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  • 1.
    Bauweraerts, Jonathan
    et al.
    Université de Mons, Mons, Belgium.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    Università Carlo Cattaneo, Castellanza, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    Università IULM, Milan, Italy.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Family CEO and board service: Turning the tide for export scope in family SMEs2019In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 28, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adopting the socioemotional wealth perspective, we argue that the presence of a family CEO in family SMEs negatively affects export scope, but that such negative effect is mitigated by board service. We develop and test a model that considers the synergistic combination of family management and another important aspect of family governance in the context of family firm internationalization: the service behavior of the board of directors. The empirical evidence from a sample of 248 Belgian family SMEs shows that governance is crucial to overcoming the problems of family management: family CEOs may negatively influence export scope, but board service is able to turn the tide so that the family CEO effect becomes positive. With such novel findings, we contribute to international business and family business studies.

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  • 2.
    Cook, Gary
    et al.
    University of Liverpool Management School.
    Pandit, Naresh
    Norwich Business School.
    Lööf, Hans
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Geographic clustering and outward foreign direct investment2012In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1112-1121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses an important neglected question: To what extent do geographic clusters promote outward foreign direct investment (ODI)? We find evidence that clusters do promote ODI and so support Porter's argument that advantages gained in clusters can be the foundations of successful internationalisation. Digging deeper, we find that certain cluster incumbents promote more ODI than others, with more experienced firms and firms with stronger resource bases accounting for more ODI. We also find that firms located in clusters within major global nodes/cities engage in more ODI. Finally, we find that both localisation and urbanisation economies promote ODI. However, the former, within-industry effects, are more important. Overall, this study echoes Dunning's call for more focus on the ‘L’ component of the ownership, location, internalisation (OLI) paradigm and particularly on the advantages that reside in clusters that make them not only attractive destinations for foreign direct investment (FDI) but also fertile environments from which FDI can spring.

  • 3.
    Dong, Guowei
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Department of International Economics, Government and Business, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Kokko, Ari
    Copenhagen Business School, Department of International Economics, Government and Business, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Zhou, Haoyong
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Innovation and export performance of emerging market enterprises: The roles of state and foreign ownership in China2022In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 31, no 6, article id 102025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the role of ownership for the relationship between innovation and exports. Analyzing a large firm-level data set on Chinese manufacturing firms during 2000–2007, we find that state ownership has a positive moderating effect on the innovation–export relationship. We ascribe this effect to state-owned firms’ privileged access to complementary resources and networks that strengthen their ability to use innovation to generate exports. In contrast to many earlier studies, we also find that foreign ownership has a negative moderating effect. One likely reason is that indicators of local innovation do not reflect the flows of knowledge between foreign-owned firms and their parent companies. This finding highlights the fact that innovation and production may be geographically separated within multinational enterprises. A policy implication of the analysis is that public support to innovation is likely to have stronger effects on exports when it targets firms that carry out most of their activities in domestic market.

  • 4.
    Gammelgaard, Jens
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School.
    McDonald, Frank
    Bradford University School of Management.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Tüselmann, Heinz
    Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Dörrenbächer, Christoper
    Berlin School of Economics and Law.
    The impact of increases in subsidiary autonomy and network relationships on performance2012In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1158-1172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses network approaches to subsidiary theory to investigate the performance impacts of interactions among the factors of autonomy, intra-organizational network relationships, and inter-organizational network relationships. The paper offers an analysis of both direct and indirect interactions among these factors. This study develops and extends existing research that uses network-based approaches in studies of subsidiary performance by considering the roles of autonomy and network relationships. In addition, the study examines changes in terms of increases in the interactions between the main factors rather than the levels of these factors. The examination of the interactions between increases in autonomy and networks and the subsequent impact of this change on performance contributes to a better understanding of subsidiary evolution. The results, which are based on data gathered from a survey of 350 foreign-owned subsidiaries in the UK, Germany, and Denmark, reveal complex interactions between increases in autonomy and network relationships, and the subsequent impact of these changes on performance. The results also highlight the central role of inter-organizational network relationships in the interaction between the factors, which produce significant and positive effects.

  • 5.
    Gillmore, Edward
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Mandate dynamics and the importance of mandate loss for subsidiary evolution2022In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 31, no 6, article id 101994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides insights into the dynamics of mandate loss and subsidiary charter development through exploring two research questions on what the characteristics of subsidiary mandate loss are and what roles do intra-MNE actors have in subsidiary mandate loss? The paper is based on a qualitative study of 17 cases of subsidiary mandate losses. The data revealed four distinct patterns of mandate loss depending upon what phase of mandate development the subsidiary found itself: (1) mandate loss due to a combination of failure in the new mandate or a change in the external environment. (2) mandate loss due to competition with sister subsidiaries (3) Subsidiaries shed peripheral mandates to create space and focus on the core activities (4) mature mandate loss due to misfit between subsidiary skills and that of competition in the local market. This paper contributes to the subsidiary evolution literature by elucidating the multiplicity of subsidiary mandate loss and the “prime mover” involvement in mandate loss.

  • 6.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management.
    von Krogh, G.
    Yip, G.
    An epistemology of globalizing firms1994In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 395-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses two concepts in an emerging theory of knowledge development in globalizing firms. The concept of "language games" is developed to shed light on the role of language in globalizing organizations. The concept of "self-similarity" enables discussions of changes in routines, processes, and structures as firms evolve from national to global organizations. © 1995.

  • 7.
    Surana, Ankit
    et al.
    Macquarie Business School, Macquarie University, Australia.
    Chavan, Meena
    Macquarie Business School, Macquarie University, Australia.
    Kumar, Vikas
    University of Sydney Business School, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The internationalization process: A contextual analysis of Indian ibusiness firms2024In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, article id 102255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic world we live in requires that traditional international business theories be revisited to obtain insights into the internationalization of emerging market ibusiness firms (EMIFs). Research states that an ibusiness firm’s internationalization process is distinct and faster because users co-create content through interactions among themselves to generate value for the firm. However, it is unclear how EMIFs become credible global players within a short period despite being late arrivals in the market and having fewer resources. Drawing on insights from the linkage, leverage, and learning (LLL) framework, this research aims to understand the internationalization process of EMIFs from India by adopting a multiple case study–based approach whereby we conducted multiple in-depth interviews with 14 Indian ibusiness firms. This study contributes to the extant literature on ibusiness internationalization by developing a framework to advance our understanding of the internationalization process for EMIFs. Further, the study contributes to the LLL framework by offering novel additions to the three aspects of linkage, leverage, and learning, thereby, extending LLL framework to the ibusiness firms.

  • 8. von Krogh, G.
    et al.
    Roos, Johan
    Norwegian School of Management.
    "Knowledge in organizations, knowledge transfer and cooperative strategies" A word from the guest editors1994In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 331-335Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 8 of 8
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