illustrating how gendered practices are used as strategic devices in doing business. In this regard, we argue that stories concerning women’s repertoire of business practices allow us to challenge the taken-for-granted assumptions of gender neutrality regarding typical business behaviour and entrepreneurship.

  • 10.
    Henry, Colette
    et al.
    Dundalk Inst Technol, Dept Business Studies, Dundalk, Ireland..
    Coleman, Susan
    Univ Hartford, Finance, Hartford, CT USA..
    Foss, Lene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Sch Business & Econ, Entrepreneurship & Innovat, Tromso, Norway.
    Orser, Barbara J.
    Univ Ottawa, Telfer Sch Management, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Brush, Candida G.
    Babson Coll, Entrepreneurship, Babson Pk, MA 02157 USA..
    Richness in diversity: Towards more contemporary research conceptualisations of women's entrepreneurship2021In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 609-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyses of the diversity of women entrepreneurs and their enterprises, using novel approaches and theoretical viewpoints, is lacking in contemporary scholarship. Accordingly, this article reviews and critiques five articles that constitute this Special Issue (SI) focused on exploring the diversity of women's entrepreneurship. The authors acknowledge that entrepreneurship is a rich and multi-coloured tapestry, hence, these SI articles highlight the complexities of women entrepreneurs and celebrate their diversity through signposting towards research conceptualisations that reflect the actual rather than the assumed status quo. The article contributes to extant scholarship by platforming the heterogeneity of women's entrepreneurial endeavours, supporting the view that in terms of supporting women's entrepreneurship, 'one size (still) does not fit all'. We also propose a framework to help future scholars strengthen the quality and relevance of their research on women entrepreneurs along four key dimensions: influence of context; theoretical development; multiplicity of dimensions; and heterogeneity.

  • 11.
    Henry, Colette
    et al.
    University of Tromsø, Norway.
    Foss, Lene
    University of Tromsø, Norway.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Gender and entrepreneurship research: A review of methodological approaches2016In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 217-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the findings of a systematic literature review (SLR) of the gender and entrepreneurship literature published in 18 journals over a 30-year period. The SLR sought to identify methodological trends in the field of gender and entrepreneurship and to criticallyexplore the type of methodological innovations needed in future scholarship. Findings reveal aproliferation of large-scale empirical studies focused on male/female comparisons, often with little detail provided on industry sector or sampling methods and with either a weak or no feminist perspective. We argue that future scholars must develop the methodological repertoire to match emerging trends towards post-structural feminist approaches; this may require a radical move towards more innovative, in-depth qualitative methodologies such as life histories, case study or discourse analysis.

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  • 12.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Book Review of Simon C. Parker, The Economics of Entrepreneurship2011In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 295-298Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Minola, Tommaso
    et al.
    Univ Bergamo, Dept Management Informat & Prod Engn DIGIP, Via Pasubio 7b, I-24044 Bergamo, Italy.;Univ Bergamo, Ctr Young & Family Enterprise CYFE, Via Pasubio 7b, I-24044 Bergamo, Italy..
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Brumana, Mara
    Univ Bergamo, Ctr Young & Family Enterprise CYFE, Via Pasubio 7b, I-24044 Bergamo, Italy.;Univ Bergamo, Dept Management Informat & Prod Engn, Bergamo, Italy..
    De Massis, Alfredo
    Free Univ Bozen Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy.;IMD Business Sch, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Univ Lancaster, Lancaster, England.;Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Under which circumstances do family SMES achieve high growth?: A behavioural perspective2022In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 768-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-growth firms contribute disproportionately to the creation of employment, wealth and economic development on a global basis. Yet, knowledge of the circumstances under which such growth patterns occur is limited, and the findings with regard to small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are inconclusive. Adopting the behavioural agency model, we analyse the effect of family control and related nuances (i.e. degree of family ownership and presence of a family chief executive officer (CEO)) on SME growth. Furthermore, we argue that the type of slack resources and their availability are a crucial organisational contingency when investigating high growth in SMEs. Using a sample of 39,631 European SMEs over a 13-year period, we find that family firms are less likely to achieve high growth compared to non-family firms; having a family CEO further reduces this likelihood. Instead, at higher (vs lower) levels of family ownership, the probability of family firms achieving high growth increases. Furthermore, the availability of high- and low-discretion slack resources influences these relationships. Our study advances current understanding of high growth in general, and family firms in particular.

  • 14.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Book Review: Prashantham Shameen, The Internationalization of Small Firms: A Strategic Entrepreneurship Perspective2009In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 646-656Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Review of Gordon E. Shockley, Peter M. Frank and Roger R Stough (eds.) (2008) Non-market entrepreneurship: interdisciplinary approaches and Zieger, R. (ed.) (2009) An introduction to social entrepreneurship: voices, preconditions, contexts2010In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 424-426Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Understanding strategy processes in family firms: Exploring the roles of actors and arenas2012In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 24-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to an increased understanding of how strategy processes unfold in family firms by integrating literature on strategy-as-practice and family business strategy. By relying on in-depth case research exploring three small and medium-sized family firms, and by drawing on notions of strategic actors and arenas from the strategy-as-practice literature, the article introduces the concepts of the Simmelian stranger and hybrid arena. These concepts help researchers and practitioners to achieve a richer understanding of how strategy processes unfold in the daily interactions that constitute the strategic work of family firms.

  • 17.
    Shu, Chengli
    et al.
    Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.
    Liu, Jinxin
    Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.
    Zhao, Mengli
    Xi’an Jiaotong University, China.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Proactive environmental strategy and firm performance: The moderating role of corporate venturing2020In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 654-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how two types of proactive environmental strategies (PESs) – proactive green management and green political influence – affect firm performance directly and under varying conditions characterising corporate venturing activities (domestic versus international). The results obtained by analysing a multi-informant dataset reveal that proactive green management has a stronger positive impact on firm performance than green political influence does. Moreover, international venturing has a greater positive moderating effect than domestic venturing on the link between proactive green management and firm performance, whereas, domestic venturing has a stronger positive moderating effect than international venturing on the relationship between green political influence and firm performance. This article contributes by differentiating between two important forms of corporate venturing, by distinguishing two important types of PESs and by offering a more granular framework for aligning corporate venturing activities with PESs. 

  • 18. Smallbone, D.
    et al.
    Welter, Friederike
    The Role of Government in SME Development in Transition Countries2001In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Smallbone, David
    et al.
    Kingston University.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). IfM Bonn & University of Siegen.
    Ateljevic, Jovo
    University of Banja Luca.
    Entrepreneurship in emerging market economies: Contemporary issues and perspectives2014In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 113-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship increasingly is becoming a global phenomenon, although its nature, extent and contribution to economic development varies according to the context in which it occurs. However, most of the conceptual development in the field of entrepreneurship has occurred in, or assumed, mature market conditions. This short introduction critically evaluates why we need to study other contexts such as emerging markets, and outlines the topics of the articles in the special issue.

  • 20.
    van Helvert-Beugels, J.
    et al.
    Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Flören, R.
    Nyenrode Business Universiteit, Netherlands.
    Managing tensions as paradox in CEO succession: The case of nonfamily CEO in a family firm2020In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 211-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of family firms choose to select a nonfamily CEO for the highest executive office. However, appointing a nonfamily CEO in a family firm tends to give rise to tensions that need to be managed for effective work relationships between the nonfamily CEO and the family owners. We draw on insights from the paradox literature to better understand these tensions and how they are managed. We performed real-time, in-depth longitudinal research into one family firm, which appointed a nonfamily CEO, and studied tensions in the work relationships between the nonfamily CEO and the family owners for a period of three years. We identified tensions arising in four specific areas after the transition from a family to a nonfamily CEO: professionalisation, collaboration, resource allocation and role transition. We found new insights regarding how an advisory board can provide support for the family owners in building work relationships with the nonfamily CEO, which makes the tensions salient and possible to manage through a paradox approach. These results inform a perspective of paradox management that shows by whom and how the different tensions are managed, that is, through changes in behaviour and/or through changes in the underlying subsystems of the family firm.

  • 21.
    Weiss, Jan F.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Shirokova, Galina
    St. Petersburg University, Russia.
    The translation of entrepreneurial intention into start-up behaviour: The moderating role of regional social capital2019In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 473-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the moderating role of regional social capital in the intention–behaviour link in entrepreneurship. We investigate to what extent the regional social capital context in which aspiring entrepreneurs are embedded strengthens or weakens the translation of individual entrepreneurial intentions into new venture creation activities. Our results suggest that the intention–behaviour link is weakened by cognitive regional social capital in the form of regional hierarchy values and strengthened by structural regional capital in the form of regional cultural diversity and regional breadth of associational activity, as well as by relational regional social capital in the form of high levels of regional generalised trust. Our findings suggest that to support new venture creation activity, there is a need to grow regional social capital via the enhancement of social trust, associational activities and regional cultural diversity – and at the same time decrease hierarchical social structures within regions.

  • 22.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    All you need is trust? A critical review of the trust and entrepreneurship literature2012In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 193-212Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article critically reviews the literature pertaining to trust and entrepreneurship, highlighting the diversity and complexity of this construct. In addition, the interdependency of trust with context, as well as its dual nature in relation to control and as a sanctioning mechanism, is explored. Trust can be both a dispositional and a behavioural outcome; ‘genuine’ (personal) trust, sanctions and control coexist and co-evolve within and across different contexts. Trust influences entrepreneurship, not always positively, but entrepreneurial behaviour also has an impact on levels of personal and institutional trust. Future studies of trust and entrepreneurship need to acknowledge the bright and dark sides of trust, its duality and the different contexts in which it occurs. Ultimately, we need to develop a far more critical analysis of the importance and role of trust in the context of entrepreneurship.

  • 23.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Book Review: Rethinking enterprise policy: Can failure trigger new understanding?2011In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 29, p. 733-734Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Entrepreneurship: New Perspectives in a Global Age: edited by Anne de Bruin and Ann Dupuis.2005In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 104-107Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Restructuring Regional and Local Economies: Towards a Comparative Study of Scotland and Upper Silesia: edited by George Blazyca2004In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 319-322Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Social Capital and Business Development in High-Technology Clusters2009In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 26 of 26
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