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  • 1.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media Management and Transformation Centre.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media Management and Transformation Centre.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    "Business growth": do practitioners and scholars really talk about the same thing?2010In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 289-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current growth literature has stalled over which measures to use in empirical studies, causing a fragmented theory base. This paper claims that there is a third issue that further curbs efforts in developing a better understanding of business growth. Based on a thorough literature review, a quantitative, and a qualitative study, we find that academic scholars and entrepreneurs do not talk about the same thing when they say “business growth.” For practitioners, growth is a more complex phenomenon — with a strong emphasis on internal development — which differs from the simplified conceptualization of growth used in empirical studies.

  • 2.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Why research on women entrepreneurs needs new directions2006In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 595-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research articles on women's entrepreneurship reveal, in spite of intentions to the contrary and in spite of inconclusive research results, a tendency to recreate the idea of women as being secondary to men and of women's businesses being of less significance or, at best, as being a complement. Based on a discourse analysis, this article discusses what research practices cause these results. It suggests new research directions that do not reproduce women's subordination but capture more and richer aspects of women's entrepreneurship.

  • 3.
    Arregle, Jean-Luc
    et al.
    EM Lyon Business School, Ecully, France.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA.
    Internationalization of Family-Controlled Firms: A Study of the Effects of External Involvement in Governance2012In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 1115-1143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research focuses on family-controlled firms as an important type of family firms, and demonstrates how external parties in the governance (ownership and board of directors) can serve as a catalyst for their internationalization. Our framework also embraces the moderating effects of the competitive environmental heterogeneity and past performance on the relationship between external, nonfamily involvement in governance, and internationalization (scale and scope). The hypotheses are tested on a sample of 351 Swedish family-controlled firms. Our findings extend previous research on family firms and their internationalization, especially addressing some of the prior mixed findings, and offers implications for both theory and practice.

  • 4.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sieger, Philipp
    University of St. Gallen & University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Eddleston, Kimberly A.
    D'Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University, USA.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Fail but try again? The effects of age, gender, and multiple-owner experience on failed entrepreneurs’ reentry2017In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 909-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate what leads failed entrepreneurs to reenter entrepreneurship by taking a developmental career perspective. Specifically, we hypothesize that the age of failed entrepreneurs has a non-linear relationship with the likelihood of reentering entrepreneurship that follows different career stages (early, middle, and late). The gender of failed entrepreneurs and multiple-owner experience in the failed firm are hypothesized to be moderators of this relationship. We test our hypotheses using a database consisting of the Swedish population, including 4,761 entrepreneurs who failed between 2000 and 2004. Analyzing their career paths over the years following their failure offers support for our theoretical expectations.

  • 6.
    Bruns, Volker
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Holland, Dan
    Shepherd, Dean
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    The role of human capital in loan officers' decision policies2008In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 485-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a human-capital perspective and the similarity-attraction paradigm, we examine the role of general and specific human capital in the decision policies of 114 Swedish loan officers in their assessments of small-business loan requests. We found that human capital characteristics had marginal impact on decision policy contingencies and that specific human capital had no significant influence on the probability of loan approval. However, we did find that the similarity between the loan officers’ human capital and the pplicants’ human capital was a significant indicator of loan approval. The findings offer interesting insight into the heterogeneity of loan decision processes and outcomes and future research opportunities are suggested.

  • 7.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Texas A&M University, Mays Business School, College Station, TX, USA.
    Ireland, Duane
    Texas A&M University, Mays Business School, College Station, TX, USA.
    Sirmon, David
    Texas A&M University, Mays Business School, College Station, TX, USA.
    Franchising and the family firm: creating unique sources of advantage through ‘familiness’2011In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 483-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paucity of research examining family firms engaged with franchising is surprising. We theorize about differences in franchising behavior between family and nonfamily firms and the relative advantages accruing to family firms in this context. We also explore how selection processes tend to lead to family franchisor/family franchisee matches that enable a more effective sharing of complementary resources. The theoretical framework we develop is grounded in the “familiness” of the family firm as suggested by the logic of the resource based view. Additionally, our theoretical analysis extends and complements the frequent use of agency theory as the basis for studying franchising

  • 8.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University.
    Knowledge internalization and product development in family firms: When relational and affective factors matter2016In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 201-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the forces that support and inhibit product development (PD) in family firms is central to explaining their long-term success and survival. Our study reveals that social capital and relational conflict among family members do not affect PD directly, as existing theory suggests, but only through the internalization of knowledge among family members. In contrast, family members’ affective commitment to the family firm is so powerful that it has both a mediated and a direct effect on PD. These results differ across generations of the controlling family, therefore offering an extension of existing theories of knowledge and PD in family firms.

  • 9.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, Queensland University of Technology.
    Gordon, Scott R.
    Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation, and Innovation Centre, The University of Adelaide.
    Much ado about nothing? The surprising persistence of nascent entrepreneurs through macroeconomic crisis2016In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 915-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We hypothesize that a major macroeconomic crisis triggers four alternative responses among nascent entrepreneurs: disengagement, delay, compensation, and adaptation. We also suggest that commitment and ambition (or “high potential”) moderate these responses. Our most important finding is the relative absence of behavioral crisis responses. However, crises may make high-tech founders become more likely to disengage, whereas the opposite holds for founders far into the process. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms behind aggregate effects of crises on the number and type of start-ups in an economy, and can guide future research on the effect of crises on nascent entrepreneurship.

  • 10.
    Dawson, Alexandra
    et al.
    John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.
    Sharma, Pramodita
    School of Business Administration, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA.
    Irving, P. Gregory
    School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada.
    Markus, Joel
    Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Predictors of later-generation family members' commitment to family enterprises2015In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 545-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the antecedents of different bases of organizational commitment and intention to stay of later-generation family members who are currently working in their family firm. Evidence from 199 Canadian and Swiss firms indicates that when these individuals' identity and career interests are aligned with their family enterprise, they experience affective commitment. Family expectations are associated with normative commitment. Individuals who are concerned about losing inherited financial wealth or who perceive a lack of alternative career paths stay with the family enterprise because of continuance commitment. Finally, individuals driven by desire or obligation exhibit low turnover intentions.

  • 11. De Bruin, Anne
    et al.
    Brush, Candida
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Advancing a framework for coherent research on women's entrepreneurship2007In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 323-339Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. De Bruin, Anne
    et al.
    Brush, Candida
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Towards building cumulative knowledge on women's entrepreneurship2006In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 585-593Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Delmar, Frederic
    et al.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    The effect of small business managers' growth motivation on firm growth: A longitudinal study2008In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 437-457Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    DeTienne, Dawn R.
    et al.
    Colorado State University, USA.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Exit strategies in family firms: how socioemotional wealth drives the threshold of performance2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1297-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research has shown the ability to exit from both successful and unsuccessful ventures is important to founders, families, firms, industries, and overall economic health, exiting from a family firm can be especially challenging. In this paper, we examine exit strategies in the context of the family firm and the family firm portfolio. Drawing upon threshold theory and the socioemotional wealth perspective, we develop a model that provides guiding theoretical explanations for exit strategies. We address two questions: (1) why do family owners develop specific exit strategies, and (2) how do these strategies differ within family firms and family firm portfolios? In doing so, we contribute to family business, portfolio entrepreneurship, and exit literatures.

  • 15.
    Fitz-Koch, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Center for Agricultural Business Management, Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish Center for Agricultural Business Management, Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Carter, Sara
    The Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, Strathclyde University, and the UK Enterprise Research Centre, Glasgow, UK.
    Hunter, Erik
    Swedish Center for Agricultural Business Management, Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurship in the agricultural sector: A literature review and future research opportunities2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 129-166Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heeding calls for contextualizing entrepreneurship research and for greater attention to the role of sector in entrepreneurship research, we conduct a systematic literature review of extant research in agricultural entrepreneurship. Recent and rapid vertical integration and rationalization within the agricultural sector provides a dynamic setting for scholars to investigate entrepreneurship theory and practice. We identify three key contextual dimensions of the agricultural sector: identity, family, and institutions, which provide promising opportunities for future research and the potential to contribute to and extend current theoretical and empirical analyses of entrepreneurship research.

  • 16. Gartner, W.
    et al.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Zahra, Shaker
    Are you talking to me?: The nature of community in entrepreneurship scholarship2006In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Gartner, William B.
    et al.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Zahra, Shaker A.
    Are You Talking to Me? The Nature of Community in Entrepreneurship Scholarship2006In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 321-331Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gedajlovic, E.
    et al.
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Moore, C. B.
    Rawls College of Business, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, United States.
    Payne, G. T.
    Rawls College of Business, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, United States.
    Wright, M.
    Imperial College Business School, University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Social Capital and Entrepreneurship: A Schema and Research Agenda2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 455-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction to the special issue considers past and current research on "Social Capital and Entrepreneurship" to develop a schema and an associated research agenda. With the general goal of establishing social capital as a foundational theory of entrepreneurship, we discuss how future research can utilize social capital perspectives across levels of analysis and contexts to explain a wide variety of entrepreneurship phenomena.

  • 19.
    Hughes, Karen
    et al.
    Department of Strategic Management and Organization, School of Business; Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Jennings, Jennifer E.
    Department of Strategic Management and Organization, School of Business, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Brush, Candida
    Franklin W. Olin Chair in Entrepreneurship, Chair-Entrepreneurship Division, Director-Arthur M. Blank Center for Entrepreneurship, Babson College, Arthur M. Blank Center for Entrepreneurship, Wellesley.
    Carter, Sara
    Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, Strathclyde Business School, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Extending Women’s Entrepreneurship Research in New Directions2012In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 429-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dramatic expansion of scholarly interest and activity in the field of women's entrepreneurship within recent years has done much to correct the historical inattention paid to female entrepreneurs and their initiatives. Yet, as the field continues to develop and mature, there are increasingly strong calls for scholars to take their research in new directions. Within this introduction to the special issue, we expand upon the reasons for this call, describe who responded, and summarize the new frontiers explored within the work appearing in this and another related collection. We conclude by delineating new territories for researchers to explore, arguing that such endeavors will join those in this volume in not only addressing the criticisms raised to date, but also in generating a richer and more robust understanding of women's entrepreneurship.

  • 20. McKelvie, Alexander
    et al.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Advancing firm growth research: A focus on growth mode instead of growth rate2010In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 261-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of firm growth research has been notably slow. In this paper, we argue that a major reason for this lack of development is the impatience of researchers to prematurely address the question of “how much?” before adequately providing answers to the question “how?” On the basis of an extensive review of the literature, we suggest how growth research can advance by changing focus to growth mode (organic, acquisition, hybrid). Toward this end, we provide a research agenda that helps establish the types of questions that growth researchers can ask within this new focus.

  • 21.
    Naldi, Lucia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Cennamo, Carmelo
    Bocconi University, Department of Management and Technology, Milano, Italy.
    Corbetta, Guido
    Bocconi University, Department of Management and Technology, Milano, Italy.
    Gomez-Mejia, Luis
    Texas A&M University, Department of Management, Mays Business School, Texas, USA.
    Preserving Socioemotional Wealth in Family Firms: Asset or Liability? The Moderating Role of Business Context2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1341-1360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We ask whether choices aimed at preserving socioemotional wealth (SEW) represent an asset or a liability in family-controlled firms. Specifically, we consider one major SEW-preserving mechanism—having as chief executive officer (CEO) a member of the controlling family—and hypothesize that this choice is (1) an asset in business contexts, such as industrial districts, in which tacit rules and social norms are relatively more important, but (2) a potential liability in contexts like stock exchange markets, where formal regulations and transparency principles take center stage. The results from our empirical analysis confirm these hypotheses.

  • 22.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Familiness in Top Management Teams: Commentary on Ensley and Pearson's "an exploratory comparison of the behavioral dynamics of top management teams in family and nonfamily new ventures: Cohesion, conflict, potency, and consensus"2005In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 285-291Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Rauch, Andreas
    et al.
    Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lumpkin, G.T.
    Texas Tech University, Rawls College of Business.
    Frese, Michael
    University of Giessen.
    Entrepreneurial Orientation and Business Performance: Cumulative Empirical Evidence2009In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 761-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has received substantial conceptual and empirical attention, representing one of the few areas in entrepreneurship research where a cumulative body of knowledge is developing. The time is therefore ripe to document, to review, and to evaluate the cumulative knowledge on the relationship between EO and business performance. Extending beyond qualitative assessment, we undertook a meta-analysis exploring the magnitude of the EO-performance relationship and assessed potential moderators affecting this relationship. Analyses of 53 samples from 51 studies with an N of 14,259 companies indicated that the correlation of EO with performance is moderately large (r = .242) and that this relationship is robust to different operationalizations of key constructs as well as cultural contexts. Internal and environmental moderators were identified, and results suggest that additional moderators should be assessed. Recommendations for future research are developed.

  • 24. Schmude, J.
    et al.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Heumann, S.
    Entrepreneurship Research in Germany2008In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 289-311Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    et al.
    IULM University, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    IULM University, Italy.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Generational involvement in the top management team of family firms: Exploring nonlinear effects on entrepreneurial orientation2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 69-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study contends that an inverted U-shaped relationship exists between generational involvement –i.e. the number of family generations simultaneously involved in the family firm top management team (TMT) – and corporate entrepreneurship (CE). Drawing on the upper echelons theory, we conceive generational involvement as a proxy of knowledge diversity in multigenerational family TMTs. We argue that while moderate levels of generational involvement stimulate task-related constructive conflicts for CE, increased kinship distance and relationship conflicts led by high levels of generational involvement are likely to undermine this potential advantage by damaging the relational context for CE.

  • 26.
    Shepherd, Dean A.
    et al.
    Indiana University.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Are we comparing apples with apples or apples with oranges?: Appropriateness of knowledge accumulation across growth studies.2009In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 105-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although knowledge accumulation is dependent upon relationships among constructs being robust across different measurement and sampling decisions, scholars have not sufficiently established such robustness for the construct of firm growth. Focusing on this construct, we conduct analyses on all Swedish firms incorporated during the 1994 to 1998 period (68,830 firms) and track their growth (or demise) over their first 6 years of existence. Although we typically find low shared variance between different growth measures, there is variability such that some measures demonstrate high and/or moderate concurrent validity. These findings have implications for how we delineate the boundaries of firm growth research and accumulate knowledge—when we are comparing apples with apples and when we are comparing apples with oranges.

  • 27. Steffens, Paul
    et al.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Fitzsimmons, Jason
    Performance Configurations over time: Implications for growth- and profit-orientated strategies2009In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 125-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Steffens, Paul R.
    et al.
    Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, QUT Business School, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Weeks, Clinton S.
    School of Advertising, Marketing, and Public Relations, QUT Business School, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Isaak, Lauren
    Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, QUT Business School, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Shouting from the ivory tower: A marketing approach to improve communication of academic research to entrepreneurs2014In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 399-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence-based practice in entrepreneurship requires effective communication of research findings. We focus on how research synopses can “promote” research to entrepreneurs. Drawing on marketing communications literature, we examine how message characteristics of research synopses affect their appeal. We demonstrate the utility of conjoint analysis in this context and find message length, media richness, and source credibility to have positive influences. We find mixed support for a hypothesized negative influence of jargon, and for our predictions that participants’ involvement with academic research moderates these effects. Exploratory analyses reveal latent classes of entrepreneurs with differing preferences, particularly for message length and jargon.

  • 29.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Contextualising entrepreneurship - Conceptual Challenges and Ways Forward2011In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 165-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to explore contexts for entrepreneurship, illustrating how a contextualized view of entrepreneurship contributes to our understanding of the phenomenon. There is growing recognition in entrepreneurship research that economic behavior can be better understood within its historical, temporal, institutional, spatial, and social contexts, as these contexts provide individuals with opportunities and set boundaries for their actions. Context can be an asset and a liability for the nature and extent of entrepreneurship, but entrepreneurship can also impact contexts. The paper argues that context is important for understanding when, how, and why entrepreneurship happens and who becomes involved. Exploring the multiplicity of contexts and their impact on entrepreneurship, it identifies challenges researchers face in contextualizing entrepreneurship theory and offers possible ways forward.

  • 30.
    Welter, Friederike
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University.
    Lasch, Frank
    Montpellier Business School.
    Entrepreneurship Research in Europe: Taking Stock and Looking Forward2008In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Welter, Friederike
    et al.
    Jönköping University. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Smallbone, David
    Small Business Research Centre (SBRC), Kingston University, London.
    Exploring the role of trust for entrepreneurial activities2006In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 465-475Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Commentary: Family firms and social responsibility: Preliminary evidence from the S & P 5002006In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 803-808Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Audretsch, David
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The Future of Entrepreneurship Research2011In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 1-9Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Delmar, Frédéric
    What do they think and feel about growth?: An expectancy-value approach to small business managers’ attitudes toward growth2003In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 247-269Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Bird, Miriam
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Internal Versus External Ownership Transition in Family Firms: An Embeddedness Perspective2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1319-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate factors that influence family business owners' choice between passing ownership within the family or to new external owners. Taking an embeddedness perspective focusing on owner-family structure and involvement, we hypothesize that ownership dispersion, number of potential heirs, multigenerational involvement, and whether the chief executive officer is a family member influence the choice of an internal or external transition of ownership. We build a longitudinal data set from a sample of 3,829 family firms and their ownership transitions. Our theorizing and findings regarding ownership transitions complements the abundant research on management succession and therefore constitutes an important contribution to the literature.

  • 36.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Shepherd, Dean A
    Portfolio entrepreneurship: Habitual and novice founders, new entry and mode of organizing2008In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 701-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the purpose of advancing our understanding of portfolio entrepreneurship, we separate the act of entrepreneurship (new entry) from its mode or organizing (internal vs. independent organization). Analyzing a cohort of 2,253 novice and habitual business founders, we find that portfolio entrepreneurship is a common phenomenon and that the majority of portfolio entrepreneurs use the internal mode of organizing. Whether or not business founders subsequently pursue portfolio entrepreneurship is explained by their human capital (education and start-up experience) and social capital (business networks and links with government support agencies). Further, novice entrepreneurs are more likely to organize portfolio entrepreneurship within their existing firms while habitual entrepreneurs more often organize subsequent acts of portfolio entrepreneurship by creating another new independent organization. Implications for entrepreneurship research are discussed.

  • 37.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Shepherd, Dean A.
    The effectiveness of alliances and acquisitions: The role of resources combination activities2009In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 193-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource complementarity increases the potential value of alliances and acquisitions, but the extent to which the value potential of an alliance or an acquisition becomes realized depends on the ability of the firm to discover and conduct productive resource combinations. Using a sample of 319 small firms, we separate domestic from international alliances and acquisitions and show that alliances and acquisitions bring limited benefits to firms unless deliberate effort is devoted to resource combination. These findings help resolve conflicts in the resource-based literature concerning the benefits of alliances and acquisitions.

  • 38.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
    Shepherd, Dean A.
    Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.
    Where to from here?: EO-as-experimentation, failure and distribution of outcomes2011In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 925-946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two potential causal mechanisms underlying the observed entrepreneurial orientation (EO)–performance relationship. We find empirical support for the notion that EO might be a performance–variance-enhancing strategic orientation rather than a performance–mean-enhancing orientation. With such a conceptualization, performance variance (along with, or instead of, mean performance) and failure take center stage. To address the question of “where to from here,” we discuss a number of research opportunities that we believe are going to make important contributions to the entrepreneurship and strategy literature.

  • 39.
    Zellweger, Thomas M.
    et al.
    University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Nason, Robert S.
    Babson College, Boston, USA.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brush, Candida G.
    Babson College, Arthur M. Blank Center for Entrepreneurship.
    Why Do Family Firms Strive for Nonfinancial Goals? An Organizational Identity Perspective2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 229-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops an organizational identity-based rationale for why family firms strive for nonfinancial goals. We show that the visibility of the family in the firm, the transgenerational sustainability intentions of the family, and the capability of the firm for self-enhancement of the family positively influence the importance of identity fit between family and firm as well as the family's concern for corporate reputation. We suggest that the concern for corporate reputation leads the family to pursue nonfinancial goals to the benefit of nonfamily stakeholders. We also discuss reinforcing feedback loops in these processes.

1 - 39 of 39
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