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  • 1.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Construction Logistics Group, KTS, ITN, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    The role of supplier information availability for construction supply chain performance2022In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 33, no 9-10, p. 863-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of coordination of the construction supply chain (CSC) creates a chain of problems. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to knowledge about coordination within CSCs and how the lack thereof can impact their supply chain performance. Coordination encompasses several different mechanisms, whereof focus here has been information sharing with the unit of analysis suppliers’ information availability. Four suppliers active within the CSC, delivering to several different projects have been studied. These represent two different delivery patterns, continuous and intermittent deliveries. Based on the analysis of their information availability are two propositions made; (1) due to the loose couplings and the lack of understanding among main contractors of the value of information sharing, suppliers with continuous supply have an information advantage due to their presence on site, (2) suppliers can enhance their information availability, by increasing their service offering to customers.

  • 2.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Product Realization, School of Innovation Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Division of Product Realization, School of Innovation Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter E.
    Division of Innovation Management, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Lead factory operationalisation and challenges2019In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deepens the understanding of the lead factory concept by examining how the lead factory role is operationalised and what challenges are associated with it. The research is based on an explorative case study of eight Swedish lead factories in the manufacturing industry. The empirical findings suggest that the understanding of the lead factory concept should be extended as it is not restricted to one type of set-up. The findings show a spectrum ranging from an entire manufacturing plant, parts of a plant, to a virtual plant considered to be the lead factory. The research also shows a broad range of challenges experienced by lead factories. Several of these are related to and originate from unclear role, responsibility and mandate of the lead factory. The lack of dedicated resources for lead factory activities, specifically long-term development and difficulties in measuring the benefits of the role, were other challenges faced. 

  • 3.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mattsson, Stig-Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Causes and actions related to self-induced variations in manufacturing companies2022In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short-term and stochastic variations can create negative effects on the delivery capability, and companies often adopt their processes accordingly. What is then ignored is the fact that causes for variations are often self-induced and, therefore, possible to affect. Proposed actions in current literature focus mainly on continuous improvement without explicitly emphasizing that certain behaviours, rules and routines have a direct impact on variations affecting the company. In this study, a framework of causes for self-induced variations is established with proposed actions for each cause to reduce the variations. The framework is situated relative to practice for the actions applied at six manufacturing companies. This study sought to increase the understanding of self-induced variations and where companies can apply the proposed framework for an overview of 22 causes and 60 appropriate actions to support the systematic reduction of self-induced variations that can be internally or externally generated. 

  • 4.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mattsson, Stig-Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Identification and selection of safety buffers in manufacturing companies2023In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The view on safety buffers is fragmented in the current literature; some researchers argue that a safety buffer is only waste, while others see them as prerequisites to absorb variations and secure a competitive delivery capability. This study conceptualises various safety buffer types in terms of materials, capacity and lead time to mitigate the negative effects of short-term stochastic variations in supply and demand. The identified safety buffers are categorised based on a material flow perspective as inbound, process and outbound buffers. In total, seven safety buffer sub-types are identified and investigated in terms of their utilization in four manufacturing companies. The experiences from eleven respondents highlight the utilization purposes in their selection of safety buffers. The empirical investigation also indicates several concerns through four propositions that highlight the significance of decision support, providing a more holistic perspective on different types and sub-types of safety buffers and their application in practice. Finally, a conceptual framework is proposed to facilitate the selection of safety buffers in practice. 

  • 5.
    Jafari, Hamid
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Ghaderi, Hadi
    Department of Management and Marketing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Malik, Mohsin
    Department of Management and Marketing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bernardes, Ednilson
    John Chambers College of Business and Economics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA.
    The effects of supply chain flexibility on customer responsiveness: the moderating role of innovation orientation2023In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 34, no 16, p. 1543-1561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the link between supply chain (SC) flexibility and responsiveness. Our study contributes to the literature by examining how SC flexibility, as a multi-dimensional construct, affects customer responsiveness and if this relationship is moderated by the innovation orientation of a firm. Using data from 225 Swedish manufacturers, we test our proposed empirical model and find empirical support for the positive effects of the supply chain flexibility dimensions on customer responsiveness. In addition, we found support for the strengthening effect of innovation orientation on the link between internal flexibility and customer responsiveness. The empirical validation of the relationship between the multi-dimensional SC flexibility and customer responsiveness which is moderated by the innovation orientation is an original contribution to both theory and practice.

  • 6.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    et al.
    LiU, IKP.
    Comstock, Mica
    LIU, IKP.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    From Mass Production to Mass Customization: Enabling perspectives from the Swedish mobile telephone industry2004In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 362-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much has been written about the conceptual nature of mass customization, and the success of several best business practitioners in the area have been well documented. Most companies, however, are not textbook examples of best practise, but rather are making incremental progress towards mass customization based on a mass production heritage. This paper presents the findings of a case study that investigated a mass customization initiative at a leading mobile telephone manufacturer in Sweden. The primary objective of the study was to determine the implications of a radically new manufacturing initiative for the company – the production of a customized, entry-level mobile telephone. The differences between the traditional scenario of the mass production of standardized products at the company and that of the new customized production were also sought. The findings of the study, which are presented using the product, process and system perspectives, are aided by a number of customization-related frameworks from the literature. The discussion includes the impact of moving the customization order point downstream in the value chain in terms of increased efficiency and reduced lead times, the reduced requirement for manufacturing flexibility with shifting production system boundaries, and the company’s status as a mass customizer.

  • 7.
    Karltun, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Berglund, Martina
    Quality and human systems engineering, Linköping University.
    Contextual conditions influencing the scheduler's work at a sawmill2010In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 359-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study addresses the issue of how contextual conditions influence scheduling work in practice at a sawmill in Sweden. Based on observations and interviews, activity analysis was used to study the work activities of the main scheduler. It is shown how the contextual conditions related to constraints, either in the technical system and the technical scheduling tools used by the scheduler or in the social system, delimit the possible ways for the scheduler to perform his work. It is furthermore illustrated how the scheduler sometimes used the contextual conditions as a means to control the sawmill production. Moreover, the presence of the numerous uncertainties in the production process is shown. Finally, the study demonstrates that the scheduler's thorough knowledge, experience, and skills of both the technical and the social systems had immense influence in his ability to perform during daily scheduling work.

  • 8.
    Katana, Toni
    et al.
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Andreas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Decision model for product rollover in manufacturing operations2017In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 28, no 15, p. 1264-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate critical decisions when planning for product rollover at a manufacturing company, and how to organise these decisions. A literature review and a case study are used to develop a decision model. The findings indicate that product rollover can be organised in a five-phase decision model. The research quality is strengthened by a structured literature review, but it can be argued that more empirical research is needed for validation. For researchers, this paper contributes with the identification of critical decisions and a model for product rollover. For practitioners, the study highlights the need to acknowledge the importance of product rollover and its role as a competitive weapon. In earlier studies, product rollover has mainly been investigated from a market perspective, so that this study contributes by investigating the issue from a manufacturing perspective.

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  • 9.
    Melander, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Andersson, David
    Borand AB, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Management innovation in SMEs – taking psychological ownership of Hoshin Kanri2023In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management innovations are an important source of competitive advantage, but we lack knowledge on the implementation process, not least in small- and medium-sized companies (SMEs). Recognising that psychological ownership (PO) represents a crucial aspect of the implementation process, we address micro-foundational characteristics of the implementation process. PO and critical incident theory (CIT) provide a lens enabling this micro analysis. The empirical setting is the implementation of Hoshin Kanri, a strategic management system in eight small companies. From the analysis of the eight cases, we operationalise four dimensions that characterise how PO evolves in the implementation process: types of PO incidents, frequency of PO incidents, incidents indicating an increase or decrease in PO, and incidents addressing individual or collective PO. Looking at how PO is developed both among CEOs and managers in SMEs, we use the four dimensions to characterise the evolvement of PO within the focal organisations. In doing so, our article elaborates on PO as a driver and, if insufficiently developed, an impediment to effectively implementing management innovations.

  • 10. Olhager, Jan
    et al.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Production Planning and Control Tools2000In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 210-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are numerous tools available to be used for production planning and control purposes. The number of tools is ever increasing, and so are the levels of sophistication as well as complexity. For the specific manufacturing firm, the task of selecting the most appropriate set of tools is not trivial. However, in recent years, the understanding of the relationship between tools and manufacturing environments for which they are suitable has increased. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of production planning and control tools available today, as well as new trends, issues and ideas.

  • 11.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Haug, Anders
    Department of Entrepreneurship and Relationship Management, University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Engaging with ‘Engineer for Supply Chain’ (EfSC): insights from two engineer-to-order manufacturers2023In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of ‘Design for Supply Chain’ (DfSC) aims at integrating strategic sourcing into manufacturers’ new product development (NPD) processes. The literature on this topic, however, mainly focuses on contexts involving high-volume, standardised products, while the engineer-to-order (ETO) context has received only limited attention. As argued in this paper, this constitutes a gap in the literature since the findings from high-volume, standardised contexts may not be directly applicable to the ETO context. To support this claim, a case study approach is used to explore DfSC in two ETO manufacturers. This paper terms this practice ‘Engineer for Supply Chain’ (EfSC) and identifies four dimensions that it comprises: (1) consideration of strategic sourcing in NPD, (2) representation of the sourcing function in NPD, (3) collaboration between the R&D and sourcing functions, and (4) adoption of methods for considering strategic sourcing in NPD. Although these dimensions partly overlap with the literature on DfSC, the characteristics of EfSC differ—most notably by requiring the consideration of strategic sourcing before the product design stage of NPD, as well as procedures that encourage this consideration. Finally, the study identifies relationships among the dimensions and develops a holistic four-step process for engaging with EfSC.

  • 12.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Supply chain design during product development: a systematic literature review2023In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1-18Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how supply chains can be designed during product development (PD) through systematically reviewing 143 peer-reviewed journal articles written in English. The findings indicate that practitioners can perform 14 supply chain design (SCD) activities during PD. These activities are grouped into levels and areas, and a model is developed that interrelates SCD with nine product characteristics. Therewith, scholars are given a deep insight into the literature on SCD during PD. The paper also provides a framework for developing company- and project-specific checklists that can be used for multiple purposes, including planning, performing, or evaluating SCD activities before, during, or after PD projects. The implementation of the framework, according to the characteristics of a manufacturer and its PD projects, constitutes an opportunity for the creation of resilient supply chains.

  • 13. Rudberg, Martin
    et al.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Mass Customization in Terms of the Customer Order Decoupling Point2004In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 445-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years the customer order decoupling point (CODP) has gained increased acceptance as an important concept when organizing value-adding activities in production and logistics. The CODP, which is defined as the point in the value-adding material flow that separates decisions made under uncertainty from decisions made under certainty concerning customer demand, is however normally only used for production- and distribution- related activities. Here we adjust the typical CODP typology and show how the engineering resources can be integrated with the production process so as to take the features of mass customization environments into account. This paper also examines existing mass customization frameworks and offers a more thorough and nuanced typology for classifying various levels of mass customization. Finally, the adjusted CODP typology is used as a foundation for developing a reliable order promise process for mass customizers.

  • 14.
    Sarker, Sudipa
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Business Dev & Technol, Herning, Denmark.;HUMLOG Inst, Hanken Sch Econom, Helsinki, Finland..
    Rashidi, Kamran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Golgeci, Ismail
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Business Dev & Technol, Herning, Denmark..
    Gligor, David M.
    Univ North Texas, Denton, TX USA.;Univ North Texas, Denton, TX 76201 USA..
    Hsuan, Juliana
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Operat Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark..
    Exploring pillars of supply chain competitiveness: insights from leading global supply chains2022In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore key pillars of supply chain competitiveness (SCC) and understand how top supply chains remain competitive in the long term. The research design is divided into two phases. First, an extensive review of the scholarly SCC literature is conducted to identify the core pillars that help achieve SCC. Second, the literature published in practitioner outlets on the five selected companies of Gartner's Supply Chain Top 25 is scrutinized to understand how top supply chains apply the core pillars of SCC in practice. A total of 193 scientific and practitioner articles were analyzed to develop the key pillars of SCC. This study identified six key pillars of SCC in the literature: innovation, sustainability, collaboration, information technology, agility, and flexibility. It has been found that a combination of these pillars, if not all, will be required to remain competitive in the post-COVID-19 era.

  • 15.
    Tiedemann, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Gosling, Jonathan
    Logistics Systems Dynamics Group, Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Structuring a new product development process portfolio using decoupling thinking2020In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 38-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to develop a structured new product development (NPD) process portfolio for manufacturing companies that facilitates the organization of NPD processes for both standardized products, focusing on time-to-market, and customized products, focusing on time-to-customer. The research combines different literature streams, enriching and advancing the understanding of decoupling thinking in NPD processes of manufacturing companies. It includes extensive empirical data from six manufacturing companies and presents testable propositions for further research. The resulting NPD process portfolio separates technology development from product development, acknowledges the different drivers and outcomes of processes and addresses the lead-time trade-offs. It provides an overview of potential options for NPD processes and shows different pathways through the processes. Companies can use the portfolio to support decisions related to the overall configuration of their NPD portfolios, the role and the range of different NPD processes, as well as to determine when and how to engage customers.

  • 16.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Yang, Biao
    School of Business, Management and Economics, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
    Yang, Ying
    Newcastle University Business School, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK .
    Williams, Sharon J.
    College of Human & Health Sciences, Swansea University, Swansea, UK .
    Decoupling thinking in service operations: a case in healthcare delivery system design2017In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 387-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of decoupling thinking has been well established in the manufacturing operations and supply chain management literature. This paper explores how this decoupling thinking can be applied in service operations and in particular in health care. It first reviews the relevant literature on decoupling fundamentals, the front- and back-office distinction, and new emerging decoupling thinking in service operations. Subsequently, a flow-based framework including content and process is developed for decoupling thinking in service operations. The framework provides an integrated perspective on customer contact, flow driver and flow differentiation (level of customisation). The framework hence, through flow differentiation, introduces the concept of standardisation versus customisation in a service context. This is followed by a health care case example to illustrate how the framework can be applied. The managerial implications are primarily in terms of a modularised approach to system design and management. The framework offers potential for benchmarking with other service systems as well as with manufacturing systems based on the shared foundation in decoupling thinking. Finally, suggestions are provided for further research opportunities derived from this research. 

  • 17.
    Wong, Hartanto
    et al.
    Cardiff University.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Naim, Mohammed
    Cardiff University.
    Evaluation of postponement in manufacturing systems with non-negligible changeover times2010In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 258-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to examine the cost or benefit implications of employing postponement in the manufacturingenvironments characterised by non-negligible changeover times incurred when switching production from oneproduct to another. Four manufacturing configurations are distinguished based on the choice of manufacturingtechnology and on whether or not postponement is employed. Analytical evaluation methods based on queuingmodels are used to assess operational measures for each configuration and solution algorithms are developedto determine the optimal decisions that may include stocking level, batch size and differentiation point.A numerical experiment is carried out to identify how the system performance is affected by different parameters.

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