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  • 1. Bürgi, P.
    et al.
    Roos, Johan
    Imagination Lab, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Images of strategy2003In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Images underlying strategy tend to be simplistic, unimodal, visual abstractions. We suggest that multimodal imagery of strategy, which brings together verbal/narrative, visual/imagistic, and kinaesthetic/haptic nodes, can significantly enrich people's understanding of their organization and its strategy. © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Jantunen, Ari
    et al.
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, School of Business.
    Ellonen, Hanna-Kaisa
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, School of Business.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Beyond appearances - Do dynamic capabilities of innovative firms actually differ?2012In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 141-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic capabilities are the higher-order capabilities needed for changing operational-level capabilities and learning in new domains, and thus they are critical for innovation activities. The aim of this study is to explore heterogeneity of dynamic capabilities in a comparative setting. We chose four innovative case firms representing a single industry, namely magazine publishing. The similarity of the cases provided a solid foundation for comparing their dynamic capabilities. Based on the results it seems that the practices comprising sensing capabilities are likely to be similar across firms within a single industry, while practices comprising seizing and reconfiguring types of capabilities may differ more between companies. Thus dynamic capabilities have both idiosyncratic and common features across an industry. These findings are relevant to practicing managers in that they illustrate that competing companies within the same industry tend to develop similar types of practices to match the changing requirement of the operating environment. Hence, managers should not be falsely comforted by the current situation within their firms, but proactively develop their unique capabilities to gain advantage over their competitors.

  • 3. Krogh, G. V.
    et al.
    Roos, Johan
    Norwegian School of Management.
    Corporate divestiture and the phantom limb effect1994In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although corporate restructuring is a much-researched area in management literature, divestitures have not been discussed from the perspective of their negative effect on knowledge transfer and corporate performance. Georg von Krogh and Johan Roos examine this phenomenon in relation to the competence configuration of the firm, and suggest means by which corporate management can overcome these potentially negative outcomes. © 1994.

  • 4.
    Pittino, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Visintin, Francesca
    Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Udine, Udine, Italy.
    Lauto, Giancarlo
    Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Udine, Udine, Italy.
    A configurational analysis of the antecedents of entrepreneurial orientation2017In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 224-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial orientation is widely acknowledged as a strong predictor of firm performance. It is therefore critical to understand the factors and conditions that nurture it. In this paper, we investigate what configurations of motivations and personality traits trigger entrepreneurial orientation in three strategic leadership situations: successor of a family business, family-oriented founder, non-family founder. Strategic leaders in these situations are differently exposed to the opportunities and constraints to pursue entrepreneurial posture, because of the influence of family embeddedness and organizational resistance. We apply Fuzzy Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis to a sample of 257 Italian SME owner/managers. We identify 12 coherent configurations of internal and external motivations, and personality traits that are all conducive to entrepreneurial orientation. These configurations are consistent with features of the family and organization environments in which the entrepreneurial action takes place; furthermore, in each strategic leadership situation, different configurations of attributes lead to entrepreneurial orientation.

  • 5.
    Roos, Johan
    Intl. Inst. for Mgmt. Development, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Distinction making and pattern recognition in management1996In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 590-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to make new distinctions in management, and to diffuse these rapidly throughout a company into shared practices, will be a corporate strategic advantage in the future. Johan Roos justifies this view on the grounds that knowledge development provides the foundation for distinction making, and it is the management of this knowledge that provides the driver. The author argues it is the process of distinction making which is a conscious managerial process. He first discusses the art of making distinctions in general, and then focuses on a particular form of distinction making: pattern recognition. He concludes with three managerial actions that can be taken to enhance the pattern recognition capability of an organisation. Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 6.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    International Institute for Management Development (IMD), Switzerland.
    Victor, B.
    Towards a new model of strategy-making as serious play1999In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 348-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new model of strategy-making as play is presented in response to increasing calls for a deeper theory of strategy-making. First an elaboration of the construct of strategic imagination is offered, describing three distinct, but interrelated forms of imagination: descriptive, creative, and challenging. Strategic Imagination is defined as an emergent property of a complex interplay between the three kinds of imagination. Then, extending the work of the planning and design schools, the model describes the complex social dynamic of strategy-making itself. Applying the notion of play from anthropology and cognitive development, the strategy-making process is described as a three-phase play process. The three phases, constructing to stimulate new ideas, story telling to share meaning, and deep engagement to assimilate new directions, are described. Finally some directions for strategy-making practice improvement are offered.

  • 7.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management.
    Von Krogh, G.
    Figuring out your competence configuration1992In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 422-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Johan Roos and Georg von Krogh go beyond contemporary theories of firms' competitive advantages to point out that most firms compete on competencies, and therefore possession of competence is the key to success. Competence itself is simply the synthesis of a firm's particular task and knowledge systems. The authors explore the nature of these systems and argue that skilfully combining them gives a firm its 'competence configuration' which represents the time potential of the organization. © 1992.

  • 8.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    von Krogh, G
    Five Claims on Knowing1996In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 423-426Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Sheaffer, Zachary
    et al.
    Dept. of Economics and Management, Ariel University Centre, Ariel, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    Teresa Cascioli Chair in Entrepreneurial Leadership, DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Zionit, Shaul
    Dept. of Management and Economics, The Open University of Israel, Israel.
    Yeheskel, Orly
    School of Management and Economics, The Academic College of Tel-Aviv Jaffa, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Radical changes, ideology, dwindling membership and financial distress: A macro longitudinal study2011In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 291-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this longitudinal study we examine how core changes, dwindling membership and ideological embeddedness, lead to financial distress in a unique organizational setting: declining Israeli kibbutzim. We analyze six years of core changes and their effects on financial distress for 102 Israeli kibbutzim. The research is based on an organizational macro-temporal dataset where the same 40 changes were measured concurrently and consecutively in 270 kibbutzim. These changes range from incremental or tectonic, to radical, and cover a range of organizational facets. Results indicate that turnaround measures, including radical transformation of governance and remuneration policies, serve only to exacerbate rather than alleviate financial distress. Stronger ideological embeddedness was also found to aggravate financial distress.

  • 10.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Only a matter of chance? How firm performance measurement impacts study results2014In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 46-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although strategic management research is well aware of the importance of construct measurement, surprisingly little rigor is applied regarding its core concept, firm performance. Using the example of the resource-based view (RBV), this paper demonstrates how divergence between theory-building and construct measurement regarding firm performance can produce misleading conclusions. The RBV seeks to explain value creation in the marketplace, yet empirical studies often measure various aspects of firm financial performance. Building on appropriation theory, I show that it is not possible to infer to changes in firm value creation from observed changes in firm financial performance measures and vice versa due to an omitted variable bias: the neglect of the relative bargaining power of stakeholders. This paper derives conclusions for research practice and suggests theoretically meaningful ways of bridging the gap between value creation and firm financial performance in the RBV framework. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 11. Von Krogh, G.
    et al.
    Roos, Johan
    IMD, International Institute for Management Development, Switzerland.
    Conversation management1995In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 390-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies communicate internally through their own phrases and concepts - their own language. The local meaning of that language is very difficult to transpose into another company's language and culture. Georg von Krogh and Johan Roos point out that many businesses are careless in their use of language and internal conversations - yet nothing is of more importance to the company's strategy. These authors urge managers to develop their own internal company lexicon of language since language and knowledge development are interdependent. Most companies have mastery of operational conversations, but not of strategic conversations. This article sets out guidelines for managing and developing strategic conversations which are directed towards the future of the company. © 1995.

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