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  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Location Attributes and Start-ups in Knowledge-Intensive Business Services2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 103-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ryan, Camille
    Faculty of Communication and Culture, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Phillips, Peter
    Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Comparing a pharmaceutical and an agro-food bioregion: On the importance of knowledge bases for socio-spatial patterns of innovation2006In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 393-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to compare the socio-spatial patterns of innovation and knowledge linkages of a biopharmaceutical and an agro-food biotech cluster. Dissimilarities can be expected based on differences in terms of historical technological regimes and sectoral innovation system dynamics between the agro-food and pharmaceutical industries in general and particularly the distinctive analytical (science-based) knowledge base of biopharmaceuticals in contrast with the more synthetic (engineering-based) knowledge base of agro-food biotechnology. Drawing on bibliometric data and case material the study compares two representative bioregions: a biopharmaceutical cluster in Scania, Sweden and an agro-food biotech cluster in Saskatoon, Canada. The empirical study supports the theoretical expectations and shows that knowledge dynamics in the agro-food cluster are more localized than in the biopharmaceuticals cluster. It is important, however, to acknowledge that these differences are relative. Both sectors display local and non-local patterns of collaboration following the general pattern for biotechnology.

  • 3.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Andersson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Knowledge in Regional Economic Growth: The Role of Knowledge Accessibility2007In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 129-149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lobo, Jose
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Stolarick, Kevin
    Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, Univeristy of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Strumsky, Deborah
    Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA.
    The Inventive, the Educated and the Creative: How Do They Affect Metropolitan Productivity?2014In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 155-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longstanding research tradition assumes that endogenous technological development increases regional productivity. It has been assumed that measures of regional patenting activity or human capital are an adequate way to capture the endogenous creation of new ideas that result in productivity improvements. This process has been conceived as occurring in two stages. First, an invention or innovation is generated, and then it is developed and commercialized to create benefits for the individual or firm owning the idea. Typically these steps are combined into a single model of the "invention in/productivity out" variety. Using data on Gross Metropolitan Product per worker and on inventors, educational attainment, and creative workers (together with other important socioeconomic controls), we unpack the model back to the two-step process and use a SEM modeling framework to investigate the relationships among inventive activity and potential inventors, regional technology levels, and regional productivity outcomes. Our results show almost no significant direct relationship between invention and productivity, except through technology. Clearly, the simplification of the "invention in/productivity out" model does not hold, which supports other work that questions the use of patents and patenting related measures as meaningful innovation inputs to processes that generate regional productivity and productivity gains. We also find that the most effective measure of regional inventive capacity, in terms of its effect on technology, productivity, and productivity growth is the share of the workforce engaged in creative activities.

  • 5.
    Lööf, Hans
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    R&D strategy, metropolitan externalities and productivity: Evidence from Sweden2014In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the influence of metropolitan externalities on productivity for different types of long-run R&D engagement based on information from the Community Innovation Survey. We apply a dynamic general method of moments model to a panel of manufacturing and service firms with different locations in Sweden, classified as a metropolitan region, the largest metropolitan region, a metropolitan city, the largest metropolitan city and a nonmetropolitan area. This analysis generates three distinct results. First, the productivity premium associated with persistent R&D is close to 8 per cent in nonmetro locations and about 14 per cent in the largest city. Second, a firm without any R&D engagement does not benefit at all from the external milieu in metro areas. Third, no productivity premium is associated with occasional R&D effort regardless of the firm's location.

  • 6.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Sack, Lionel
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Institutional stability and industry renewal: Diverging trajectories in the Cognac beverage cluster2016In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 448-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adding to approaches highlighting network dynamics as a basis for regional economic development, increased attention is paid to institutions as contextual factors contributing to explaining how and why economies change. Research has shown that firms tend to react differently to the same institutional configurations, with the main explanatory factors being their sectoral backgrounds and intra-firm characteristics. This study adds to these insights by examining a regional economy in France, that of Cognac, in which 300 firms are operating under homogeneous institutional preconditions. Despite these similarities, we identify different development trajectories from the 1990s onwards. Our observations illustrate how firms’ responses to external change diverge and bring them on different trajectories due to different positions in the industry hierarchy and different experiences and capabilities among individuals within firms. The study contributes to the better understanding of mechanisms of path dependence, which have gained wide recognition in the literature in the recent decades.

  • 7. Soete, Birgit
    et al.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Introduction: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Growth2004In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 161-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    Anisimova, Tatiana Anatolevena
    Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    The innovation and performance effects of well-designed environmental regulation: evidence from Sweden2018In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides novel empirical insights into the Porter hypothesis (PH) and its dynamic nature. The PH posits that well-designed environmental regulations induce eco-innovations at polluting firms that improve both their environmental and business performance via ‘innovation offsets.’ We conduct an econometric test of this proposition, using Swedish pulp and paper plants as empirical application. Swedish environmental regulation of polluting industries provides an interesting case because it has been praised, due to containing elements of ‘well-designed’ regulations, for being conducive to accomplishing the ‘win-win’ situation of mutual environmental and economic benefits. The empirical results indicate that flexible and dynamic command-and-control regulation and economic incentive instruments have induced innovation offsets through improved energy efficiency. Our study bears important implications: empirical tests of the PH that do not account for its dynamic nature, and that do not measure ‘well-designed’ regulations, might provide misleading conclusions as to its validity.

1 - 8 of 8
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