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  • 1.
    Hasselgren, Anton
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Peltomäki, J.
    Stockholm Business School, Sweden.
    Graham, M.
    University of Stellenbosch Business School, South Africa.
    Speculator activity and the cross-asset predictability of FX returns2020In: International Review of Financial Analysis, ISSN 1057-5219, E-ISSN 1873-8079, Vol. 72, article id 101561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper tests the gradual information diffusion hypothesis, which suggests that information spreads gradually across asset markets, to explain the role of speculator activity in the cross-asset return predictability of foreign exchange (FX) market strategies. We argue that the activity of speculators increase the rate of information diffusion across asset markets. Hence, we expect the predictive effect from the equity and commodity markets on FX market strategies to be weaker when speculators are active in the FX market. Our results show that, when speculator activity is high, the equity market's ability to predict the FX market dissipates, but not to the same extent as for the commodity market. Our findings suggest that speculators play a vital role in enhancing informational efficiency in the FX market.

  • 2.
    Kara, Alper
    et al.
    Univ Huddersfield, Business Sch, Huddersfield, W Yorkshire, England..
    Zhou, Haoyong
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Zhou, Yifan
    Univ Leicester, Sch Business, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Achieving the United Nations' sustainable development goals through financial inclusion: A systematic literature review of access to finance across the globe2021In: International Review of Financial Analysis, ISSN 1057-5219, E-ISSN 1873-8079, Vol. 77, article id 101833Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Access to credit may have a direct effect on achieving United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in ending poverty, improving health and education, and reducing inequality. In this paper, we systematically review the growing empirical evidence on whether individuals' demographic characteristics (such as gender and race) and socio-economic features (such as income and education) effect their ability in accessing credit. Our survey covers peer-reviewed articles providing empirical evidence, using quantitative and qualitative data, published between 2000 and 2020 (February). We find that having more education and/or being more financially literate increases households' and entrepreneurs' access to credit. Individuals with lower income and less wealth are less likely to obtain credit from the mainstream financial institutions. In emerging countries, women are more likely to be rejected and deprived from formal credit, and pay higher cost. Non-Whites, ethnic minorities, disabled people and immigrants are also more likely to be excluded from the formal credit markets. We find that abovementioned credit deprived segments of the society resort to fringe finance providers, such as pay-day lenders or pawnbrokers, with higher costs. These findings are remarkably similar across developed and developing countries. Finally, we provide direction for further research in achieving SDGs through financial inclusion and access to credit by highlighting various shortcomings of the existing literature and empirical evidence.

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