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  • 1.
    Ericson, Mona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    As in the composition of a fugue: Capturing the flow of strategic business activities2008In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing inspiration from classical music, this article introduces a musical metaphor - the fugue - to capture a flow of strategic activities, highlighting the motion aspect. This particular metaphor connotes dynamism, constituted in themes, which are repeated, expanded and varied through human voices and their communication. By giving voice to people who share and participate in globalization, internationalization and customization related to the efforts of a company to grow continuously, elevating movements inherent in these activities, a fugue is composed. As argued in the article, there is potential in ‘musicking’ interpretation of human activity. The fugue metaphor could assist our efforts to methodologize strategy process as dynamic multi-direction and multi-voice construct. While directing more attention to a musical, arts-based form of communicating research we could be able to listen more carefully to the moves inherent in a flow of human activity.

  • 2.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Atterström, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Department of Education and Special/Inclusive education, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    But was it Trustworthy?: Methodological Experiences From a Study of a Hard-to-Reach Group of Students in Need of a Flexible Research Approach2024In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 23, article id 16094069241234805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical research on experiences of learning among students with severe speech and physical impairment (SSPI) is sparse. This may be due to a lack of research-on-research methodology literature about students with SSPI, as they are difficult to find and there are barriers to their participation in mainstream research. Hence, method development is especially important regarding these students, who cannot participate when traditional inquiry methods are used. This article's objective is therefore to advance method development by means of a retrospective investigation. The empirical findings consist of documented experiences from a previous study of students with SSPI (henceforth, "literacy study"). A computer-assisted email dialogue technique was developed in the literacy study's pilot study and eventually used in the main study, to investigate the students' experiences of their literacy development. The aim of this study is to retrospectively and critically examine the scientific trustworthiness of a methodological research approach based on an email dialogue technique used exploratively in the literacy study, to investigate the literacy development among the students grounded in their own experiences, and to contribute methodological experiences gained from that study regarding the relationship between the use of verification strategies and checking techniques. The computer-assisted email dialogue approach was necessary because the few participants were spread over great geographical distances. The approach was developed as an explorative and flexible inclusive research design and was used within the tradition of participatory research. The students in both the pilot and main studies (8-16 years of age) were treated as collaborators rather than research subjects. Both the verification strategies and techniques regarding trustworthiness criteria were found to be important for trustworthiness. The main conclusion, based on our experiences in this retrospective investigation, is that it is necessary to continuously and thoroughly focus on trustworthiness issues throughout the research process to obtain trustworthy findings.

  • 3.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). Linnaeus University, Växjö–Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö–Kalmar, Sweden.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Rose, Richard
    University of Northampton, United Kingdom.
    Shevlin, Michael
    Trinity College, The University of Dublin, Ireland.
    Conducting the pilot study: A neglected part of the research process? Methodological findings supporting the importance of piloting in qualitative research studies2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 18, article id 1609406919878341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the development of research to compare the processes and impact of inclusive education in Sweden with results obtained from a study undertaken in Ireland, a pilot study was conducted and documented. The pilot study had three aims: (1) to gather data to provide guidance for a substantive study adapted to Swedish conditions through modification of Irish research procedures and instruments, (2) to critically interrogate how we as researchers could most effectively conduct a pilot study utilizing observational and video-recorded data, and (3) to use the Irish theoretical model as a tool of analysis for studying inclusion in two Swedish schools. Although pilot studies are frequently conducted to assess the efficacy of research instruments for use in qualitative research projects, few publications have drawn upon empirical findings related to such studies. Additionally, while methodological texts recommend the use of pilot studies in qualitative research, there is a lack of reported research focusing on how to conduct such pilot studies. We argue that our methodological findings may contribute to greater awareness of the important role that a pilot study may have for full-scale qualitative research projects, for example, in case study research where semi-structured qualitative interviews are used. This argument is based on the assumption that researchers, and especially novice researchers, having conducted a pilot study will be better informed and prepared to face the challenges that are likely to arise in the substantive study and more confident in the instruments to be used for data collection. A proper analysis of the procedures and results from the pilot study facilitates the identification of weaknesses that may be addressed. A carefully organized and managed pilot study has the potential to increase the quality of the research as results from such studies can inform subsequent parts of the research process.

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