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  • 1.
    Albertzeth, Gustav
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Pujawan, I. Nyoman
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Tjahjono, Benny
    Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Mitigating transportation disruptions in a supply chain: a cost-effective strategy2019In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation disruptions can be damaging to a supply chain because goods may not arrive on time and this jeopardises the service level to the customers. While supply chain disruptions have gained significant attention from scholars, little has been done to explore these disruptions in the context of transportation. The study described in this paper aims to address disruptions occurring in the transportation of goods from a plant to a distribution centre. We modelled this real case to obtain insights on the effectiveness of different strategies to mitigate transportation disruptions. We evaluated four mitigation strategies and compared the outcomes in terms of service level and total costs: (1) the risk acceptance strategy, (2) the redundant stock strategy, (3) the flexible route strategy, and (4) the redundant-flexibility strategy. The results suggest that the best strategy differs depending on the budget that managers are willing to deploy to improve the service level. The simulation experiments and the use of the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) would be instrumental in helping decision makers in selecting the best disruption mitigation strategies where the best option would likely be different under varying circumstances. 

  • 2.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Integrating logistics into the outsourcing process2009In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 281-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a general outsourcing process was derived from the literature; important areas of logistics to be considered during an outsourcing process were then categorised and related to this process. The process was applied to empirical data from three companies. All three companies included all phases of the general outsourcing process in their outsourcing projects. The derived process thereby mirrors how these companies work with outsourcing projects. This makes it possible for other companies to use the process. The companies included logistics considerations in their processes but lacked a conscious focus on logistics. Using the general process including logistics would reduce the possibility of overlooking important considerations during outsourcing projects and decrease the problems discovered after implementation. An improved and more systemised outsourcing process would also probably decrease the time necessary for outsourcing projects. Further research should include studies of ongoing outsourcing projects, using the general outsourcing process including logistics.

  • 3.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Introducing a Customer Order Decoupling Zone in Logistics Decision-Making2005In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 211-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim of this paper is to explore the properties of the so-called customer order decoupling point (CODP) to enhance the knowledge and understanding of its possible use in operations and logistics. More specifically, the purpose is to enhance the applicability of the CODP framework so that it also covers scenarios with a gradual increase in certainty concerning information about customer demand. Differentiating between decisions made under certainty and decisions made under uncertainty of customer demand has been identified as a key issue in operations strategy and supply chain management. The CODP identifies this distinction but the concept is limited in that it assumes either total uncertainty or total certainty concerning customer demand. Acknowledging a gradual increase in certainty across multiple independent dimensions provides a point of departure for extending the decoupling point to a decoupling zone. Based on the decoupling zone, we extend the established framework for positioning the CODP and identify eight key decisions related to the decoupling zone that concern positioning, fulfilment strategies and buffer sizing.

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