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  • 1. Anderson, R. B.
    et al.
    Camp II, R. D.
    Dana, L. P.
    Honig, Benson
    Faculty of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, West Waterloo, ON, Canada.
    Nkongolo-Bakenda, J. -M
    Peredo, A. M.
    Indigenous land rights in Canada: The foundation for development2005In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 104-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the middle decades of the 20th Century Indigenous people were the target of efforts to assist in economic development. In large part these externally developed, modernisation based efforts failed. In response, a second wave of Indigenous development has emerged; one in which Indigenous peoples are striving to rebuild their 'nations' and improve their lot through economic development 'on their own terms'. Key to this approach is the pursuit by Indigenous people of the recognition of their rights to their traditional lands and resources. This paper examines the emergence of this second wave of Indigenous development in Canada.

  • 2.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Wigren, Caroline
    Isaacs, Eslyn
    Visser, Kobus
    Ethnic entrepreneurship in a multicultural context: regional development and the unintended lock-in effects2009In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 449-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on South Africa, the home country for several ethnic groups. In this article ethnic entrepreneurship refers to people who share a common national background with some shared culture and who perceive themselves, and are perceived by others as separate (Waldinger et al., 1990; Yinger, 1998). The purpose is to illustrate how ethnicity driven laws and directives formed by a government that has "bought into" the Western discourse of entrepreneurship and a traditional view on ethnic entrepreneurship create lock-in effects on the individual as well as on the societal levels. Contrasting these views with ethnic groups as social organizations and the three perspectives of culture as integration, as differentiation, and as fragmentation we fulfill our purpose. The South African context is introduced to the reader and the paper ends with a discussion where lock-in effects of ethnic entrepreneurship are brought up: institutional factors, loss of knowledge; a subcultural exchange, a transfer of the Western discourse of entrepreneurship and the lack of a Barthian change agent representing the fragmentation perspective.

  • 3.
    Ettl, Kerstin
    et al.
    School of Economic Disciplines, University of Siegen.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    How female entrepreneurs learn and acquire (business relevant) knowledge2010In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 65-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is still a gender gap in entrepreneurship, with only 30% of all business founders being women. One important question in this regard concerns how female entrepreneurs learn and acquire business-relevant knowledge. Individual learning processes are affected by individual sense making and cognitions, implying that amongst the other factors at the individual and environmental levels, gender is a factor influencing entrepreneurial learning. However, a gender perspective has been neglected in recent research on entrepreneurial learning and opportunity recognition. The paper concentrates on conceptually and empirically introducing this gender perspective. We explore the main influences on the entrepreneurial learning of female entrepreneurs and the determinants and triggers that impact female learning. Regarding the implications for entrepreneurship research, we hope to contribute to the understanding of what constitutes the specificities of female entrepreneurship in the frame of entrepreneurial learning and opportunity recognition.

  • 4.
    Evansluong, Quang
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The role of family social capital in immigrants’ entrepreneurial opportunity creation processes2017In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hunter, Erik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Celebrity Entrepreneurship: Communication Effectiveness through Perceived Involvement2007In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 505-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Increasingly, celebrities appear not only as endorsers for products but are apparently involved in entrepreneurial roles—as initiators, part owners and/or in managerial capacities—in the ventures that market the products they promote. We call this phenomenon Celebrity Entrepreneurship. Whether or not this type of involvement on the part of the celebrity is original and genuine, it may be suspected that celebrity entrepreneurs are more effective communicators than typical celebrity endorsers. This research hypothesizes that such is the case. Further, we hypothesize that this is because celebrity entrepreneurship leads to higher perceptions of a source’s Involvement—an endorser quality hitherto neglected in the marketing communication literature—which in turn affects traditional outcome variables such as Aad (Attitude toward the ad) and Abr (Attitude towards the brand). Based on two experiments using subjects from the relevant product target group (n=88 and n=77) we tested their reactions to advertisements containing the celebrity Cameron Diaz after exposure to one of three experimental conditions: entrepreneur; mere endorser, and no information (control). The results confirm that a) involvement can successfully be operationalized as distinct from variables previously shown to influence communicator effectiveness (trustworthiness, attractiveness and expertise), b) involvement has a positive effect on Aad and Abr over and above the traditional predictors and control variables, and c) the celebrity entrepreneur condition in the experimental manipulation leads to increased perceived involvement.

  • 6.
    Minola, Tommaso
    et al.
    Center for Young and Family Enterprise, and Department of Economics and Technology Management, University of Bergamo, Italy.
    Cassia, Lucio
    Center for Young and Family Enterprise, and Department of Economics and Technology Management, University of Bergamo, Italy.
    Criaco, Guiseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Financing patterns in new technology-based firms: an extension of the pecking order theory2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 212-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding financial strategies and patterns of new firms is crucial to the theoretical unravelling of the entrepreneurial process as well as to the elaboration of appropriate support programs from practitioner and policymaker. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether a pecking order theory underlies the financing strategies of new technology-based firms (NTBFs). From the analysis of previous literature on the subject, controversial results emerge: while some authors have confirmed a traditional pecking order theory for NTBFs, others, on grounds of NTBFs major financial constraints derived from higher information asymmetry, have proposed a revised pecking order, where access to equity (in particular private equity) occurs prior to debt. This research has been carried out applying an approach based on estimation ofinternal financial gap (Cosh et al., ECOJ 119:71494-1533, 2009) using data from the Kauffman Firm Survey. Additionally, we extend the pecking orderprediction by examining the effect of human capital as determinants for financing decisions, given its crucial role in shaping entrepreneurial dynamics of NTBFs. Our results support the existence of a revised pecking order in the case of NTBFs; moreover entrepreneur’s age and experience play a role in clarifying financial priorities of NTBFs.

  • 7. Peredo, A. M.
    et al.
    Anderson, R. B.
    Galbraith, C. S.
    Honig, Benson
    Faculty of Business and Economics, Wilfred Laurier University, Canada.
    Dana, L. P.
    Towards a theory of indigenous entrepreneurship2004In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 1, no 1-2, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous populations throughout the world suffer from chronic poverty, lower education levels, and poor health. The 'second wave' of indigenous development, after direct economic assistance from outside, lies in indigenous efforts to rebuild their 'nations' and improve their lot through entrepreneurial enterprise. This paper suggests that there is a distinguishable kind of activity appropriately called 'indigenous entrepreneurship'. We begin by defining the indigenous population and noting some general facts about their numbers and distribution. In an effort to discern the potential for development on indigenous peoples' own terms, we then explore three frameworks for understanding efforts at development, including indigenous development: modernisation theory, dependency theory and (at somewhat greater length) regulation theory. After distinguishing 'indigenous' from 'ethnic' entrepreneurship, we conclude by identifying a number of lead questions that present themselves at the outset of an enquiry into the nature of indigenous entrepreneurship.

  • 8.
    Pio, Edwina
    et al.
    School of Business and Law, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Teaching ethnic minority entrepreneurship through parables2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 154-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnic minority entrepreneurship operates in increasingly complex and ambiguous environments. Thus there is the need for entrepreneurship educators to prepare students to handle ambiguity and to develop a more comprehensive, contextualised and individualised understanding of ethnic minority entrepreneurship. In this paper, we present parables as a pedagogical tool to facilitate an understanding of ethnic minority entrepreneurship through the embracing and tackling of ambiguity by students. This is done through student interviews conducted with immigrant entrepreneurs in Sweden, followed by the construction of parables based on the interviews. The liberatory type of pedagogy where the student is the storyteller highlights multiple layers of meaning, including power, hegemony and exploitation in the interpretation and teaching about ethnic minority entrepreneurship. Such parable pedagogy encourages entrepreneurship educators to give more emphasis to ethnic minority entrepreneurship in the content and design of their curriculum.

  • 9. Smallbone, D.
    et al.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Conceptualising Entrepreneurship in a Transition Context2005In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 190-206Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Entrepreneurship in West and East Germany2007In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 10 of 10
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
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